Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Buoys And Navigation

  1. #1

    Talking Buoys And Navigation

    I know around our little boating world they are not much of a concern, but in Juneau this knowledge was useful. i found this test and it was hard to remember all! Answers later on, first a deer hunt!

    1. White buoys with blue stripes are ___
      1. ice field indicators
      2. mooring buoys
      3. always round
      4. None of the abov
    2. Green channel maker buoys are called ____ and red channel markers are called ______
      1. cans, nuns
      2. port markers, starboard markers
      3. bottles, priests
      4. none of the above
    3. Your buddy says to watch out for the bar near buoy 37. You know this buoy is _____
      1. red
      2. green
      3. bi-colored
      4. non of the abov
    4. How can you tell what color an unit buoy is, even if the sun is behind it and all you can see is black silhouette?
      1. by it’s size
      2. by it’s location
      3. by it’s shape
      4. None of the abov
    5. A fixed marker mounted on a stick or pole is known as a _______
      1. day marker
      2. day beacon
      3. fixed buoy
      4. none of the above

    1. A bi-color buoy, red on bottom, green on top indicates a _________
      1. preferred channel to starboard
      2. preferred channel to port
      3. lousy paint job
      4. none of the above

    1. Preferred channel markers are numbered.
      1. true
      2. false

    1. “Red right return” applies everywhere.
      1. true
      2. false

    1. In the ICW you should prioritize the small yellow ____ & ____ on the buoys over buoys color, so you know on which side to pass.

      1. lights, reflectors
      2. bans, stripes
      3. triangles, squares
      4. none of the above
    10. A white buoy with an orange diamond never indicates ________
    A. a rock or reef
    B dredge equipment
    C. dam or wing dam
    D. none of the above
    11. You’ll find spar-shaped buoys marking ___
      1. sandbars
      2. changes in direction
      3. shipwrecks
      4. non of the above

    12. Which of the following is not a sound signal used by buoys ____
    A. bell
    B. gong
    C. whistle
    D. klaxon

    13. Combination buoys ____
    A. means more than one thing
    B. have light & sound
    C. are bi-colored
    D. are lettered & numbered

    14. Mid-channel, or fairway buoys that mark harbor & inlet approaches are stripped ______
    A. horizontally
    B. vertically
    C. not at all
    D. near the top only

    15. which of the following is not a light characteristic of buoys?
    A. flashing
    B. quick flashing
    C. Morse code “A”
    D group flashing

    16. Only lighthouses (primary & secondary lights) have fog signals
    A. true
    B. false

  2. #2
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    It is amazing how we Alaskans don't really know this stuff as there are not a lot of navigation aids out there. But go to the L48 and you better know this stuff. The Incoastal Waterway (ICW) also has its own set of markers.

    Good thread!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  3. #3

    Thumbs up Start w/boating class...

    If you take the boater safety class you get introduced to all this stuff. It's amazing how many people don't take the class even though they will spend thousands on a boat that can take them into serious danger if they don't know what they are doing.

    (The last guy I towed had a brand new boat and all the accessories, didn't know how to use his radio, he could wave his arms for an hour no problem...)

    There is a good book called "How to Read Nautical Charts", along with many others, at most all book stores.

  4. #4
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    202

    Default

    I ran into this when renting a boat in FL. The guy asked me a simple question (what color and shape is the marker on the left when coming from the ocean) and the only reason I answered is that I had a mental picture coming into Seward harbor and it has a green square marker on the break water.
    In Florida keys you better know your navaids, as it's **** shallow (don't ask me how I know).
    I'm taking the boating class right now

  5. #5
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Took the safety course a couple of years ago and forgot most of the buoy stuff. The one rule I have never forgot is Red Right Return. Most every harbor or sea port has a red and green can or buoy marking the channel; when you return to port the red buoy should be to starboard. The one buoy rule I adhere to is avoid hitting or running over the green shrimp pot buoys in Passage Canal. Not sure why people insist on using green buoys, in low light it’s practically impossible to see them.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  6. #6
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    This is a good book and was used in a course I took.



    Also who does not have this on board their boat? It is required to have a copy on board.


    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  7. #7

    Wink Only large boats...

    It's only required if your boat is a certain length or larger, 40ft I believe.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Actually, a copy of the Navigation Rules is not required to be carried aboard any recreational boat in Alaska...good idea? Yes. Required? No. The requirement to carry Navigation Rules applies to Inland Waters only; Alaska has no Inland Waters Sec. 80.1705 The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all the sounds, bays, harbors, and inlets of Alaska.

  9. #9
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default

    red, right, return
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  10. #10
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CG Boating Safety View Post
    Actually, a copy of the Navigation Rules is not required to be carried aboard any recreational boat in Alaska...good idea? Yes. Required? No. The requirement to carry Navigation Rules applies to Inland Waters only; Alaska has no Inland Waters Sec. 80.1705 The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all the sounds, bays, harbors, and inlets of Alaska.
    Didn't realize this. although if you are in the L48 say on the east coast or ICW, or the PNW and a boat length of 12 meters (39.37 feet) are required to have a copy on board.

    Where does it say recreation boats are exempt?

    Where does it say Alaska is exempt?

    Why does the USCG require it on the ICW? If it is required on the ICW, what about the inside passage in SE?

    33CFR 88:
    § 88.05 Copy of Rules
    After January 1, 1983, the operator of each self-propelled vessel 12 meters or more in length shall carry on board and maintain for ready reference a copy of the Inland Navigation Rules.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Didn't realize this. although if you are in the L48 say on the east coast or ICW, or the PNW and a boat length of 12 meters (39.37 feet) are required to have a copy on board.

    Where does it say recreation boats are exempt? Good question...and you are exactly correct regarding your comment above; however, in Alaska there are no Inland Waters designated...and carrying a copy of the Inland Rules (33 CFR Ch.1 Sec. 88.05) for recreational boats 12 meters and over only applies on Inland Waters.

    Where does it say Alaska is exempt? There is no requirement to carry a copy of the Inland Rules on International Waters and Alaska (33 CFR Ch.1 Sec. 80.1705) is determined to be International Waters only.


    Why does the USCG require it on the ICW? If it is required on the ICW, what about the inside passage in SE? Same answer; ICW is under Inland Rules...the Inside Passage in SE is not.

    33CFR 88:
    § 88.05 Copy of Rules
    After January 1, 1983, the operator of each self-propelled vessel 12 meters or more in length shall carry on board and maintain for ready reference a copy of the Inland Navigation Rules.
    Personally, I think the confusion between the Inland Rules and the International Rules results from mariners assuming that just because a body of water/waterway is located "inland" then the Inland Rules apply...(they should have named the Inland Rules something else, eh?) Hope this helps! Mike

  12. #12
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    Thanks Mike.

    So Alaskan boaters are not subject to the rules. So if this is correct, what rules if any are we suppose to be regulated by?

    You stated "The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all the sounds, bays, harbors, and inlets of Alaska. " What are these?

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Thanks Mike.

    So Alaskan boaters are not subject to the rules. So if this is correct, what rules if any are we suppose to be regulated by?

    You stated "The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all the sounds, bays, harbors, and inlets of Alaska. " What are these?
    Alaskan boaters are subject to the International Rules (72 COLREGS)...not the Inland Rules. The Navigation Rules book is set up with both. In Alaska, it's all International Waters so you have to comply with the International Rules and there is no requirement for recreational boats to carry a copy of International Rules; it's an Inland Rule only, therefore carraige of Inland Rules does not apply. Sorry if I'm not explaining this very well....Mike

  14. #14
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    Thanks Mike. Just want to be fully informed.........

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  15. #15

    Default

    Well if you beleive that this info is only good for larger boats well how about in a fog or at night when some one is hurt and you have to get back to save them. Knowing what they mean or what to do becomes very important. We are all fairweather boaters, but when that don't work you still need to know how to survive. It's not the sunny calm days that tend to hurt. The GPS also marks these as Nav Aids.
    Answers are
    1.= B
    2.= A
    3.= Greeen marks are odd, red ones are even.
    4.= C unit green bouys are cylindrical, unit red bouys are conical
    5.=B
    6.= A daymarks may be bi-colored
    7.= B
    8.= b
    9. =C
    10.= D
    11.= D
    12.= D
    13.= B
    14.=B
    15.= D
    16.= B

  16. #16
    Member captaindd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Salcha, AK
    Posts
    762

    Default

    http://www.alaskawatersconsulting.co...er_100_ton.htm Maybe I am not getting the drift of what Inland Waters are. Back in the 80's I got my Master Of Inland Water LC because all my sea time was on rivers and in Prince William Sound. The rules of the Road Test was all Inland Waters but I had to know International Rules also. So you are saying all the lights and signs in Prince William Sound are international and not inland.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default

    This is one of those "terminology conundrums"...it's really difficult to explain and even more difficult to have an accurate understanding since the word "Inland" has so many applications. The Navigation Rules are divided into International and Inland; when you open the publication, you'll see the International Rule on the left hand page and the corresponding Inland Rule on the right hand page. Only the International Navigation Rules apply in Alaska as I mentioned in a previous post. Incidentally, they apply to all watercraft, not just larger boats...(the requirement to carry a copy of the Inland Rules on a recreational boat only applies to vessels over 12 meters operating where the Inland Navigation Rules apply - again, not in Alaska).

    The definition of "inland waters" from a quick West law search:
    Home > Library > Law & Legal Issues > Law Encyclopedia

    This entry contains information applicable to United States law only.


    Canals, lakes, rivers, water courses, inlets, and bays that are nearest to the shores of a nation and subject to its complete sovereignty.
    Inland waters, also known as internal waters, are subject to the total sovereignty of the country as much as if they were an actual part of its land territory. A coastal nation has the right to exclude foreign vessels, subject to the right of entry in times of distress.
    Whether or not particular waters are to be regarded as inland waters has traditionally been dependent upon historical and geographical factors. Certain types of shoreline configurations have been regarded as confining bodies of water, such as bays. In addition, there has been a recognition that other areas of water that are closely connected to the shore may be regarded as inland waters based upon the manner in which they have been treated by the coastal nation, although they do not meet any exact geographical test. Historic title to inland waters can be claimed only in situations when the coastal nation has asserted and maintained dominion and control over those waters.

    So, a confusing situation just became more confusing, eh? Basically, we apply International Rules to inland waters and as captaindd asks in his post, "...So you are saying all the lights and signs in Prince William Sound are international and not inland." And, sir, the answer is "Yes, as applied in accordance with the International Rules of Navigation 72 COLREGS." Then we throw in "Coastal Waters", "Terrritorial Seas", "High Seas"....if you want stick your head under a faucet, it's all just water....depending on where you are standing at the time as to what we call it! Boat Safe! Mike

  18. #18
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CG Boating Safety View Post
    ...if you want stick your head under a faucet, it's all just water....depending on where you are standing at the time as to what we call it! Boat Safe! Mike
    Love it!!! I'll bring my mask and snorkel!!!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •