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Thread: My pup made a meal out of my kill . . .

  1. #1
    Member kylemac's Avatar
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    Question My pup made a meal out of my kill . . .

    OK – during a weekend grouse hunt my GSP, Max, immediately picked up the first fallen, but still flapping spruce and I noted he seemed to mouth the bird a bit much. But he surrendered the bird as he should, so I was still just happy he reacted somewhat in-line with his responsibilities.

    When I dropped the second spruce – Max busted through the brush and picked it up as well. All was good. But as I stepped forward signaling for him to come – he bolted away from me. After getting a little distance – he began tearing the bird apart. Naturally, I attempted to gain control, but he’s just a hair quicker and a tad more agile than I am. Regardless of how loudly I scolded him for his temporary insanity – he continued his meal safely 20 yards away out of reach. He ate the whole thing – everything but one wing. It crossed my mind to shoot him on the spot -- maybe just in the rear -- Little frustrating to say the least.

    Now I am afraid to take him out again – until I know how to correct this.
    Suggestions
    Thanks.

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Grouse must taste better than ducks to dogs too. Only time my lab ever tryed to take off with a bird it was with grouse. Fortunately I caught him right away both times and was able to correct. I would suggest proper use of a training collar. At least then you can reach out and touch him.

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    Mr. Max did a bad thing. He's clearly taking possession of YOUR bird. The short answer is...Force Fetch training and the use of an e-collar. Since your dog happens to be a pointer, I'd make the e-collar a Tri-Tronics Upland Special with a beeper that will help you find your dog when he's in the thick stuff on point. Max did what is natural, but you need to nip this in the bud. He needs to know who owns those birds. And once he's bringing them to you it wouldn't hurt to let him possess them for a bit longer as long as he's not biting down on the bird and you have control of him. When he does the right thing he's allowed to hold onto the bird a bit longer while you praise him. Do the wrong thing with MY bird and I'll chase you down somehow and get my bird. Don't shoot him. GSPs (and some other dogs) do these things.

    Jim

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    Grouse must taste better than ducks to dogs too. Only time my lab ever tryed to take off with a bird it was with grouse. Fortunately I caught him right away both times and was able to correct. I would suggest proper use of a training collar. At least then you can reach out and touch him.
    my chessy is the same way.. don't touch the duck.. but will chomp right down on a grouse if i let him... but will NOT touch it once it has made my posession..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    I 2nd force fetching him, and near the end when you're force fetching on birds I'd make sure you included a spruce hen and a ptarmigan.

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    You need a lot more work with reconditioning, starting over with "conditioned retrieve" and if you do not know how to do it, don't try it with just some verbal instruction. At this point the direction of a seasoned amature or a good pro is in order. With the wrong timing and too much heat you can end up with a rescue like I had, burned to heck by a trainer. Her responses made it pretty obvious that someone with limited knowledge and a hot e-collar had ruined her. This is something you cannot correct on a hunt and maybe it's something that you, already pissed off, shouldn't do. Proper e-collar training, the way the best pros and amatures do it is not to just slap the collar on. There are a lot of steps before collar is used alone. Done wrong will make the dog bolt. I'm just working on that with a year old WPG and Im seeing a big difference between Versitile dogs and Labradors. The drive is different, a bit softer while the energy level is higher. Like there is a party going on in his head all the time.

    The first thing that has to be established is a reliable recall with the collar on but that takes careful training. Not to be concerned with bringing the bird to hand but coming to you under any conditions. I would think that with what you described you dog may be done for the year and needs several weeks of yard work. If your not already in a club, their are clubs listed at www.alaskadognews.com in the Club listing pdf. where you can find some help with your particular breed.

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    Member kylemac's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the insight, folks -- very helpful.

    Didn't plan to shoot the poor guy for real -- though he'd probably rather I had as opposed to the cold shoulder I gave him for the next 6 hours or so.

    He has likely busted his last bit of brush in any official hunting capacity for the year. He got a good taste for brush and birds -- apparently too much of a taste. So I will hold off again until his training is further along. I still plan to send him to a pro in the spring. He'll be back next fall.

    Thanks again.

  8. #8

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    Sorry for the loss of your bird. LOL I would have to ask how thorough is your obedience. Obedience is not just a drill; it's for a lifetime. You must be willing to correct at any time. A lot of issues occur because of holes or inconsistency in obedience.
    Also, preseason training to work out issues is a must. Most folks don't have access to birds all the time. So they wind up training on the first bird down. Frustrating nontheless.
    Don't try to fix this with an ecollar at this time. The dog may or may not understand the correction. There is some collar conditioning that needs to be done. An ecollar( when used properly) is just another tool for training. Just like a leash, choke chain, heeling stick and etc. The dog needs to understand how to get out of the pressure. If the dog isn't taught how to get out of the pressure then bad things can happen. The dogs learn through proper conditioning that responding to the command stops the pressure. With practice and consistency they respond quicker to commands given. Once basics have been covered on low stimulus situations the you proof your training by gradually introducing more exciting situations. Eventually building up to where your dog responds the same with birds as well as bumpers.
    Force Fetch also is another consideration. But I would always make sure my basics are thorough before starting.

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    Oh how cruel, the cold shoulder, LOL, and here I'm thinking something old school A-70 high 5 method. Some still use it. Anyway, What Baron said but he didn't mention that after stopping the pressure they get a reward beyond just relieving the pressure. They get bird, praise, happy bumper, love: so it's crystal clear and they want to get to that happy place faster. He does it he just didn't mention it.

  10. #10

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    Yeah. What Linda said.
    Hey I can't give away everything.

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