Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: What is in your Winter "Survival" Kit......?

  1. #1

    Default What is in your Winter "Survival" Kit......?

    In the summer I had three packs all set-up depending on the probability of having to overnight in the event of an accident. Low-High or moderate.
    But for winter there is really only one option, and that is plan for High risk. In the summer one might crawl out if they broke a leg, but your not going to crawl out through five feet of snow.

    Almost everything I do is solo hiking or snowshoeing. Having almost enough sleeping bag @ -16F below zero would get me just as dead as having NO sleeping bag. So I have cut some large sheets of 6 mill vis-queen to replace the bulk of a tent, plus trying to set-up a tent on snow if injured would be hard. So I plan to keep it simple, vis-queen, two light weight sleeping bags, plus what ever I can add up to about 35 pounds.
    I prefer external frame packs, but this kit will also double as a survival kit for the snow machine, and it demands no external frame which would snag on tree limbs & Alders.

    So What is in your winter survival kit......? Do you even have a winter survival kit....?

  2. #2

    Default

    Well, as all the gear needed to be someplace, I decided to build two, one very large day pack which ended up 34# and the external frame pack ended up 32#. I put the new temporary/interim survival gun on the day pack, and it is the same (27" OAL) as the pack, so it should work good. It is a 20 Ga. with 18 1/4" barrel & 27" Overall.

  3. #3

    Default

    Well, it has been several years since I have gone winter camping, since most of the outdoor activities I participate in these days usually involve being with my family and my kids (with the exception of extended hunts in the spring and fall). But, when I used to winter camp, I always thought it was very important to have a snow shovel and snow saw to build a snow shelter. Personally I prefer a snow shelter over a tent or a siwash camp with a tarp. Most snow shelters can be made in a reasonable amount of time. And if you are really in a bind, you can build a really quick ranger trench (or A-frame trench) by cutting two parallel lines in the snow about body length and about 2-3 ft deep, and pull out the blocks and stack them over the trench on an angle. Then take your snow shovel and throw loose snow over the gaps to make it somewhat airtight. You want a little ventilation, especially if you are going to burn a candle inside. This is a much better alternative in my opinion to a tent or a tarp. A better shelter if you have time is an igloo or a snow cave. They both take a little more time to build, but they are very warm and windproof. I would also bring with me an msr stove to melt snow for water, and a sleeping pad to keep my body off the cold ground. Bunny boots, Parka, Gore-tex shell pants, polypropylene underwear with many layers, wool or rabbit fur lined hat, balaclava, mittens, gps, compass, waterproof matches, flint and magnesium strikers, and a 22 caliber. That would be my list

  4. #4

    Default

    PLB. You can buy one for half of the cost of a used rifle, and it exponentially increases the odds that what could've been a 2-week fight for survival becomes merely a 5-hour wait for your ride home.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Wold a sat phone be better to have then a PLB? How do you test a PLB and ensure it is still functioning properly?

  6. #6

    Default

    The newer ones typically have a "send help" function that summons SAR, a "I'm OK" function that emails your location to any email addresses that you pre-program, and a "test" function that checks the status of your unit against the GPS and communication architecture it uses. And I'd imagine that if you can get sat phone reception, your PLB will be just fine. But with the PLB, it should take the "lost" part of your situation out of the picture, at least for your help.

  7. #7
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default

    I have one I keeep on my snowmachine. It has the essentials. Magnesium fire starter,waterproof matchcase with strike anywhere matches, metal cup for melting snow, Whistle,signal mirror (the kind designed for this), spare gloves and wool socks,candles, power bars,compass, Knife, some small rope/cord,and some other stuff I have probably forgot. I also carry my gerber hatchet with the saw built into the handle . I sharpen the hatchet after anytime it sees much use.
    I am always amazed on how many people go into the backcountry without any survival gear at all. Even just a few miles back you can get into enough trouble as to need a survival kit.
    One should always carry a knife and fire starting stuff on their person as well just in case they lose their machine such as falling through lake/river ice.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  8. #8

    Default

    What passes for a survival kit in Alaska is a 1/5 of booze, a Cell Phone & a Prayer. Which is why ever one spends $880.00 on a super-duper hand'cannon for bear protection, because there is a bear waiting behind every bush. And zilch on survival training or equipment. Next week I'll go out and perfect my debris shelter construction skills & a reflective fire heat system.

  9. #9
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    What passes for a survival kit in Alaska is a 1/5 of booze, a Cell Phone & a Prayer. Which is why ever one spends $880.00 on a super-duper hand'cannon for bear protection, because there is a bear waiting behind every bush. And zilch on survival training or equipment. Next week I'll go out and perfect my debris shelter construction skills & a reflective fire heat system.
    I think you are right thats what most people seem to never be without their Booze and their cell phone. LOL I am sure glad I don't drink. That way I can never forget the Booze.
    The bear part reminds me of a winter camping trip we were preping for a few years ago. We were checking out the machines after a tune up to one of them. Well I decided to go a little farther than was planned from my dads house for the checkride. The one machine ran out of gas( I thought the guage was broke) right at the edge of Tustumena lake. I decided to go back for gas while my buddy waited. It was probably only 30-45 minutes and I was back with the gas. As I approached the sled my buddy was nowhere in sight. He then came out of the woods holding a screwedriver from the tool kit on that machine. He said he was worried about the Wolves and was going to stab them if/when they attacked. I just laughed at him. I don't think he has even seen a wild wolf. Him and his brother are so bearanoid it is funny. That and they are usually unprepaired for even the most basic stuff. They usually count on me having emergency gear if it is needed and sometimes forget some basic gear for the trip itself.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  10. #10

    Default

    I would think that the Wilderness Survival part of this Forum, would be the most active, not the least active. I would strongly encourage everyone to learn the basics. I am active at: http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...archid=1924199 And: http://alaskansurvivalist.webs.com/ The bottom line there is NO reason to die in the wilderness, NONE.

  11. #11
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    I gotta say, AGL4now, I don't like to mix visqueen with snow. It slides on snow and it drips moisture back on you. Same with most "space blankets". For years now I have carried a light nylon tent fly which I can hang beneath a tree or stake out around a centerpost of some kind. Spruce boughs are uncomfortable, but enough of them will insulate you from the ground. In my survival kit I have nesting cans for both drinking and heating using sterno. In my back pack I always carry an extra sweater or something in case of weather change or I break down.If you need to make a shelter, there is no substitute for lots of light line and wire.

    Depending on how far I go, I take a basic survival kit with the bulk of it strapped to me. On the machine I carry rope and a shovel, and maybe some small snow shoes. I like to carry an ax and a bow saw in the sled also.

  12. #12

    Default

    The Vis-queen goes OVER the debris shelter, not under or on the ground.

  13. #13
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    3,175

    Default

    I won't detail my whole kit for lack of space but need to say,
    "I think too many rely on fire for survival" I used to think that way in Colorado but in AK where it is so wet, I am big on the shelters described, usually doing the simple and very light compact sheet of visqueen myself. a little parachute cord with it and you can make a low and tight shelter in a hurry(like two minutes or so). Need to continue on, packs up and with you easily, not a large project to sleep warm and dry.

    Also always have a change of clothes, something wool in there, like old Swiss Army wool pants, etc. and change of all key stuff(socks, etc.)to stay dry, then I plan on being able to stay warm with just the clothes I have available. So if I have to travel, I don't have to rely on starting a fire all the time. If I'm dry, I'm Warm and I can travel.

    NOT relying on communications either(tho I do often have a VHF) I am planning on being able to get myself out or survive a long time moving slowly if hurt.
    Definitely not planning to die of exposure because a cell phone battery fails, etc.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  14. #14
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Homer
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    I love my sterno cans!

    By themselves can get you pretty warm for a few hours... I spent 9 hours holed up under a spruce tree with a poncho draped over me, and a sterno burning under my legs, I was nice and toasty (+20F) outside.

    Also, groh frog, the "PLB" you are referring to that sends messages via e-mail is called a "SPOT" and is NOT a substitute for a true PLB. SPOT works on the Globalstar system, and is not nearly as reliable as a true PLB which Xmits on 406, and 121.5 for true emergencies- it activates the SARSAT network, and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center gets your location. They then start allocating assets to recover you- they are pros at this. The SPOT (if it works- check the Globalstars' website for access times in AK- usually 20-30 mins total per hour) sends a signal to a 911 dispatch center, who calls the Troopers, who call the AFRCC to allocate assets.- too many jumps to play "telephone" with IMO

    Also, the SPOT sends lat/long data, while a PLB sends lat/long data, as well as an actual radio transmission for the aircraft to home in on... much better than having a general location to send a helo out to with no further updates if you have to move.

  15. #15

    Default

    Are you sure that the Air Force is the focal point for SAR operations in AK? I'm not saying that it isn't true. I'm just saying that i've never heard that before.

    Also, which PLBs are you looking at that send both a localized signal and also locational data to a SAT system?

  16. #16
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Homer
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    Yup, absolutely sure, the AF owns the satellites. They then allocate resources to commence the rescue which may be Air Guard, Coast guard, Army guard, or AST, etc.

    Any of the new 406 Plb's will talk to satellites and xmit on 121.5 together... On my iPhone right now so link is hard to post, but google "mcmurdo Plb" and read the specs.

    (39 saves and 68 assists in AK). I don't do rescue anymore, but have a fair amount of experience in the matter... I love a true Plb, since it gives me a beacon to get that lat mile or so to the rescuee, rather than a suspect lat-long

  17. #17
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Bushwhack Jack, Great list there.
    Good thread. It amazes me what difference a little knowledge could make.

    Groh Frog,
    AK Rescue Coord Center: http://www.sarsat.noaa.gov/rcc.html

    Past threads:
    1. Winter survival kit; short thread: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...+survival+kits
    2. General, long-running thread on survival kits. Erik in AK (post #9) mentions that metal matches corrode readily: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...+survival+kits

  18. #18
    Member akjw7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    537

    Default

    Mine isn't a preset kit...kind of changes based on what I'm doing.

    For my snowmachine kit it's a few things in my pockets (couple ways to make fire, leatherman, space blanket, SPOT) and some stuff on the sled. Space style sleeping bag (not a pocket thing, about the size of a loaf of bread), shovel, saw, rope along, extra hat, gloves, socks, usually take the little esbit pocket stove instead of the MSR dragonfly, but depends on the conditions and room I have, couple long burn candles, couple flares, signal mirror, compass, more ways to make fire, and maybe snowshoes.

    also always have - surefire flashlight, APEX headlight, and in my pocket a photon keychain light. All have extra lithium batteries as well as for the GPS and SPOT.

    Vacuum sealing things in small bags is a great way to keep everything dry and organized.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Boise, Idaho U.S.A.
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Here is what happens when a person puts all his survival gear in his snowmobile saddlebags... and nothing for survival -- such as fire making tools -- in his pockets.

    These two Alaskans, who should have known better, came very, very close .....

    http://alaskadispatch.com/dispatches...ving?showall=1

    Although I don't live in Alaska, I often get out into some pretty cold and rough country here in Idaho, and you would never catch me without some survival "goodies" in my jacket, pants, and shirt pockets, just in case my day pack, etc., "disappeared" for whatever reason. Being able to build a fire, along with some shelter are tops on my list, in a dire emergency.

    L.W.

  20. #20
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Hmmm... good lesson there. Thanks for posting that story link.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leanwolf View Post
    Here is what happens when a person puts all his survival gear in his snowmobile saddlebags... and nothing for survival -- such as fire making tools -- in his pockets.

    These two Alaskans, who should have known better, came very, very close .....

    http://alaskadispatch.com/dispatches...ving?showall=1


    Although I don't live in Alaska, I often get out into some pretty cold and rough country here in Idaho, and you would never catch me without some survival "goodies" in my jacket, pants, and shirt pockets, just in case my day pack, etc., "disappeared" for whatever reason. Being able to build a fire, along with some shelter are tops on my list, in a dire emergency.

    L.W.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •