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Thread: goat-age

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    Default goat-age

    How do you tell how old you goat by the age rings

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akmike30 View Post
    How do you tell how old you goat by the age rings
    I just asked her...but turns out that may not have been my best choice!

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    I just asked her...but turns out that may not have been my best choice!
    Ha! Rep coming.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akmike30 View Post
    How do you tell how old you goat by the age rings
    I dunno, ask Big Horse...

    I tried once, but he came to the rescue

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Goats grow most of their horn in the first 3 years of life. They start to form growth rings that can be counted when they are about 2, then grow about 1/10th an inch a year after that. I read that after 7 the growth rings are harder to see. I learned this after I harvested a Billy and wanted to know how old he was.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    It's best taught with one in the hand really. 1/10 of an inch is really, really a small annuli 1/8 is small for those later years. Goats with good genetics get 1/4" or hopefully more per year in those later years past 5.

    The photos we posted on the last thread were good too. It's not like sheep where you'll be using optics to judge age.

    A friend I hunted with this year shot an ancient nanny and the bases of her horns were all decayed making the aging process very difficult for F&G. They said 9.5 but said that was a conservative estimate and she could have been 11.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Do you have a link to that last thread with photos Bighorse?, I'll search for it
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    like the other guys said after the goat gets more than 7 yrs old the age rings get really small....but they are still there.....goats are easier to count age rings on the front..whereas sheep are easy to count from the back (in hand)....anyways....count the sections, 6 sections equals 7 years old...the tip to the first ring equals 2 years....the goats have a horn "sheath" that wears off in the first two years creating the shiny obsidian looking horn....each section after that is one full year
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  9. #9

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    As stated above around 85% of a goats horn growth takes place in the first 3 years. After 3 the rings continue but are a lot smaller. Not mentioned above is that teeth can also be used to tell age. My buddy just shot a billy here in Colo and the DOW took a tooth as well as tried to age his goat from the rings on his horn. FYI, the teeth have rings on them just like horns.

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    @jimss......up here F&G take teeth from bears for the same purpose but never for goats...you would have to take one of the center incisors since that is grown the second year of life and the outer incisors are replaced every year there after until the goat has six or eight.....i could get a straight answer from the biologist this year about tooth growth in goats....this year the 4 yr old billy my friend killed had 4 adult incisors fully protruding, one half way and one that hadn't erupted....my co-workers 4 year old goat had all 6 fully protruding which was the same for the six year old that came into work with the lower jaw still attached.....the six year old i killed on kodiak island had 8 adult incisors ...im not sure but i think that some hunts require to salvage and turn in a portion of the lower jaw....but this may just be for moose
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    this should help


    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    looks like a good billy, congratulations
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Member yogibear's Avatar
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    Great info, thanks!

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