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Thread: Bringing the dog

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    Member CaptNemo's Avatar
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    Default Bringing the dog

    Hello everybody, I am looking to purchase or build a sled for bringing the dog with us to the cabin. We have a large (105 lbs) german shepard who is getting along in years and just cant run along on the 20 mile trip to the cabin. We built a kennel to attach to the front of our freight sled last year but think he may have got a touch of exhaust fumes at times. Any ideas or suggestions to keep from gassing the dog and still bring him along would be greatly appreciated. Thanks CN

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    oh oh oh oh oh oh my dog wants to go too...she is quite the pansy though. Her hair is not very thick for a lab. She is only 65 pounds. I was thinking of putting her kennel in a rubber tub sled, strapping it down, and letting her get in it when she gets cold or too tired to run further. Holding her on the seat just isn't very fun to ride and she gets cold.

    I didn't think about the exhaust fumes though...that might be an issue. I intended to keep her kennel wrap on the kennel but would the fumes still get in there?

    I guess that I could crawl into her kennel and have the wife pull me around to see....that sounds pretty scary - maybe I can use a bird or something - - - LOL.

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    The only way you are not going to gas you’re dog is to use a very long toe bar or a tall air vent. The other problem is bumps and the dog getting thrown around in the pull sled. If you still looking for a sled I may have one that will work for you. 32 inch wide, 8 feet long, 16 inch high. All aluminum except for the toe bar and uhmw on the bottom.

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    Member Berto's Avatar
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    i have used a Magnum Otter sled with cover. i just put my dog's travel kennel in it along with our other gear and away i go. so far no dead doggie upon arrival at destination!

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    I use a regular dog kennel made for airline travel, a pad stuck in with snaps for a bottom cushion and insulation for the dog's feet, and a kennel cover from Sportsman's Warehouse. The cover has zippers and vents so I can allow ventilation as needed for different outside temperatures. I strap it on a Bush Sled or Atec sled depending on which I'm pulling. Both sleds have articulating cargo beds that work with the sled hitch to keep the cargo bed level. They ride great and my dog is always excited to go. Down to -20* temps are no problem. We use a dog jacket when it gets near zero but above that our Golden Retriever is happier with nothing on. The Big Su and Yentna trails are easy on the dog at 25-30 mph. Faster where its smooth, slower where its rough. We do it every winter weekend without any problems. Fumes have never bothered our dog. I always leave the kennel door facing backwards. I have a bunch of friends that do variations of the same thing. No big deal.

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    A pic I posted on a similar thread a long time ago.


    005.JPG

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    Member CaptNemo's Avatar
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    Thanks for the ideas. Our setup last year was similar to Mr. Pids outfit, maybe our old bearcats just put out more exhaust fumes than most other machines because Dog definitly let us know he had enough after about 5 miles. We also dont run the river trail but haul a freight sled across the swamp trail at 10-20 mph, maybe the slower speed is what doing it. I am trying to build something that will get him higher, hopefully above the gas level. Will let you know what we come up with. Thanks again. CN

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    What makes you think it's fumes that bother him? My old dog didn't like being in the box. I didn't give him a choice. The new dog loves it. She'll jump into the kennel when I've got it in the garage to thaw out. She figures the kennel means we're going somewhere to have fun. My pic showed a Yami 4-stroke pulling the trailer. Now I'm back to a 2-banger. No issue for the dog either way. Some of my friends keep the covers zipped up tight all the time. Their dogs prefer that. Mine likes the door flap all the way open. Even when cold and in the powder. The kennel will fill up with snow when it's light and deep. Dog seems to enjoy it as long as I clear the snow once in a while.

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    Member CaptNemo's Avatar
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    Each time we went in with him in the kennel he was sick for a day or two. My wife following me said she could smell the exhaust also and would stay off to one side or the other. I just assumed it was fumes, if he rides on the machine he does fine but he is a bit to big to handle and keep control at the same time. I am open to any other possibilities. CN

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It would probably be worthwhile to check your sled out. They tend to be a little smokey when first started up but should clear up. You may be running too rich or injecting too much oil. A good tune would fix either of those issues and a few minutes to warm the sled up before loading up the dog would be a good idea. Depending on the type of sled you have you may also be able to fab up a scoop on the dogs kennel to pull air from the side opposite your exhaust exit.

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    Interesting. All any of us can relate to is our own experiences. My old 2-stroke Viking was a smoker. My dogs rode lots of miles in tow behind that sled without any issue. Maybe yours is smokier or the draft just right to gas the kennel. I'm sure you'll find an adjustment to make it work. Good luck.

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    Or maybe it's a motion sickness issue, the sled does not ride the same as the snowmobile. I once had a dog that could ride anywhere, except for the boat, he got seasick, last time on the boat for him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Interesting. All any of us can relate to is our own experiences. My old 2-stroke Viking was a smoker. My dogs rode lots of miles in tow behind that sled without any issue. Maybe yours is smokier or the draft just right to gas the kennel. I'm sure you'll find an adjustment to make it work. Good luck.
    I wonder how much exhaust the dogs were breathing. It may have been quite a bit. I suggest testing whatever method you use by sitting in the same positions as the dog and simulate the conditions as closely as possible. I had sled dogs and hauled the retirees to the cabin (with a Viking and other 2 cycles) in various ways on towsleds. For comfort on the bumps, an old Oklelbo was the best but I got a real surprise when I sat in a Siglan sled behind a Bravo as cargo for a few miles: lots of exhaust fumes. Wouldn't haul an animal that way again. I really don't know what to suggest.

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    I was at a party this weekend with a bunch of river friends. In that crowd I counted 6 dogs that regularly ride behind snow machines in kennels like I showed. No problems with any. I have no intention of testing the air. I've been taking dogs in a kennel behind several different machines for 20 years and haven't had any indication of a fume problem. in fact until I read this thread I never have heard of it or even considered it as a possibility. My weekends are better with my dog than without. I do hope the original poster gets it straightened out.

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    Since the dog and a human are both complaining about the fumage output of 1 particular sled, I'd say it is the sled that is the problem. You're probably dumping oil at a much higher rate than you're supposed to. Excess 2 stroke oil is the only thing that will really cause the noxious fumes that have been described. Give it a serious tune up and see what happens.

    As for the kennel, if you have the front completely buttoned up with ventilation only in the back, you will actually be drawing air into the kennel and trapping it there. So if you have smoky 2-stroke curling into the kennel from the back and no fresh air flow through the box, the smoke will just hang and the dog's going to experience respiratory irritation. To ensure clean air inside, you must have open vents on the front of the box, preferably as high as you can get them. Constant flow through of outside air is the only way you'll keep the inside air clean.
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    I'd be much more concerned with the quality of the ride on the sled than with the air quality. But again, that's based on my own experiences. My sleds have evolved from culverts that pounded the dogs to what you see in my picture, with a few others in between. My dogs absolutely hated going when I had a culvert sled. Finally I got an ATEC sled like the one in my picture that doesn't have shocks. That is the best pulling sled I've ever tried. It was showing its age so I had another one built with shocks. The problem with the shocks is that they need more weight to compress the springs. Oops. Maybe I can find softer springs. I'll figure something out. I can't imagine a better sled for pulling a dog kennel, both for the dog and for the guy on the machine. Bush Sleds are almost as good.

    Now that I think about it several of my friends put their kennels on the sled so the door faces the side. I haven't paid any attention to whether that side is opposite the exhaust side or not, but that may be a solution for Capt Nemo. Put the door on the left side instead of forward or backward. Maybe it'll help.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    I take my dogs in the kennel all the time behind the snow machine. Ive had no problem. My Tundra smokes a bit when she first fires up but it runs pretty clean once it gets going. Keep in mind that there's no suspension back there so keep the kennel close to the back and really pad the heck out of the kennel so there some cushion for them. And give them breaks often. My dogs love to run along with the snowmachine, and when they start to slow down, or act cold back in the kennel they go and they have never acted like they didn't want to get back it.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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    Default Dog to cabin

    It is 80 miles one way. No way I would subject my do to the pounding my gear takes on the custom sleds I tow. He has been out there many times now but I wait until the trail is in and the ice is thick...I'd hate to lose him in the river
    IMG_2129.jpgIMG_1984.jpg

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    I'm surprised that exhaust fumes behind snogos aren't more of a concern. Obviously our circumstances vary widely. Most people here seem to be riding wide trails on rivers where there are often breezes to dissipate exhaust quickly. My experiences are often on narrow deep snow trails where everone except the first is in a very obvious tunnel of exhaust. One friend who is a mechanic and liked the smell of hydrocarbon fumes in the morning was surprised to find himself vomiting sick at the end of the day from snogo exhaust fumes and the only way I know to avoid that is to keep a large distance between machines. For those who are skeptics, try riding the tow sled for a few miles, any tow sled behind any machine. I think you'll be surprised unless you are in the open with a breeze. While 4 cycles are cleaner, the problem is smaller but it is still there. We just don't smell it as much since carbon monoxide is odorless.

    I wouldn't count on my dog's behavior to tell me what the level of exhaust fumes is or the level of carbon monoxide. They're far too stoic to be good at that.

    Now that I only have one dog, I intend to adopt the solution that I saw above of putting the airline carrier in the cargo rack.

  20. #20
    Member CaptNemo's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the ideas. I am going to make sure the machines are tuned properly, they dont really smoke and havent been using anymore oil than normal but its a place to start. We are running 2000 550 Bearcat Widetracks, I pull a 10' ski style freight sled that is quite a smooth ride compared to the Otter Magnum tub sled that wife tows that will really beat stuff up if not packed just right. Am going to try to build a little raised platform on the front of the freight sled and draw in fresh air from above. I guess I have to be the tester and will have wife pull me around for a while to check it out when its finished. Thanks again. CN

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