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Thread: Hydro-power?

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Hydro-power?

    Just wondering if anyone here has year round hydro power? Is there any rivers in alaska that would provide it?

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    Just wondering if anyone here has year round hydro power? Is there any rivers in alaska that would provide it?
    Pretty sure there are some people around ANC with with hydro power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    Just wondering if anyone here has year round hydro power? Is there any rivers in alaska that would provide it?
    Alaska has lots of commercial hydroelectric facilities. You can read an overview in the link attached. Lots of folks have on-site hydro for their personal power. Rivers aren't really the best source. A stream or spring with steep surroundings is what works best. Small turbines require minimum flow and "head" (vertical drop) to spin the turbines. If you're lucky enough to have the topography it's a fantastic way to get abundant electricity 24/7/365. Solar and wind can't do that.

    http://alaskarenewableenergy.org/ala...hydroelectric/

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    My neighbor, an ex state representative, rolls w/ hydro. He got a deal on like 4200ft of 4" hard plastic tubing and we ran it from a stream on the side of baldy and buried it about 9' most of the way. Theres hella head pressure so where its exposed it doesn't freeze. The only problem I know of was when some guy shot it. The spent water goes into his man-made lake, I'm not sure how thats going I haven't really been up there lately

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input so far. I would of thought that streams would freeze due to the smaller size. So if it's flow that allow it not too, what kind of flow does it take not to freeze? I'm sure that there are all kinds of variables to this but just tryong to learn general info. Are certain areas of alaska more prone to having this type of situations? If I wanted a piece of property what would allow hydro.... any suggestions on how to locate or the proper questions to ask or who to ask for that matter? Thanks for the help.

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    In the winter, creeks and rivers get most of their flow from groundwater that seeps into the streambed so there is almost always some flow all year. Spend much time snowmachining and you'll discover this first hand. Nothing like -20F and having your machine go through the ice !

    Like others have said, what you really want is vertical distance. A lot with steep terrain and a creek would be ideal. Channel some of the creek water into a pipe up high and put your turbine at the end of the pipe down low.

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