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Thread: More detailed pictures of D-Rings, Lining Sleeve, and my lift design (as requested)

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default More detailed pictures of D-Rings, Lining Sleeve, and my lift design (as requested)

    I've received a number of PM's regarding my rigging of a canoe (both square sterned and double ender)
    In response to those who've inquired, I finally snapped a few more detailed pics.

    The lift uses UHMW inserts to aid in structural rigidity. They are removable according to the heigth you decided to lift the motor. They are held in by the clamping force of the motor but fit tightly even without the motor. I pulled them down so you could see them better. The wood is finished with spar-varnish (four coats). The adjustments are made via carriage bolts with wing nut (no tools) and uses existing bolt holes (when possible). The simplicity of a stationary lift is a must and works really nice on the Yukon. My older lift wasn't as nice, I've finally perfected it. A hardwood laminate is much tougher than a solid piece of hardwood that is susceptible to cracks. Please keep in mind that the gap you see between the lift and the canoe material is because I've loosened it so I could slip a ratchet strap through to fasten the stern down to my truck.

    The D-Ring process was trial and error, both adopting rafting techniques and a more specialized technique for Royalex and other inert plastics like Polyehtylene. Adhering AIRE brand PVC d-rings to royalex and Polyethylenes poses some unique challenges. Stab-bond by itself will not hold up any longer than one season of hard use. A chemical change to the inert plastic allows a solvent based glue to chemically bond with the hull for greater strength. This process is one that I've finally perfected and ready to perform on canoes.

    Likewise.........My lining sleeve used the same technique and has resulted in no failure. If you try to use PVC cement, or sta-bond by itslelf, failure will follow, when your a s s and all your gear is on the line. (literally on the line

    I was a bit discouraged with the Crosslink 3 (inner and outer layers of poly, with an inner layer of rigid foam poly) hull when I suffered some failures of the D-Rings, but I've finally figured out the process to chemically change the surface area where the D-Rings must go for attachment points. This is a good thing because the lubricity of the polyethylene is a MAJOR advantage for dragging over shallows, and bashing the boat into rocks, and riding over logs. I'm glad I didn't have to ditch the Crosslink Hull.

    ** Please excuse the nasty silt that is all over the boat and the lift stern, the wood is actually striking in appearance when clean.

    If anybody wants their canoes rigged for Alaska, shoot me a pm and I can assist you with spray skirts (made of raft material), lining sleeves, D-Rings, or motor lifts.


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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Here's the other picture of the lining sleeve:

    It's dealt with ton of force from pulling the boat over shallows, my hands even wore out the rope, but the lining sleeve is still going strong. Please keep in mind that this is the point where I again.....secure the bow to the truck, so please excuse the red ratchet strap.

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    your lift , I used a very crude one like yours, it was no way as good as yours , for about 3 years, made mine out of maple from the North East , it work well,

    SID

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    Thumbs up I'm buying it

    Mainer and I have gone round and round about every kind of lift ever invented and plus one he invented that has never been made. I am finally convinced to go with his poor-man's-lift that he shows in these pictures. Simple to install, cheap for parts, and works pretty darned well, in some aspects better than the "best" becuase there's no second arm (the lifter arm) to control when you're in a dicey situation.

    I'm glad he got some of the tiny kinks worked out on the D rings, because this winter he and I will be equipping my canoe with them. Spray rails too, I hope. And if we're really goin' for the gusto, maybe a snap on spray skirt as well.

    With a canoe that well outfitted, now all I'll need is a surface drive.

    And sometimes I dream about even some pontoons to use in July for dipnetting from it. why not?

    Fun stuff to think about. Thank you Mainer, for putting such great ideas into motion. This forum needs more like ya.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Please do keep in mind (for those interested) that it's a morning ritual to know where the lift must be. If you are freighting 3 people and camp big enough for 8 people (like I did for moose hunting season), the lift adjustments will change. The motor had to be deeper in the water because of all that ballast up front, it lifted the stern a couple inches higher and wouldnt allow the stern to "dig" into the water under W.O.T (wide open throttle). You must also trim the motor properly......and you're going places! There is a section of river that I was on (Sid knows about it)......that they call broken canoe. If going down this river this is how it starts:
    1. A shallow riffle with only one "V' in the gravel to enter with large rocks on both sides
    2. A sharp 100 degree turn that goes into a deep cut bank
    3. Lot's of large boulders strewn all through this sharp bend that could destroy your canoe (hence "broken canoe"
    4 The opposite bank is too shallow to Run

    The only way to describe that spot....is like parallel parking around all those dmn rocks while aiming the canoe at that small little "v" for entry while the current is constantly pushing you're boat in a direction you don't want it to go!

    There's no way n h e l l you're getting a canoe any larger than 19 ft. grumman up or down that section of river (during low water).......you wouldn't be able to manuever the length in and around the rocks all the while.....the current fights you.

    Going back up with an estimated 1000 lbs in the boat was a blast, it'll put a grin on your face. After making it through that sharp bend with all those boulders, my motor jusssssttttttttt.......barely had enough go go juice to hop over that shallow riffle with a little 1ft. deep "v" to enter......all the while the current is fighting me with all those obstacles behind me waiting for my motor to loose power. The 9.8 Tohatsu "got er done" and the River Runner Prop Protector sure did bounce of some gravel and rocks on the way through that section of river. The first time I attempted it, my motor cavitated in a hard turn, and I had to do a 180 degree change and smash the bow up on shore on the shallow side so my boat wouldnt capsize in the rocks with deep cut bank. I learned to always test for cavitation BEFORE you start to navigate. I trimmed the motor down (while leaving the lift at it's max height) and got back my maximum steering ability. An Esquif would have been a better boat for that sitiuation because it has a bit of rocker and NO KEEL to aid in fast turns, but experience always trumps the model canoe you have and my boat did just fine. The length of a canoe isn't always a major factor, a fat/wide/shorter canoe like the Esquif allows you some big time maneuverability on the rivers (where a square sterned canoe belongs the most). People get too hung up on big water and weight and often over look the 17-19 ft. range of canoes. An esquif has the same capacity as a 19ft. grumman, while being 2 ft. shorter, 3 inches wider, and over 2 inches taller. It's true, there is no perfect canoe, but give me an Esquif any day of the week and I'll make due on any class lll river with a moose on board.......

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