Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Noobie fishing questions

  1. #1
    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ft. Pierce Florida
    Posts
    179

    Default Noobie fishing questions

    Hiyas, I was curious on what some of you alaskans like to fish for, here in Florida, I'm always after mahi mahi, cobia , grouper is always a winner . I would imagine Salmon is big up there but I got relatives in Seattle that send some my way. I always wanted to try a rainbow trout and artic char, what are some of the favorite fish up there ?

  2. #2

    Default

    the majority fish for salmon (Coho, Chinook, Chum, Pink, Sockeye) when its the season. We have one of the best fishing in the world for rainbows, char, dollys.. depending on what you're in the mood for. The mighty Chinook or King salmon is the one you'll have the most fun pulling in. I'll be down on the upper Kenai for some trout fishing.. should be my last hoorah for the year unless i can convice the wife to head this winter to seward hehehhe

  3. #3
    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ft. Pierce Florida
    Posts
    179

    Default

    So sept marks the end for summer fishing and then its ice fishing ? also what does it mean when someone says stocked ?
    wow I had no idea there were so many different kinds of salmon .

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Stocked lakes are lakes that have hatchery fish planted in them. Generally rainbow trout and coho salmon.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  5. #5
    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ft. Pierce Florida
    Posts
    179

    Default

    So are the stocked fish, are these still considered wild fish ? are the trouts over fished or something ?

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Nope, not wild fish. Here's the Fish and Game blurb on their stocking program.

    The ADF&G Sport Fish Division stocks a variety of fish species into lakes and streams throughout the state during the open water season. Rainbow trout, Arctic grayling, Arctic char, lake trout and landlocked coho and chinook salmon, raised in the states two Anchorage area fish hatcheries, are stocked in many of the southcentral and interior lakes. In addition coho and chinook salmon smolt are released into several streams to return in subsequent years.
    Generally these are stocked in lakes that have little or no natural population. They use it to provide increased access to recreational fishing. A bunch of these lakes are in parks in the middle of Anchorage.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  7. #7
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rumbarr View Post
    So sept marks the end for summer fishing and then its ice fishing ? also what does it mean when someone says stocked ?
    wow I had no idea there were so many different kinds of salmon .
    Sept is by no means the end of the season. There are some rivers that are fishable for trout and dollys throughout the winter. Several businesses do charters for winter kings out on the ocean to.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  8. #8
    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ft. Pierce Florida
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Lets take a rainbow trout for example, is there a difference in look/taste from a stock raised vs a naturaly wild grown ?

  9. #9
    Member fullbush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,674

    Default

    I wouldn't think so. Theres no such thing as "stock raised". Hatchery fish come from indigenous brood stock. They are released into the wild to fend fend for themselves. From my understanding They have learned to mark the otolith by raising the temp of the water at a certain stage of gestation and it marks the otolith of the fish to distinguish them from wild. I'm not sure how but the females gets sterilized so they cannot pro-create w/ wild fish. All hatchery raised fish in Alaska come from local wild brood stock, they haven't introduced outside species.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    Sept is by no means the end of the season. There are some rivers that are fishable for trout and dollys throughout the winter. Several businesses do charters for winter kings out on the ocean to.
    I'll have to vote yes, that there is a difference ...for first year plants. The hatchery fish don't seem as firm, or the meat as pink, as 'holdover' fish that have been in the water for a year, e.g. long enough to have survived and grown larger from eating the natural food supply.

    Brian

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    From my understanding They have learned to mark the otolith by raising the temp of the water at a certain stage of gestation and it marks the otolith of the fish to distinguish them from wild. I'm not sure how but the females gets sterilized so they cannot pro-create w/ wild fish.
    Juvenile fish can be marked with oxytetracycline, this will put a mark on their otolith that can be detected later with a black light.

    Fish can be sterilized (made triploids) by subjecting the fertilized eggs to heat or pressure for a period of time just after the eggs are fertilized.

    ClearCreek

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I vote with Boatbuilder on this one. Once they eat in the lakes for a year or so they taste great. First year hatchery fish are soft, pale, and not great.
    don't forget Pike, there's Pike to fish up here. Burbot ( a fresh water cod), And the one I really, really want to catch, Sheefish.

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    Sept is by no means the end of the season. There are some rivers that are fishable for trout and dollys throughout the winter. Several businesses do charters for winter kings out on the ocean to.

    I plan on visiting Alaska for the first time 11/17-11/24. I will be in the Kodiak area. Are you familiar with any fishing charter services in that area? Recommendations?

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I imagine that there are a couple fishing. Winter Kings should be pretty good there. I'm sure someone will help out that is more familiar with Kodiak than I am.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Talk to member Kodaikcombo on here. I believe he does charters and transporting this time of year.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •