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Thread: 340 Weatherby

  1. #1

    Default 340 Weatherby

    I am very seriously looking at a 340 Weatherby for Christmas. Mrs. Clause ok'd the purchase but the more I read, in fact everything I read, indicates that the recoil is rough to say the least. I looked at the ballistics and the 340 has around 42 pounds of recoil compared to my 300 Weatherby's 31 pounds. http://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm (For some reason this chart doesn't seem right to me but..)

    I have a muzzle break on my 300 Weatherby and quite honestly, I could shoot it all day long with the brake compared to a half a box before the break so it made a big difference.

    Does anyone here have field experience with the 340? I am not questioning it's ability to take down brownies etc. I am looking more for how manageable the recoil is. It is more important to me to be able to manage the recoil for accurate shots than have a canon that I can't control.

    I know there are a lot of factors e.g. my physical size compared to yours, recoil pad, break etc. but as an general observation is the recoil that bad compared to the mid-size magnums like the 300 Win, 325 WSM...

  2. #2
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvarmit View Post
    I am very seriously looking at a 340 Weatherby for Christmas. Mrs. Clause ok'd the purchase but the more I read, in fact everything I read, indicates that the recoil is rough to say the least. I looked at the ballistics and the 340 has around 42 pounds of recoil compared to my 300 Weatherby's 31 pounds. http://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm (For some reason this chart doesn't seem right to me but..)

    I have a muzzle break on my 300 Weatherby and quite honestly, I could shoot it all day long with the brake compared to a half a box before the break so it made a big difference.

    Does anyone here have field experience with the 340? I am not questioning it's ability to take down brownies etc. I am looking more for how manageable the recoil is. It is more important to me to be able to manage the recoil for accurate shots than have a canon that I can't control.

    I know there are a lot of factors e.g. my physical size compared to yours, recoil pad, break etc. but as an general observation is the recoil that bad compared to the mid-size magnums like the 300 Win, 325 WSM...
    I shoot a 340 a good bit. I'd say it is uncomfortable to shoot more than 20-30 times per outing. Mine is a standard Mk V (no brake), 26 inch barrel in a B&C Medalist stock. Total scoped gun weight is just an ounce or two over 9 pounds. In a heavier rifle it would be less noticeable; I've no desire to lighten my 340. I'd almost guarantee that you would want to add a brake to a 340, but I suspect that if you enjoy shooting a braked 300 Weatherby then a braked 340 would not be at all unmanageable.

    It's very unlikely you live near me, but there may well be someone else from this forum that could let you have a 340 test drive at a nearby range. Never hurts to ask....
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  3. #3

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    I never noticed any difference from a 338, when comparing identical rifles and stocks. But different stocks suit different folks, and I'm not just talking about length. For my build (6'4", long arms and prominent cheekbones), the traditional Mk V stock with the high comb is about as bad as it gets due to muzzle jump, but entirely manageable with a break. I don't own either at the moment, but when I go back that direction I'd take the 340 over a 338 any day. But I'm not going with a Weatherby stock, because I really don't want to brake it.

  4. #4
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    My .340 is an Accumark weighing in a little heavier than 1Cor's at about 10 lbs. I agree with the conventional wisdom that Mk V stocks tend to moderate felt recoil.

    When I shoot my .340 and .375 Wbys, I have a hefty easily-removable tripod on them. I also wear a Cabela's (Past-style) recoil pad. Because of all this, it's not bad when sighting these in. When shooting off-hand, recoil is barely noticeable. When hunting, they feel like a .22 LR. Once you get the rifle sighted in, which just requires a little focus and effort, you're pretty much set. IMO, you want to practice some with the rifle you will be shooting, but if you have a similar, but lighter-recoiling, rifle, your practice with that will translate to shooting success with your .340. If you braked it, IMO, it's recoil would be nothing (though it might be pretty loud).

    Before I bought my .340, I was asking questions just like you. I almost didn't buy it because of the talk of its ferocious recoil. I made sure I ordered some lighter 200gr-210gr loads because I didn't want to fire the heavier ones first for fear that it might rip my shoulder clean off my body. I also bought some 250gr loads, but was skeptical that I would ever want to fire them after the punishing pain absorbed from even the lighter loads. I went to the range and fired one or two of the lighter loads, and said to myself "Heck, what's the big deal?" I immediately put those boxes away and starting shooting the 225gr and 250gr loads. No problem. Admittedly, it's a hefty rifle, but, to me, it recoils like my unbraked 700 BDL in .300 Win Mag.

    I still have three boxes of the 200gr-210gr .340 Wby stuff if anyone wants them cheap.

    FWIW, CorBon makes a wicked .340 Wby load with the 225gr TTSXs.

  5. #5
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    I have two 340's one is magna ported, and one has a break like a BOSS, made by a local gunsmith, neither one has that much KICK. They are very easy to shoot. I like the 225 grain bullet, have shot Moose at 558 yards, Antelope at 597 yards, an Elk at 259 yards. I think These rifles have more energy at 600 yards than a 243 at the muzzle. Shoot a bonded, Nosler Partition, or A-Frame type bullet to hold it together. Once in Montana I shot a Whitetail deer, I saw the jump flinch of the deer, the guide said I missed, I said, it will be dead in a few seconds, we went to the hit site, and about 25 yards over the hill there lay the deer. No bones hit just meat. I have a lot of confidence in my 340's and shoot them a lot. Good luck. Gerberman

  6. #6

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    Thanks for all the good feedback. All I kept reading was how brutal the recoil was and from your posts it seems that may be somewhat of an exaggeration. I am not a huge guy but I am not small either. Recoil has never really bothered me until I started shooting my 300 Weatherby. For some reason that thing kicks like a freaking mule. For the first time in my life I split my eyebrow open two years ago when I took an elk in Colorado. That was a wee-bit embarrassing when the rest of the guys showed up and I had a gauze pad over my forehead. My 300 is very loud almost to loud so I agree with the muzzle break and how loud it would be. I think I am going to take Mrs. Clause up on her offer and pick one of these up. I will probably fire some rounds through it without the break and see how it pans out.

    Realizing there are not a lot of options as far as rifles chambered for the 340 does anyone have a preference for the model? I saw them in the Mark but are there any others out there I should look at?

    I dug up a picture of the bleeding forehead.. Of course they had to take a picture.. It doesn't look as bad as it felt at the time! The bugger just kept bleeding...

  7. #7
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Nice elk.

    What kind of rifle is your 300 Wby? I would go out on a limb and suggest that it's either very light or doesn't fit you well if it recoils that badly for you.

    If aesthetics is not your primary goal, you have some extra cash, and you're lookinig for a hunting rifle, my favorite hunting rifle is one of these: http://www.weatherby.com/customshop/customrifle/44294

    Mine is in .375 Wby, but they make them in .340 Wby.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by dvarmit View Post
    Realizing there are not a lot of options as far as rifles chambered for the 340 does anyone have a preference for the model? I saw them in the Mark but are there any others out there I should look at?
    The 340 I was happiest with and will likely go back to started life as a Ruger #1 in 338. I had it rechambered and Magnaported, and it was just dandy with no real difference in recoil from the original chambering. Like a fool I let it go to a friend of mine, and he had a mercury recoil reducer put in the butt stock.

    Wahoo! You can actually see bullet impact through the scope, even at 9-power. Shooting side by side with a #1 in 30-06, you can't see bullet impact through the scope in the 06, and recoil doesn't seem any more than the 06. It's a spooky gun to shoot now, and I've got to have another. He's since given his #1 Tropical in 375 H&H the same treatment, and it's a ***** cat now, and yeah. You can see bullet impact through the scope.

    I never felt like Magnaporting increased the noise as much as other brakes, but it sure tames the muzzle jump. And that's my first experience with the mercury recoil system. Whatever model rifle you settle on, if recoil is out there for you, I'd sure look at Magnaporting and a mercury recoil reducer. Together, I'm confident it will turn too much recoil into a gun that's a sincere hoot to shoot.

  9. #9
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Also have a Weatherby Mark V Stainless .340 Weatherby Magnum with a muzzle-brake. Recoil feels like my wife's .270 Winchester. Usually shoot the 250 grain bullets, used the rifle to shoot a brown bear and a few caribou. Sure would be nice if Weatherby had one of those adjustable muzzle-brakes like the ones on the Savage Model 111 Long Range Hunter rifles. I like the idea of switching the brake on and off without having to remove it. Read online a few years back of some folk losing their thread protectors, a lil trick to keeping them tight is to add a drop of lock-tight, keeps them from getting loose when you are out in the field.

  10. #10
    Member chriso's Avatar
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    Where are you located at? If you're in the anchorage area you're welcome to shoot one or both of mine.

  11. #11

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    I have both a 300 and 340 Wby, both custom rifles made by a local gunsmith. Both are made up to be mountain rifles and are very light compared to my stock Winchester 70 and Remington 700 rifles, all with similar scopes. With a muzzle break the 340 is tolerable sighting in, getting tiresome after a while. For the 300 (also with a break) recoil is really a non-issue, even on the bench. Without the break, the 340 has sig more recoil.

    When hunting, even with these light weights, I can't even recall ANY recoil shooting several animals each.

  12. #12

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    340Wby is manageable and is one outstanding round. Accurate, deadly, flat shooting and it is a DRT cartridge for sure.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  13. #13
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    The .340 Weatherby is gonna both bark loader and feel stiffer on recoil than your .300 WBY. --- unmodified, side by side, in something like a Mark V... there is really no fair comparison.

    That said... fear not - there is also a measurable difference in performance on larger/heavier to more dangerous game. I shot alot of .340 WBY growing up from about 14-25 years old, a German Mark V was pretty much the best all-arounder I was used to and got to shoot often 'cause most everyone I knew thought recoil over any extended shooting session was relatively brutal.


    From about my mid 20's then & today --- I do all things .375 H&H. Why .375 H&H? Not as hard on pocketbook, not picky on ammo (finding it, brand specific, or bullet type), easier on ears and shoulder... just as confident in terms of stopping stuff in their tracks.

  14. #14
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    FWIW, some .340 Wby chrono results from today at the bottom of this: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...th-Chronograph

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