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Thread: chessies problems

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    Member jdcollins86's Avatar
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    Default chessies problems

    I have a 15 week old chessie, He seems really smart it only takes him a little bit of time to pick things up... but he gets extremely board fast on stuff that he already knows. Should we move on to more advanced stuff or keep working the basic?

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    What are you working on with him now? That'd help as different people have different perspectives on just what "basic" is.

    Thanks!
    Karen

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    Member bluesmom's Avatar
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    I think he keeping him interested is great, but he still needs to follow direction, even if he is bored. Chessie's like to run the show.

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    I have a female 15 week old chessie and it takes alot of patience to train them. They are still very inmature at this age an you must stick with the basic training before you move on to more advance training. Commands like sit, stay, heal, come and potty training are a must. Socializing your dog with other dogs and people is a must.

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    I think it would be very beneficial if you could get together with a training group or someone knowledgable in training young dogs. 15 weeks old is still a baby..things should be fun and interesting for the pup...Training sessions should be short - at this age 10 minutes or less..(probably less)...I'd rather do 4-5 five minute sessions than one or two 10-20 minute sessions...

    Perhaps Karen could help you in person or help you find someone else who could.

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    I'd be happy to try to help you & also take a look at your pup. 15 weeks is still a puppy, but I'd be careful about throwing too many marks for him per training session. Retrieving should be fun at this age & sessions short -- end on a positive, successful note when he's itching for more. Depending on the individual pup, some need a firmer hand than others when working on obedience, manners, etc. Socialization is very important, as is introducing the pup to new places, people, noises, things. The Fairbanks Retriever Club will be holding training classes, but they don't start until March.

    Karen

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    Member jdcollins86's Avatar
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    We've been working on a lot of obedience training, If i throw a bumper for him it will last for about 10 minutes but then he's done. Do we have any clubs or class's in fairbanks besides the retrieving club.

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    I've always adhered to the training principal of throwing the dummy three (3) times and then putting it away. Get pup excited, and then leave pup excited and longing for the next time you might throw a bumper. Easy for a pup to get bored with 10 minutes of monotony.

    Jim

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    10 minutes of steady retrieves is too much & I agree with Jim. It sounds like the pup is bored -- pups don't have a long attention span & too much of almost anything and they'll lose interest. Are you following any books, DVDs, or training plan?

    Karen

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    Jacob,

    Not sure if you got the PM I sent earlier, but I'd be happy to try to help you with your pup.

    Karen

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    I tried the bumper thing with my pup and she did not really like them because they where to big for her. She would pick it up and drop the plus she would not bring them directly back to me. I put a rope on her and she would come back if I made her. I switched to a tennis ball and she really liked it. It is small enough that she does not have a problem with it but she still wanted me to come that extra 10 feet to her. I finally decided to bring my 8 year old chessy out and make the pup watch. Well after 4 or 5 retrives with the older dog I gave it back to the pup and she was alot better but still wanted me to come to her. I was bout to quit but decide to let all for of my dogs go at once as the all need the exerisce. My retrieving crew was made up of Lou Lou a 3 year old border collie, Mikey a 2 1/2 year old yellow Lab/Great Pyrines mix..165pounds, CD 7 1/2 year old chessy, and Dee Dee 16 weeks old Chessy. I would throw the ball using a thrower about 50 yards first dog to the ball was always the border collie but she would not pick up the ball, second dog was CD the older chessy she would always pick up the ball, third dog about 20 feet back was the Lab, he would stop once the ball was picked up and last but not least was the pup she would run the whole distance and follow the older chessy back to me. I made about 40 throws before I added a second ball. I would make the first throw and then call the pups name and throw one to her. She would follow the older dog back with her ball and then would drop at my feet. I did this 5 more times with the same results. I then put the older chessy in the house along with the border collie so that only the Lab and my young cheesy where left. I was still using 2 balls so each dog got one and it worked good. I did about 10 more rounds and decide to quit as I was getting tired. I have already tested my dogs for being gun shy and all are not. I took the pup to the pond last week and she retrieved in about 2 ft of water with no problems.

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    Oooh...the word "tested" just doesn't sound good.
    Lots of experienced chessie folks on here with great advice. I'll add that patience, repetition and consistency are key for training any dog....but more so for Chessies. Adding too much pressure to make them learn faster or because you think they are being stubborn only compounds the problem. Most Chessies are late bloomers and don't come into their own from 6 months to about 14 months of age. I have a friend and client with a male Chessie that is under two years of age. When he first got the pup he said the pup would not retrieve. He worked with him daily but didn't start retrieving I think he said until about 7 months. He said it was like a light bulb went on and he was a retrieving fool after that. He is now running that dog in HRC Finished and AKC Masters.
    Chessies are certainly loyal and hard working. But it takes a strong mind and a light hand to get one through advanced training.

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    Good post, Baron.

    Each Chesapeake I've had over the last 21+ years has been an individual, but as a general rule you do have use a patient, repititive, consistent & methodical approach. By far it seems that problems arise with pups when people try to do too many marks, or jump from one thing to the next without building the foundation for "the next" step. AND, if a pup isn't interested in retrieving on a given day, don't sweat about it -- don't keep trying to get them to retrieve that session.

    If the Chessie you're referring to is who I think it is, he's going on 3 yrs. old now. Nice dog, and he was given a chance to sort of grow up and the "light" came on for sure!

    Karen

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    Patience, consistency and repetition are not just for the dog but for the human too. If you train yourself to react in specific ways in training your timing gets better, you keep your emotions in check, and your dog reacts reliably. This post made me think of something slightly off topic but itís not too early to chain responses.

    Not sure if you're going into any competition but if you are most people get nervous and when people are nervous their minds can run amuck. Add to that, a yacky judge who feels the need to impart his expertise while you're trying to handle your dog...

    The more things you have chained together the more control you have building responses: sitting steady for the shot, marking with verbal cues or your hand, watching for the dogs focus, releasing and then on the retrieve returning to heel, hold, sit, drop. Do that in every retrieve exactly the same and not only the dog but you will not even have to think about it. Don't add anything that isn't necessary or anything you don't do every time. You can add markers like "good" when the dog is looking in the right direction or "good dog" when they reach the mark or returning but don't improvise.

    That concept came to me once when I was at a Sr Hunter test, last pass needed for a title, last test, last bird my little female came back from a flawless retrieve, she heeled, sat, and firmly clamped on HER bird. I gasped a little and my mind went into panic mode, without thinking, I took a step forward, "heel, sit, drop" and got the bird with a little bit of a tug. We passed. It was more my knee-jerk response or muscle-memory like a dance step that saved us. If I had thought about it too long we probably would have failed.
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    I totally agree with what everyone is saying and it took me along time and many years working with dogs to see many of my mistakes. My family owned a kennel from 1959 to 1971 and we raised Brittany Spanniels. It took up alot of time and in the end my parents divorced and I went to college and then joined the Air Force. In 1996 my dad died on the 10th of June and my mom died on August 3 and their deaths caused me to go into a state of depression. In September 2006 I was lucky enough to adopt a Chesapeake Bay Retriever name BO and she brought me back.
    My new best friend DEE DEE III is doing great. She was born 27 May 2010. She bring the balls back and dropping on command. She has a really good nose and has been hunting mice in the back yard. I am not really sure on how far that I will go with the retriever training as I know that I will not have time in the spring to continue as I will be fishing. My primary purpose of getting her is because I love Cheesies and she is great company on my charter boat.

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    Captaindd,

    I'll bet that dog is indeed a great friend and companion and loads of fun on the boat. Good for you two. Enjoy your travels together!

    Jim

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    Just joined -- this is the "Chessie problems" thread, I know, but I have a question about Bay dogs, not a problem I need help for. If it's not right to post here, please forgive me and blame it on my new-ness. Q: is there any reason NOT to use a Chesapeake Bay for pulling my sled all winter AND hunting all Fall? Anyone had any experience using Bay dogs as sled dogs? Also, Jim, I'm AST; we have met before. please e-mail me at ottterducks@yahoo.com Kim

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    Welcome aboard, Stormy Weather! No -- there's no reason not to use your dog to pull a sled winters & hunt in the fall, so long as the dog is healthy & fit. Sue Brown in Tok used to have a sprint team of Chesapeakes - http://akwildwoodchesapeakeretrievers.com/page16.html Another friend who used to live there used their dogs for water/firewood hauling & such.

    Karen

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    We finally found ourselves a happy little chessie to add to the family. She is 13 weeks and mostly a joy to have around. Lots of progress has been made with her over the last week in basic obedience (sit,stay,come,heal), having fun (fetching well), and we are establishing a routine for eating, seeping, playing and eliminating (no crate fowling). We did our research understand the 'nature of the breed and the need for patience and consistency. We knew we'd have a few set backs and we are looking to some of you experienced CBR owners or others for some advice.
    1)Our housebreaking potty training seems to have hit a two hurdles, the cold (sub zero) has caused a condition something akin to civil disobedience. She does not protest vocally however once my shoes, gloves, and coat are on she then ceases to accept/listen to commands without regard to tone.
    My reaction: I will repeat the command, 'outside', lift her to her feet, collar her and walk her to the door and she follows then sit by the door as she has been conditioned/taught.
    Next she will lightly resist, but a gentle tug to the leash and a happy toned, 'lets-go', and we're off. Once outside...
    2) Her urinations are commonly short lived, 'partial pee-er', if you will. Maybe 3-4 seconds, with the occasional 'full' volume release ~7 sec. This partial pee occurs regardless of distractions detectable to my eyes or ears.

    While outside we have another problem:
    3) Remmy loves to chew and eat sticks,twigs, old frozen berries despite having eaten her fill just minutes before. The vet said we'd be amazed at what she will eat and I'm not yet amazed but perplexed on how to get her past the twigs, etc. and onto taking care of her business without feeling like I'm correcting her every third second we are outside.

    With that said, I know she is a puppy and we are still 'new' to her so routine change has not 'soaked' in yet, but any thoughts you may have will be appreciated. Remmy and her family will be grateful.
    Last edited by lineburns; 01-17-2011 at 10:20. Reason: poorly edited

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    As long as the dog is healthy, it should be fine. We were cautioned by our vet to be careful of pulling before you get full growth and development of all bone and tendons. We were cautious about jumping and pulling until we got full hip and elbow x-rays at 2. Our guy is 3 now and gets to do about all the running and whatever else he wants to do.

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