Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Force fetch or wait for a problem.

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Force fetch or wait for a problem.

    The 1 yr old rescued WPG is really coming along. Just using hand thrown bumpers now with him on a long line and added verbal & whistle sits at my side. Since I don't know this guy's background I'm starting out like he's a puppy. He has a perfect hold but did not respond to a verbal "drop". Within 4- 5 short sessions he's dropping on command. On the first 2-3 retrieves he does a little run by, I step on the line and call him in not reeling and he comes. He does not care to sit so I make him sit, let him savor the bumper for a moment, drop and throw it again. I'm having him sit varying 1-5-10 seconds before he is released. He gets more amped up with each retrieve and Im trying to time it so the next retrieve is the reward. I do this around the yard from different spots and we stop at about 10 -15.

    He does not mouth, fiddle, or drop the bumper before I ask him. He always goes to it with gusto and runs back as fast. It almost seems as if he's had some formal training.He will fetch anything, glove, slipper, dowl, fuzzy toy, bird wing with the same steady hold, though stopped shaking the glove when I said so.

    I started my usual Labrador based "controlled retrieve" steps with a hold and moved right up to fetch off the ground and fetch a line of bumpers with no pressure needed. He likes to hold a gloved hand in his mouth. This is new for me to have this kind of cooperation. He's a little possive of his treat ball it is HIS. He will bring it if I insist.

    I guess we'll test it with birds this weekend. I got the better-half a year membership at a game farm. www.alaskadognews.com

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Linda,

    It certainly does appear that your rescue pooch has had some training, or he exhibits great natural instincts to retrieve. Good news!

    Personally, I never teach a pointing dog to sit. The "whoa" command is most important for a a pointing dog. But then I don't know that you plan on hunting the dog?

    Sounds like a real nice dog. Best of luck.

    Jim

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Jim, Im asking him to sit next to me not out in front but I am going to hook up with some upland bird people to go forward. - Thanks

  4. #4
    Member captaindd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Salcha, AK
    Posts
    762

    Default

    Linda you are doing OK. The most important command that you can use is the sit command. Your pointer goes out and retrieves the bird it comes back to you it goes to the sit postion until you tell him to drop it. The whoa or hold command is used to have the dog hold a point and to prevent him from flushing the bird.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Linda,

    The whoa command is to make the dog stop in his tracks -anywhere. A pointing dog points from genetics and training on birds, but lacking those things you can use "whoa" to stop him on birds. I just don't know many pointing dog trainers that would do so. Some pointers that have been trained to sit will also sit while on point, not a desirable thing to do. I'm sure you'll check out as many methods as you can and make a wise decision as to what is best for you and your pointing dog. Much luck to you.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Member Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    735

    Default

    The WPG form my limited experience is a breed which thrives to please. I adopted one last winter,( Ember ) and at first she would retrieve like crazy. For some reason she quit and I went through the Force Fetch. She is now back to retrieving well. She needed to know that it really did please me to fetch and she caught on fast. I think you are on the right track. It does depend on what you want from the dog in the long run.

    I do agree with Jim, I never teach sit to the pointing dogs. When they return from a retrieve they come to me and stand to present the bird. You can have them come to the heel position if you like, but no need to sit. I have seen dogs who will establish point and within a few moments they sit. That sit movement has resulted in flushed birds before the shooter was in position. I am sure you can teach sit and have minimum impact on the point, but why risk it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •