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Thread: Siglin sleds

  1. #1
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    Default Siglin sleds

    I'm interested in picking up a Siglin sled and I'm hoping for some advice. I have a cabin west of Flathorn and take the gasline trail over. It gets pretty bumpy and the culvert sleds I've always used perform well but get pretty pounded.

    I like the Crossfox design because it's deeper and would seem to be better in overflow & deep snow, but I'm thinking the standard sled would handle washboard-type rough terrain better. Anyone have experience with these sleds? Is the Crossfox going to flex like the lower-profile sleds?

    blt

  2. #2
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    For Pt MacKenzie and the river trails a ski sled like an Alaska Bush Sled will be better in the bumps. All you have to do is watch all the other sleds on the trails. You'll see which works better very quickly. If you're breaking trail? Different story. Different sleds have different strengths.

  3. #3
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    I have a buddy that has an Alaska Bush Sled and it looks like a great sled, and my culvert sled has performed well for years. But what I'm looking for is something that doesn't pound the crap out of whatever I'm hauling, which both of those sleds do. I've heard that the Siglin sleds tend to flex and follow the contours of the bumps instead of riding up and slamming down like a rigid sled does. My main question is, while the lower profile Siglin sled probably flexes more, does the Crossfox Siglin sled flex enough for those conditions.

  4. #4
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    They will flex and run just fine. Everything still gets pounded. The wide tongue is nice to block some of the overflow. I put the Apocalypse Designs bag on top of my sled. You can look at my profile to see what the bags look like. I can't figure out how to upload one to this post.

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Here are the pics from the polardds profile page



  6. #6
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    The best riding sleds I've ever seen on hard, bumpy conditions have long decks with rear skis and steerable front skis. Two points of contact with a long bed in between. Like the Mark and Michelle sleds lots of guys on the Yentna use. They're great trail haulers but not what you want in soft snow. The Siglins shine in soft conditions. They're probably the best you can get for that. A guy has to figure out what he needs for the conditions and loads he'll see. I've got a lot of miles with culvert type sleds. I still have a couple and always will but I have ski sleds for the majority of what I do, including heavy freighting and casual weekend pulling. For the big hauls I pick my days around the trail conditions. On weekends my loads are light enough that even a couple of feet of snow don't cause me too much trouble. The ATEC and Bush Sled designs with the cargo box connected to the tongue are the best weekend sleds I've used. If you're pulling stuff on the Pt Mac and Flathorn trails all winter there's nothing that will smooth out the trail enough to keep from pounding except slowing down, and even that isn't enough when those trails get really bumped up.

    A carton of eggs and a 12 pack of beer are the best items to figure out what sled does what. If you can get eggs and beer to the cabin in their standard packaging without making a mess you're doing good.

  7. #7
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    Default lots of info on the forum

    We've got a couple of threads that maybe the mods can dig up and move up front again on how to build your own UHMW sled. I like supporting local business, but can't see spending that much money to get a sled built for you that you can easily do yourself.
    As far as sleds go, I've used steel and aluminum tubs, Fold-a-sleds, sleds with rigid mounted skis, and a monstrosity of light weight garbage that a local Ski-doo shop used to sell with articulating skis. That thing broke more often than it got pulled.
    Of all the sleds I've used, the only one I have are the UHMW tubs, what you call a Siglin. They pull extremely smooth, are quiet, and flex with the trail. Breakables like eggs either go in the middle or further back. Yes, you can still break them, but normally they do well where I go.
    I saw a couple for sale this past summer for a few hundred bucks. I did not buy them as I currently have 3 good ones. You might advertise that you are looking for a good used Siglin or Northern Sled Works sled and see what pops up.

  8. #8
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    the cross fox sled is a good one after watching how they ride and how easy they are to pull i went and bought one for this winter. a little pricey for what they are but great sleds none the less. I would reccommend the spring loaded hitch, a little nice for starts and stops and prpbably better for your hitch/tunnel.

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