Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: what does this mean

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    481

    Default what does this mean

    what do smiths do when they say they blueprint and true the action. Do they unscrew the barrell? Any info would be great.

  2. #2
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hey! If I look thru this empty beer bottle, I think I can see Russia from here!!!
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    “blueprint and true the action” can mean a bunch of different things to different people… including gunsmiths.

    Generally speaking (someone will weigh in if I get this wrong) they are talking about taking a stock factory barreled action, removing the barrel, machining the face of the action to ensure it is square and then doing the same to the breech end of the barrel. Often they surface grind the recoil lug (on Remington’s) to ensure that it is also square. The locking lug buttresses in the action are also squared up on a lathe and then the locking lugs on the bolt are lapped in to match perfectly with the lug buttresses. Often the bolt is shimmed and trigger work performed at the same time… and since you already have the barrel off… would be a good time to screw on a high quality after market job…. And new trigger, sights, rings, scope, stock…. And before you know it… you have fallen squarely into the “bigger, faster, better” trap of never ending gun modification!

    The whole idea here is to take a mass produced action and barrel assy. And basically re-machine it slightly to tighter and more exacting tolerances than would be economically feasible for the factory…

    Accuracy may improve dramatically… or not… depends on how out of whack your barrel and action were to start with. The only sure thing you will get out of having your barreled action “blueprinted and trued” is a thinner wallet….
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alangaq View Post
    “blueprint and true the action” can mean a bunch of different things to different people… including gunsmiths.

    Generally speaking (someone will weigh in if I get this wrong) they are talking about taking a stock factory barreled action, removing the barrel, machining the face of the action to ensure it is square and then doing the same to the breech end of the barrel. Often they surface grind the recoil lug (on Remington’s) to ensure that it is also square. The locking lug buttresses in the action are also squared up on a lathe and then the locking lugs on the bolt are lapped in to match perfectly with the lug buttresses. Often the bolt is shimmed and trigger work performed at the same time… and since you already have the barrel off… would be a good time to screw on a high quality after market job…. And new trigger, sights, rings, scope, stock…. And before you know it… you have fallen squarely into the “bigger, faster, better” trap of never ending gun modification!

    The whole idea here is to take a mass produced action and barrel assy. And basically re-machine it slightly to tighter and more exacting tolerances than would be economically feasible for the factory…

    Accuracy may improve dramatically… or not… depends on how out of whack your barrel and action were to start with. The only sure thing you will get out of having your barreled action “blueprinted and trued” is a thinner wallet….
    That's the way I heered it too.

    I had Stan Jackson rebarrel my 280 Rem. Mdl 700, AND blueprint the action.

    It will shoot 4 different loads to essentially the same POI, and all at around an inch, mostly less than an inch, at 100 yards.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I'm not 100% sure about this, but I'd say that yes, they'd have to remove the barrel to true the action, but I'd also wonder why such "trueing" was needed? Maybe for trying to put bullets literallly in the same hole in the target, as benchresters do? I've never seen the point, myself, since the sandbagged rests, etc, needed to demo such accuracy never get used for any sort of field work, and it's also never that big a deal to get much closer to the target, or use something besides a rifle to get the job done.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by upto View Post
    I'm not 100% sure about this, but I'd say that yes, they'd have to remove the barrel to true the action, but I'd also wonder why such "trueing" was needed? Maybe for trying to put bullets literallly in the same hole in the target, as benchresters do? I've never seen the point, myself, since the sandbagged rests, etc, needed to demo such accuracy never get used for any sort of field work, and it's also never that big a deal to get much closer to the target, or use something besides a rifle to get the job done.
    It depends on how accurate your rifle is, to begin with, but it's sometimes needed, and/or wanted, for better accuracy, and to know that your rifle is sighted in properly. This is true for any range.

    People wouldn't waste their money on it if it wasn't needed, or, at least, desirable.

    First, make sure your rifle is sighted-in using a bench, and rests, then practice from field positions.

    Of course, as a POOR SHOT, you might be better off, with a rifle that's NOT sighted in properly.

    This is because you'd be shooting all over the place, and have a better chance of hitting your target, than someone who was a better shot. They would hold to the sights better, and miss more often, with the rifle that wasn't sighted in right.

    I guess, it's OK to ignor things that are of no advantage to you.

    If it's "never a big deal" for you to get close, you could use a beeg ole Bowie Knife.

    Good Huntin.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In an easy chair in Cyberspace
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    I've never seen the point, myself, since the sandbagged rests, etc, needed to demo such accuracy never get used for any sort of field work, a

    One doesnt need a sandbag rest to shoot sub moa....I can routinely do it off a bipod while laying on my belly...as long as I have either someone else or a winch to get me vertical again.


    Doesnt make much sense though, to square and true an action bearing a factory barrel. We try to discourage folks from doing that

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Alan explained it pretty well. Is it worth getting done? Good question. Had a couple of factory rifles "trued" and didnt notice any improvment in accuracy. Personally I think a good bedding job will help more
    However, if the rifle is being rebarreled will often pay for the "truing" just to eliminate another potenital variable. Makes me feel better
    Tennessee

  8. #8
    Member marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    I was shooting at the range a few days ago and the guy next to me was having extracting issues so I took a peek. I found that his riveted on extractor, (Rem 700) had snapped at the rivet. The locking lugs had a black finish on them and only one of the lugs had wear marks on the back side.

    This particular bolt action was clearly in need of truing when and or if the owner ever feels the need to improve his accuracy. I had never seen such obvious misalignment on any other rifle in the past but I'm sure there are plenty of them out there.

  9. #9
    Member marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swapdonkey View Post
    what do smiths do when they say they blueprint and true the action. Do they unscrew the barrell? Any info would be great.
    The reading in the link will cover your question in detail.

    http://www.vandykerifles.com/blueprint.htm

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •