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Thread: inflatable kayaking in cold weather... logistical issues?

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    Default inflatable kayaking in cold weather... logistical issues?

    Has anyone tried kayaking in cold weather? Thinking of floating the upper kenai in the kayak in a hunt for silvers. I assume it is not that great for an inflatable but I figured I would ask. Mostly concerned about ice, but lots of materials don't do well in freezing.

    Thoughts, experience, concerns?

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    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ht=#post404613

    The third post down will answer your question.. I don't know how the unreinforced vinyl inflatables are, but anything with fabric should be fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theronn View Post
    Has anyone tried kayaking in cold weather? Thinking of floating the upper kenai in the kayak in a hunt for silvers. I assume it is not that great for an inflatable but I figured I would ask. Mostly concerned about ice, but lots of materials don't do well in freezing.

    Thoughts, experience, concerns?
    Best to give folks here an idea of what make/model inflatable you'll plan to be paddling. There are indeed differences in fabrics as well as strategies for getting on river (as in transporting, inflating, paddling, dealing w/ shelf-ice, gear choices, etc.) and then off the river (deflating, transporting, once you get home, etc.)

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    Default No problem

    If it counts, I have done Willow Creek and the Matanuska in November. If I remember right, I did the Matanuska the day after Thanksgiving. We hit icebergs more than once, but had no problems. If it's late in the year watch the ice shleves on the outside corners.
    As far as the durability of the boat, I don't think ice could cut a good quality boat unless there was alot of force involved, or the unperfect situation. They are also very fun to seal slide off the ledges into the water for kicks when you get bored.
    Maybe not the brightest thing ive done, but far from the top of the stupid move list.
    Have fun,
    Mark o.

  5. #5

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    Awesome. I have an NRS bandit II and a Aire Tributary Tandem. My concern was mostly with the elasticity of the materials in the boat not handling the cold. My jeep has a tough time with freezing. I will give it a shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theronn View Post
    Awesome. I have an NRS bandit II and a Aire Tributary Tandem. My concern was mostly with the elasticity of the materials in the boat not handling the cold. My jeep has a tough time with freezing. I will give it a shot.
    The NRS Bandit II and Aire Tributary Tandem (or Tomcat) are in 'actuality' NOT really good choices for any freezing extremes such as nearing single digits.

    The Bandit Urethane is not all that substantial for cold crack resistance... while the Tomcat PVC plus vinyl bladder are not resilient when it comes to potential cold cracking and frost cracking.

    Straight vinyl like a Colman special is prone to literally cracking up (read as like an egg) nearing single digits.

    One of the harshest factors is transporting, leaving 'em sit around, then using these boats in a more compromising condition.

    As rugged and great as an AIRE Leopard or 156... Real AIRE boat is --- a bladder system inflatable is simply not the best system in colder boating extremes. You are better off with a good Hypalon Rubber inflatable (still relatively easy to roll up) or commercial grade welded urethane (that will be like 5 round MMA match to fold up).

  7. #7

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    Hello Brian-- the SOTAR fabric is built for and by the US and ISRALY military, as you well know? -60f??? any one forget that our old problem was the USSR?? 40oz. urethane holds air well and don't get cold??
    Goo

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    Quote Originally Posted by goeaux View Post
    Hello Brian-- the SOTAR fabric is built for and by the US and ISRALY military, as you well know? -60f??? any one forget that our old problem was the USSR?? 40oz. urethane holds air well and don't get cold??
    Goo
    Hey Goo...

    Yes - this is why my posting reads as one option ...go a commercial grade welded urethane... and yes, like a SOTAR 40 oz. constructed boat with no bladders.

    Of course we both know that the NRS Bandit series of any offering isn't in the same league as SOTAR when it comes to temperature extremes.

    When cold tho' any plastic inflatable (even Urethane) is harder to fold up and can be a wrestling match. Hypalon will as well - but in general often maintains a little more elasticity and suppleness.

    Not sure reasoning for any ?marks

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