Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: best snowshoes for a big guy

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    103

    Default best snowshoes for a big guy

    ok here is my problem. im around 6 foot tall 285lbs without pack figure another 40 to 60 lbs for gear. is there a snow shoe that will hold my big ass up or should i just keep trecking it in my boots

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    I might be able to help yah if you buy the materials. Although shoes have a "fancy rating" on them.....call the manufactures and ask them how they calculated the weight......it's actually a joke. I have tubbs plastic mountaineering shoes and they make too much noise. I wish I had a home-made pair like what the Indians from my tribe made. Some call them Iversons, but I call them trekkers. They are an extremely long shoe (about 3.5 ft) and are about 16 inches wide. They are quiet and maneuver well. I'll teach yah the old Maine way to make shoes if you have time and space. That way there......you'll never have troubles again, you'll just have to get out the frame/mold, some rawhide, a couple sticks of ash.......and have em made in about 3 days (you have to let the spar varnish dry).

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    You could try the Tubbs Brand. They make a nice shoe that will last forever. As a big guy also, I have really enjoyed my pair and they seem to keep me afloat.
    http://www.imaginegear.com/Tubbs/bTubbs.html

  4. #4
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jesseakhunter View Post
    ok here is my problem. im around 6 foot tall 285lbs without pack figure another 40 to 60 lbs for gear. is there a snow shoe that will hold my big ass up or should i just keep trecking it in my boots
    Try 2 tobaggans.............jk........lol
    Sorry I couldn't be of more help............lol
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    This is my plan... http://www.upcountrysnowshoes.com/store.php I think the large alaskans would probably cover most of what I do, and they sound right since I am a large alaskan!

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    It depends on what snow conditions you are in. Snowshoes don't allow you to completely float on the snow, what they do is reduce the amount you sink, and provide a wide stable platform to stand on. My atlas shoes do a good job holding up my ~240#'s loaded, but grossing over 300#'s you'll certainly be sinking more. That said, it'll still be much less strenuous than postholing in boots.

    If your'e in deep dry powder you'll want some serious flotation, but in other conditions you might find that the largest modern type of snowshoes work just fine. I believe REI rents them, so it would be worth trying a pair out for a weekend to see how they work for you.

  7. #7
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I have the "big" atlas shoes and in deep mountain snow they are worse than just boots. The "dive" and then level off 2+ feet under the surface and force you to lift all that snow to get the shoe back up. They are great on a sno-go trail though. I am 6'5" and about 270lbs.

  8. #8
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    I'm 6'4"/270# and use the Cabelas Alaskan Outfitters in the 10"x36" size. They work well and I've been pleased with them. They have a nice ice cleat but it is a bit large and kind of uncomfortable to walk on if you are on hardpack or bare ice. Light weight and they are pretty easy to stow on a snowmachine.

    Not bad for $140 either.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  9. #9
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Apparently this thread is shaping up to be the prime recruiting ground for a defensive line in the first ever AOD snowshoe football championship!

    hmmmm, this could be interesting!

  10. #10
    Member AKPyron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Interior AK
    Posts
    143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Apparently this thread is shaping up to be the prime recruiting ground for a defensive line in the first ever AOD snowshoe football championship!

    hmmmm, this could be interesting!
    LMAO Well at 5' 10" 195 I'm not much good!

    Jesseak, ditto on what Paul H said. I use a pair of 9x30 and in 10 inches of powder I still sink about half way. The difference is that you don't have to deal with your heal and toe sinking on each step; making each one feel like a lunge as apposed to a regular step. Just a level stable platform to step on. If it gets too deep you will have to kind of high step it to avoid lifting too much snow. Also going up and down hill is exponentially easier due to the cleats. Even something like the Micro Spikes that strap on your boots do not compare. To equal a cleat from a snowshoe you would need full on cramp on's but those cost as much as snowshoes and don't give you the ability to float or provide an easy step.
    If you live your whole life afraid to die... Then you can never truly live!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    481

    Default

    I would get on ebay or check out garage sales and look for C.A. lund wooden snow shoes that are 10X56. They where made in the 40ies and I think the 50ies for the Military. They are the best pair that I have ever found. They have a big upturn on the toe 10" or so. What that does for you is that that you don't have to raise your knees as high and it will save enegry. If you can find them they run about 200 or so used. If you look hard enough you can still find them brand new. My second choice would be snocraft. They where made on lund jigs. They where made in the 50ies. Wooden one will give you more loft, will not collect as much snow on top of them, are more quiet then alumium ones. You can get leather bindings and they will fit different size boots. So in the early winter when you are out in lighter boots the bindings will still fit and then in the middle of winter when you have pack boots on you can just mkae them bigger to fit the bigger boots. The only maintance that I have done is every year is put a coat of marine varnish and then inspect the bindings.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    63

    Default

    I'm 5 10 and 280, when I put on my cloths, trap pack and gear I'm about 340 (the scale moans and groans and tells me to get off) I started off with the alum and cable, they lasted about 2 years then I got TUBBs they only lasted half a season before the platform ripped out. Now I'm using POWDERRIDGE and the straps that hold the platform are wearing out. I snowshoe my trapline (5 mile loop) twice a week, walking up and downhills over brush and trees. By the way, the customer service for Tubbs SUCK, when told about the problem they didnt really care nor do they make replacement parts for them

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    282

    Default

    Have any of you big guys tried MSR's with the tail extensions? I'm new to snowshoeing and doing research myself (6'3" 230#). I like the idea of a smooth plastic top for shedding snow off the tails when you lift your foot, the long metal traction bars on the bottom for sidehills, the simple bindings, and not a lot of parts to break (aluminum frame, vinyl body, rivets, straps, etc) just a clean formed shoe. Thoughts?

  14. #14
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    My few trips out in deep snow leads me to believe that the tail isn't the problem. I have problems with the toe diving since my weight is so far forward. I have the big Atlas shoes and was about 245 last time I used them.

  15. #15
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Apparently this thread is shaping up to be the prime recruiting ground for a defensive line in the first ever AOD snowshoe football championship!

    hmmmm, this could be interesting!
    LOL funny! Well at 6' 255, count on me as an inside linebacker (it's what I played in high school)!

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    13

    Talking

    Read the post I made in Military Snowshoes -

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...tary-snowshoes

    "Experienced with snowshoes...or as my kid sister says...older than dirt!"

    Been there and done that...I suspect I can help. I have twenty different pairs of shoes, and have experience with virtually all of them. I list the pros and cons, also what to expect...and none of it is from just reading about them...it is from fifty years of hands on experience...using the and making/repairing them.

    Oh...and by the way...I also am 6' 1" and go 265#

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default

    These are actually Tubbs Snowshoes made in China. Cabelas does not make their own product.

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Tubbs are made in China. they do not have warranty repair services. If the shoe breaks and is under warranty, they send you a new one. If it is not under warranty, you go buy new ones.

    Try an American made shoe like Crescent Moon or MSR. Both highest quality shoes on the market, however, the CM have much better bindings than any other shoe on the market.



    Quote Originally Posted by EBalaska View Post
    I'm 5 10 and 280, when I put on my cloths, trap pack and gear I'm about 340 (the scale moans and groans and tells me to get off) I started off with the alum and cable, they lasted about 2 years then I got TUBBs they only lasted half a season before the platform ripped out. Now I'm using POWDERRIDGE and the straps that hold the platform are wearing out. I snowshoe my trapline (5 mile loop) twice a week, walking up and downhills over brush and trees. By the way, the customer service for Tubbs SUCK, when told about the problem they didnt really care nor do they make replacement parts for them

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •