Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Arresting a Fall/Slide?

  1. #1
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default Arresting a Fall/Slide?

    What's your take on the best combination of gear/technique for arresting a slide? I'm assuming one of the larger axes might be a good option, but I'm sure there are other options out there...

    Accident on Kodiak requiring chopper and whatnot yesterday stems this question...

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Doesn't jake carry a walking axe? I've been thinking about getting one after a couple close calls in the past. http://iceaxes.net/choosing-a-walking-ice-axe/
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  3. #3
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Yeah, his you can't get anymore. I know Marc Taylor sells a collapsible version as well...

  4. #4
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    Breaks my morale to hear my name thrown around like this! Heehee ;-)

    Thanks,
    Taylor

  5. #5
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Marc, I've got a couple hunts coming up and after this happened:

    http://coastguardnews.com/coast-guar...nd/2010/10/12/

    The wifey is a bit on edge and I'm thinking I might stop by tomorrow and check one out...

    Anyone else have their favorite?

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    614

    Default

    If you carry trekking poles, replacing one with a black diamond Whippet is an option. I have one but didn't take it with me to Kodiak recently (I am not the one that required rescue mentioned above). I slipped on a grassy slope (short grass) and off I went. Tried to arrest with the tip of trekking pole which I have successfully done on dirt and snow, didn't work. Grabbed some grass and dislocated my shoulder in the process. The BD Whippet is going with me from now on.

    You could take a normal ice axe (not ice tool which is sharper), but the Whippet is much more convenient. A long ice axe can be used as well, as some forum members use, but i like the feeling of two trekking poles when ascending and descending.

    Just read the article. Scary as we just pulled out of Kodiak on Friday and I think they went in to Uyak on Saturday? Wife of a forum member here I believe. I was on the lucky side, especially since my hunting partner and I have medical skills so we could take care of my shoulder. I would definitely take something with you and look into some non-bulky boot traction, like microspikes or crampons with only instep/heel points only (i think stubai makes these). Crampons with toe points and forefoot points make it hard to walk and not trip unless you have practiced with them in non-snow terrain. Not sure if she slipped while up at snow level or down on grass.

  7. #7
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Crap! Best wishes for her recovery....

    I'm sure that put a serious damper on Lanches goat hunt

    I sometimes think about how easily that could happen out in the boonies...scares me enough to stop thinking about it...

    I was looking locally for an expandable ice ax recently in Anc and was not able to find one...

  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hre814 View Post
    (I am not the one that required rescue mentioned above)
    Yeah, it was my sister in law...

    Thanks for the input on the BD, I'll check it out...

  9. #9
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Crap! Best wishes for her recovery....

    I'm sure that put a serious damper on Lanches goat hunt

    I sometimes think about how easily that could happen out in the boonies...scares me enough to stop thinking about it...

    I was looking locally for an expandable ice ax recently in Anc and was not able to find one...
    I hear ya, sometimes we take it for granted. I'll be taking my SPOT on my two hunts for sure...

    Apparently they got a goat, but I dont know how this will affect his Nov hunts in Sitka/Arizona (which is moot compared to helping a loved one recover).

  10. #10
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    Thanks for the thread. That's HORRIBLE. Believe me, I know the feeling.
    Luke will surely fill us in, but my first hope is that Becca is doing well.

    There was at least one pair of crampons on that trip.

    Bless her,
    Taylor

  11. #11
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Yeah Marc, bad deal....

    I dont know many of the specifics. Luke's been calling my Mom from the sat phone and they are expected in Anc later on Weds. Sounded like she fell, then started sliding on a frosty/icy surface. She got caught on a rock where her leg stopped and her body kept going. Tib/fib snappy...Again, this is all second hand. It sounds like she's OK, but might have a bit of a recovery.

    Do you have the collapsible axes in stock?

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    There was at least one pair of crampons on that trip.
    When in an uncontrolled slide you are typically trying to grab and get traction with anything and everything possible. Crampons are great to keep you on your feet, but they are terrible to self arrest if you are sliding. This is because most people's first instinct is to dig in with their boots and hands, and if your feet are downhill your crampons are likely to grab hold but momentum will keep your upper body moving downhill...often resulting in injuries to the ankles and lower legs. Practice self arresting with your ice axe and keeping your feet up and your crampons off the ground to help prevent lower leg injuries.

    I hope this doesn't come across sounding like what Becca should or shouldn't have done -- that is certainly not my intent, not to mention I wasn't there and I have no idea what happened. I simply wanted to comment to HuntAK and others that crampons are a great tool, but be aware of them if you get in a situation that you need to self arrest. Don't panic, try and get your feet downhill, get on your stomach and use your ice axe to stop your slide.

    I hope Becca has a speedy recovery.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Ouch, hate to hear of things like this, makes you realize how quickly a day can go from really good to really bad. Best of luck to a speedy recovery!!

    Had a similar thing happen to my Dad on Montague first week of August this year. He lost his footing and started sliding on a steep wet mossy slope and couldn't stop. Went off a 12-15ft cliff and landed on rocks. Broke his rifle in half, crushed 3 vertebrae and dislocated his shoulder. My brother and I were able to put his shoulder back in and carry his pack and the deer he just shot out to the boat, he was luckily able to hobble his way out (downhill for 3.5 hours) and make it to the boat, we would have had a hell of a time trying to carry him down. Thank god the water was calm on the way back to Whittier, would have been brutal on him with the back injuries!

    We always use walking axes while goat hunting, but never crossed our minds to bring them deer hunting, we'll be doing that from now on!

  14. #14
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    hunt ak -
    2 remain.

    I spiral-broke my tib-fib in Feb 09. It's a one-full-year recovery. First six weeks off your feet. She'll need lots of support/help.

    Taylor

  15. #15
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Marc, I've got a couple hunts coming up and after this happened:

    http://coastguardnews.com/coast-guar...nd/2010/10/12/

    The wifey is a bit on edge and I'm thinking I might stop by tomorrow and check one out...

    Anyone else have their favorite?
    i have one of marcs... now to get to the rest of this forbodding thread
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  16. #16
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_AK View Post
    Yeah Marc, bad deal....

    I don't know many of the specifics. Luke's been calling my Mom from the sat phone and they are expected in Anc later on Weds. Sounded like she fell, then started sliding on a frosty/icy surface. She got caught on a rock where her leg stopped and her body kept going. Tib/fib snappy...Again, this is all second hand. It sounds like she's OK, but might have a bit of a recovery.

    Do you have the collapsible axes in stock?
    wow Kyle let luke and Becca know if we can help we will... on that... the guide that let my daughter hunt out of his came came off a horse at the end of the season and spiral fractured his Femur... things happen in a second. having broken several... (maybe more) bones myself... i know the pain of recovery... my best wishes and prayers.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  17. #17
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Do you have the collapsible axes in stock?
    on that note... i put a shi t load of work on marcs during my girls mountian bou hunt... never thought of folding up or letting go...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  18. #18
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    on that note... i put a shi t load of work on marcs during my girls mountian bou hunt... never thought of folding up or letting go...
    That's good news, Vince. I'll be stopping by Wiggys tomorrow...

  19. #19
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    As an aside to this line of thought a good place to practice self-arrest basics is your local sledding hill.

    Wear something slippy like a nylon jacket and start down the slope on your back and head first. Assuming you're using an axe...from there you get a firm grip with both hands and make contact with the ground with any point on the axe. You will pivot to a head uphill position and as you do you transition to a modified "port arms" grip on the axe... one hand on the shaft and the other on the head.

    Now roll over on to your stomach in the direction of your shaft hand keeping your arms tight to your body. Now you arc your body (butt up/out) getting into a 3-points of contact configuration--toes and axe head. This allows you to maximize the pressure on the axe head which is what's going to stop you.

    This is not an intuitive thing, nor is it easy. The person sliding out of control has to decide how to employ the axe i.e. the pick for hard, icy surfaces vs the adze for looser material like granular snow or scree.

    Practicing on the sledding hill (assuming the slope is clear of head crunching obstacles) allows you master the basic technique without putting yourself in danger.

    Also there are several excellent videos on youtube
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  20. #20
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    I took a death defying slide this year. I nearly dodged sliding into a deep! crevase. Lesson learned, I'll be utilizing strap on crampons and axe in the future. I also have started using rope and belay tactics in some situations.

    We are not playing around in the prairies. I hope Luke can still make the the Sitka hunt next month. I'll PM him.

    I've got a sweet 12' aluminum boat we'll be portaging over the falls available through my good friend CtP. I don't anticipate getting into a tough spot but if we start seeing goats on the hillside, well, you know how those things go.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •