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Thread: Not a canoe...either.

  1. #1

    Default Not a canoe...either.

    http://www.dngoodchild.com/5333.htm

    What do you think about this Jon/canoe hybrid? Maybe not appealing to the eye but looks like it would carry a heavy load efficiently.

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    That looks a lot like the type of long wooden skiffs Natives used to have out on the Bristol Bay rivers when I first moved out there in the 70s. They were flat bottomed, narrow, had a lot of flare to the side and upturn to the bow, and were built with ship lap planking (later, plywood )over dimensional lumber stations. Almost all were painted gray, and they were powered with anything from an 18-25hp Evinrude. The only difference I see between the "Teslin" boats in your link and the boats of long ago SW Alaska was that the Alaska boats had a pointed bow. In about the mid-70s people switched over to Lunds, bigger motors, and amazingly, a lot more gas usage.

  3. #3

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    The type of boat in the photo was in wide use in Alaska in past years.Before the days of bigger outboards the only way
    to freight large loads in the bush was to have a very long narrow boat.I know of 2 men in fairbanks who have boats like these;
    except much longer-about 32 feet. One ,a retired federal wildlife biologist , the other a master woodworker.Both are handmade.
    According to my friend, a 25 horse will push 2 men and 2 moose plus gear up the Yukon.

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    Default large front end

    Huge bow. What a fine looking craft.
    (If you're thinkin' that, then go slap yerself; I was talkin' about the boat!)

  5. #5
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Huge bow. What a fine looking craft.
    (If you're thinkin' that, then go slap yerself; I was talkin' about the boat!)
    Might be worse if you were talking about what a nice tail it had.
    "Slap, Slap"

  6. #6
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    As sayak said, these long, narrow boats were the standard in Alaska before the big jet boats and Lunds. In the Koyukuk area, these boats were often referred to as Sydney boats after builder Sydney Huntington.

    This type of boat is similar to what is used in most third world countries because of the fuel efficiency.

    This summer, I saw a young man on the Delta Clearwater that had a very nicely constructed aluminum version. I believe it was 30 feet with a 4 foot bottom.....very well designed and built. He remarked that he worked for Holiday Parks [a fairbanks sheetmetal contractor] thus the professional quality.

  7. #7
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Sydney talks about his boat building in his book " Shadows over the Koyokuk". I wish they would have had some pictures of his boats in that book, or else where.
    Anyone.???
    Sydney built his boats as a young fella using a whip saw and standing below a rack and sawing up and down from below.... just amazing... at least to me..
    While in Galena this year I see Sydney is still going strong at age 95, and he still drives around town.
    talked to a couple of his boys this year, both Roger, at the bible camp and Leonard, he was up the Koyokuk at his Uncles old cabin just below the Gisasa... What a family huh?
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  8. #8

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    That's just the type of boat we used on the Yukon when I was a kid. The men would whip saw spruce for the long boards and put them together right there in town. Very efficient river boats. I bought one just like that and used it for a few years. It had a 40hp with a lift and about 24 feet long but it was made of plywood.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
    www.valleymarket.com

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