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Thread: Building a lift and more, for this Scott Albany canoe

  1. #1
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    Post Building a lift and more, for this Scott Albany canoe

    OK it must be winter already, because boat renovations have begun.

    Plans are to build a lift for the transom, a lining sleeve in its bow, D-rings on its stern for lining, and possibly spray rails too.

    The lift will be adjustable via carriage bolts which allow the meat of the new transom to be bolted high, low, or in between based on the boat's load and anticipated water depth (or lack thereof). 6 to 7 inches of motor lift is anticipated.

    I'll add more posts and pictures here to this thread as the work progresses. I'm hoping that my chief boat-architect (also a forum member here) will chime in on this thread also, adding a more expert description than I'm able to do. He knows how to build a lift and make expert boat modifications, and I want a lift for my motor but am in WAY over my head on doing this modification myself, so we're a perfect match.

    Initial measurements of my canoe show it to be 18 feet long, 49 inches wide, 16 inches tall in the middle (as it sits on my lawn), with a 27 inch wide transom and it weighs a ton (OK, it seems to... true weight unknown). Scott rates this boat's carrying capacity to be just about exactly one ton, and I do believe it; I've carried a lot and it doesn't ride low.

    My expert friend decoded the hull number that Scott stamped into the transom; my boat is 12 years old it turns out; I hadn't known.

    First step is to remove the aluminum cap that Scott put across the top of my transom. Though my boat has seen WAY too little water in awhile, the transom wood is soaked.

    Here are pictures of the inside and outside of my transom, along with my rather large handed helper:





    Notice that towards the upper part of the transom's inside, Scott added a second piece of plywood, and glassed it in; this second piece will be removed next, allowing for a flat surface on the inside as well as the outside of the transom.

    We'll move the canoe workplace to inside my heated garage soon.

  2. #2

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    FamilyMan, I had you pictured as being a little taller. Ha. Sounds like a fun project.

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    I like your helper he will do a good job for you, he is a little short but in time he will grow up, so keep him at, it an in time you have a new partner as time goes buy

    SID

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    A helper men dream of haveing,congrats
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Default my helper

    Yeah, in the past week I found out that he's really good with rebar too. Who knew?

    That boy will be dragging a moose back to Dad's truck just about the time that Dad won't be able to. At least that's the plan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    First step is to remove the aluminum cap that Scott put across the top of my transom. Though my boat has seen WAY too little water in awhile, the transom wood is soaked.
    I would hazard a guess that if your boat spent any time upside down that that style of cap would have captured water and allowed it to soak in.

    When rebuilding make sure to dry the wood completely over the winter and then seal the wood with guality epoxy or 3M 5200. If you seal it while wet it will rot faster.

    It sounds like you are going to build a system like Mainer now has. When drilling the through bolt holes check for wet wood in the core. You may need to allow it to dry out longer before sealing off the top.

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    Default Drying the transom

    Yes, with the inner board partly removed and much more bare wood showing, it will receive the benefit of my 500W light and a warm ambient temp, coupled with my large shop fan.

    And you're correct about the design of the lift.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Ray View Post
    I would hazard a guess that if your boat spent any time upside down that that style of cap would have captured water and allowed it to soak in.

    When rebuilding make sure to dry the wood completely over the winter and then seal the wood with guality epoxy or 3M 5200. If you seal it while wet it will rot faster.

    It sounds like you are going to build a system like Mainer now has. When drilling the through bolt holes check for wet wood in the core. You may need to allow it to dry out longer before sealing off the top.
    All similar conclusions have been realized and dealt with. With so much wood now exposed, an entire season of drying is not needed. Epoxy and glass relative to the scott composition, as well as many, many other processes and materials are available and about to make there way onto the boat.

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    Default extra transom material removed, and transom is drying

    The second partial board is now removed, where the new transom/lift will slide up/down.

    Since all that bare wood has been exposed, it has dried greatly:



    It continues to sit in front of a 500W light 12 inches from it 24/7, to dry it further.

    Here's a more-close-up, without my faithful assistant:



    Next will come the lining sleeve in the bow.

    After that, the lifting part of the transom will be installed, and also D-rings for lining at the stern on both sides.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Good pictures there kind sir. Once we let r dry inside(it better be inside) for a few more days.....then comes the fun part. We'll knock the old glue and loose bits of wood off with a wire brush which will give the epoxy a nice "bite". We'll glass er up to perfection, even match the color paint. I have a little trick to match the interior texture of the finish too. We'll be glassing reinforcement in and around that lining sleeve, and a little "twist" that you never would have guessed. The shape of the transom lift in relation to the beautiful contours of the Scott stern geometry is going to be stunning! This is way more exciting than the work I did to my canoes because there's more work than mine required. This project reminds me of an old 20 footer that I restored with new seats (cained), yoke, thwarts, glass repair, and new paint. I haven't worked with glass for a good long while, but at least I still have some materials saved (I knew they'd come in handy).

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    Default WAY out'a my league

    And those reasons, and more, are why I'm glad my canoe is in your capable hands.

    I can build and do a lot of things, but work on boats is NOT one of them. You're good, and I'm taking pictures and posting them here so others can get to know your skills; I'm not the only boat owner on here that can't do all the stuff they'd like to, to their own boat.

    Thank you sir.

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Good pictures there kind sir. Once we let r dry inside(it better be inside) for a few more days.....then comes the fun part. We'll knock the old glue and loose bits of wood off with a wire brush which will give the epoxy a nice "bite". We'll glass er up to perfection, even match the color paint. I have a little trick to match the interior texture of the finish too. We'll be glassing reinforcement in and around that lining sleeve, and a little "twist" that you never would have guessed. The shape of the transom lift in relation to the beautiful contours of the Scott stern geometry is going to be stunning! This is way more exciting than the work I did to my canoes because there's more work than mine required. This project reminds me of an old 20 footer that I restored with new seats (cained), yoke, thwarts, glass repair, and new paint. I haven't worked with glass for a good long while, but at least I still have some materials saved (I knew they'd come in handy).

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    Default This is as exciting as watching paint dry...

    In this case, its watching a transom dry out. The 500W light is on it 24/7 now:


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    Steve, interesting thread. You been a busy bee as of late.


    Mainer, love the signature



    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Thumbs up members

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Mainer, love the signature
    And his boat-building skills far outweigh his signature-writing skills.

    I've been getting a lot of help from different members on my various projects here, around the ranch.

    As said clearly in a different thread, the best thing about this site is its members, and the best thing about those members is when you see them in person.

    I've just lately read on here about possible member get-togethers in Fairbanks, Eagle River, and the Valley. Good stuff, maynard.

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    How about a Nantucket get together?

    I can teach you how to spend $300 on dinner and act like an *******


    Nevermind. Bad idea.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post


    Mainer, love the signature



    -Dan
    Was that quote made by Washington while he was crossing the "straight but not narrow" Delaware?

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    Exclamation We're ALASKANS, Dan!

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    I can teach you how to spend $300 on dinner and act like an *******
    Many here know how to do that at one tenth that cost, including the bar tab.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    How about a Nantucket get together?

    I can teach you how to spend $300 on dinner and act like an *******


    Nevermind. Bad idea.

    More appropriately termed "m*******" But......if you ever feel gracious about teaching how to spend $300 on a meal (teach by example), I'll be down in Mass. around the first of Jan.

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    Default lining sleeve roughed in, and canoe in heated garage now

    The lining sleeve is 1 inch PVC fit perfectly into a round hole in both port and starboard sides of the bow:


    Note that great care was taken to allow the sleeve to extrude 1/8 inch beyond the hull, instead of flush. This is doe to the Scott's hull being rather flexible at this point; we needed an extra hold there:


    Here's an inside view of the lining sleeve; notice it does fit very tightly all around. Still needs glassing in:


    The canoe is now indoors with a fan on it to finish transom-drying efforts, and to make possible the glassing of the lining sleeve and attachment of the D-rings, and the finish-glassing of the transom.

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    Default Transom is dry! Still fanning it, indoors, to be sure.

    I'm still sneezing the fiberglass dust from the power sander having its way on this wood, but it sure is looking dry to me:



    Won't hurt to keep it indoors & warm, and fan running on it for awhile longer until the boss (NOT the local mgmt) shows up to start the next step.

    I can't wait until next year; I get to keep going up/down the skinniest rivers, instead of turning around because my motor's lower end is hitting.

    Going to be a great year, next year.

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