Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Reloading data for 300WSM

  1. #1

    Default Reloading data for 300WSM

    Looking for a good source for loading data on this cartridge. I have a ton of federal and remington brass but every load i find online is for winchester brass aside from alliant powders but they only list speer bullets. i'd like to either use a Nosler or a barns bullet I hate to have all these cases go to waste.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    Looking for a good source for loading data on this cartridge. I have a ton of federal and remington brass but every load i find online is for winchester brass aside from alliant powders but they only list speer bullets. i'd like to either use a Nosler or a barns bullet I hate to have all these cases go to waste.
    Thanks
    Nosler 6 has the 300wsm in it... but it is a win case, and primer..


    i have been using it for most of my cases with the 300 WM and start at the bottom and work up to it.. as i am building hunting loads i lean towards accuracy then speed. and all of my loads i work up work in all the cases from that rifle with out to much difference on CCI primers.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  3. #3

    Default .

    yea I am not looking to make a super hot load. just want accuracy. Is there really a big difference between cases as far as loads goes? I know norma makes some great brass but not much data there either

  4. #4
    Member moses42ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Peters Creek
    Posts
    202

    Default

    Brass is largely a matter of preference. Some brass exhibits a longer reloading life than others. The top brass choices for a lot of people looking for highly consistent brass are Norma and Lapua. You'll do fine with Winchester, Remington, Hornady or whatever you have. You can use any load data regardless of brass manufacturer. Pick a group of brass by manufacturer and load some rounds.

    I never mix my brass, ie, some loads in Remington brass, some in Winchester. I use one companies brass. For my 300 Win it's Federal Premium, for my 338 and 25-06 it's Remington Nickel Plated.

    Good luck.

  5. #5

    Default

    So your saying the load data will me the same for the fed cases as the win cases

  6. #6

    Default

    I use 69 grains of RE-19 and 180 gr Barnes TSX. That's approaching Barnes recommended max load - start with a lesser charge of powder and work up. That load shoots under an inch in my gun. Check out there load data:
    http://www.barnesbullets.com/wp-cont.../300WSMWeb.pdf

  7. #7

    Default federal cases

    yea I have seen that data but it specifically lists the use of a winchester case. I am looking for data to use with remington or federal cases

  8. #8
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    PM sent......
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  9. #9
    Member moses42ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Peters Creek
    Posts
    202

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    So your saying the load data will me the same for the fed cases as the win cases
    Yes, I'm saying you can use the brass of your choice. As with all changes in components, you will want to start over with your loads working your way up, watching for signs of pressure.

  10. #10
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    So your saying the load data will me the same for the fed cases as the win cases
    In my opinion, any case will work with your load data, but cheaper cases may only give you one or maybe two reliable loads. Any case is gonna be questionable after about 3 reloads. Every time a bullet is fired the brass stretches and especially a necked brass cartridge. Everytime you resize a necked case and trim it, what do you think is happening. Your losing brass content to the case. In other words, it keeps getting thinner to the point of cracking the shell casing. Even in a strait cased 44 mag case, you should discard the case after 2 to 3 loads max. Better than having your gun explode in your hands with a heavy load in a warn out shell casing. Always check your cases after resizing and check for case fractures before reloading them. Very few guns fracture because of factory loads. Usually happens with improper reloading for the gun or used up cases that already exceeded their life span. Reloading is fun, but be very careful and read all the books.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  11. #11
    Member BrentC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    318

    Default

    The thing I've noticed most with the WSM cartridges is that the primer pocket will expand before the case separates or splits. If the primer falls out or feels loose when seating a new primer, that case is done.

    For loads, I've had great luck with RL17 and H4350 with 168 and 180 grain bullets. Lately, I've preferred the 168 Grain e tip because of a high Ballistic coefficient for bullet weight, high velocity, and great accuracy.

    For 168 gr E tip, using Remington cases, and magnum primers, I would start with 65 grains of RL17 and work up. You'll most likely find a great load between 66.5-67.5 grains. For the 300 WSMs I have loaded with RL17 and 168 E tips, the velocity sweet spot is 3200 fps. I would start with a standard seating depth of 2.860 and once you have a powder charge dialed in, you can fine tune the seating depth for your gun.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyH View Post
    In my opinion, any case will work with your load data, but cheaper cases may only give you one or maybe two reliable loads. Any case is gonna be questionable after about 3 reloads. Every time a bullet is fired the brass stretches and especially a necked brass cartridge. Everytime you resize a necked case and trim it, what do you think is happening. Your losing brass content to the case. In other words, it keeps getting thinner to the point of cracking the shell casing. Even in a strait cased 44 mag case, you should discard the case after 2 to 3 loads max. Better than having your gun explode in your hands with a heavy load in a warn out shell casing. Always check your cases after resizing and check for case fractures before reloading them. Very few guns fracture because of factory loads. Usually happens with improper reloading for the gun or used up cases that already exceeded their life span. Reloading is fun, but be very careful and read all the books.

    While I agree with most of your comments there are variables to consider. Lower pressure rounds can be reloaded many times. Have reloaded some for our 30 06's that we use for practice at least a dozen times and they only been trimmed once.
    Higher pressure rifle rounds tend to destroy brass faster. Have been reloading for the .44 mag since the early 1970's and generally use only max loads. Rarely do I ever have to trim a case and they last for at least 10 reloads before the neck will split. Often wonder if they would last longer if they were annealed along the way.
    Tennessee

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •