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Thread: 7mm Remington Mag Bullet Weight for Deer?

  1. #1

    Default 7mm Remington Mag Bullet Weight for Deer?

    I am going to use my Light Colt in 7mm Remington Mag for deer hunting in PWS this fall. I will be loading my own rounds, and was wondering what would be a good bullet weight for deer. The charts go from 120 gr to 175 gr. Lyman recommends 160-175 gr for bigger game, naming elk in particular.

    I'm relatively new to reloading, and not the most ballistically informed, so was thinking that a lighter bullet/higher velocity would be more appropriate. Am I on the right track?
    Thanks for your input.

  2. #2
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    been shooting 160 gr speers out of mine with good success.

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    Member moses42ak's Avatar
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    Hunting deer notwithstanding, pick the bullet/bullet weight that your rifle shoots best for anything you may have to shoot. I would hate to have 140's loaded while sheep hunting and have to shoot a griz with them. If you find a high quality 160 that your rifle shoots well, load it and stay with it not switching back and forth for a given hunt. The 160's will be fine for deer sized game and will serve you better for larger game.

    Do some loading and experimenting and you'll find what your rifle likes.

    Good luck

  4. #4

    Default 7mm...

    140gr Barnes TSX is the ticket. My 7-08AI shooting this bullet has killed deer, sheep and even a couple grizzlies. You'll get excellent speed and with the design of the TSX you will get excellent penetration and the bullet will hold together even at the high speeds of your 7 mag. Accuracy will be excellent too. Have nothing but good things to say about them after using them a bunch. Might even give the 120's a try if you want.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    any bullet your gun shoots good will be good for deer, as mentioned above, no need to switch back and forth on different loads for different animals. I have seen deer shot with several different calibers from .243 up to .338, the deer didn't seem to know the difference

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    Well, in general you want the opposite. Bigger bullets and slower velocity. I think the 160s will be a good choice for reasons given. Lighter bullets higher velocity is good trajectory at the range but not for killing animals. You know its not always that good there either. Lots of long range target shooters use big slow stable bullets. Believe it or not a larger slower bullet can out penetrate a smaller faster bullet, holds together better, not deflected as much, and so on...
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    I grew up shooting 160 partitions that my dad had loaded up. When I moved away and couldn't get the loads easily I switched to the 150 Fusions. The deer didn't seem to notice the difference. You could shoot the 120's just fine as well. Any bullet that the 7mm Rem-Mag shoots will kill deer. So pick the one that will kill other things too. I would suggest the 160's.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Member OHTroy's Avatar
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    My personal experience is that the 160 gr Nosler partions shoot the best in my 7mm Mag. I have killed 60" moose with one shot and deer of various sizes with one shot. I like to use ther same bullet for every thing. I don't have the time to go and test a different bullet for every hunt. Reading this post sounds like the right place for you to start with 7mm bullets is 160 gr

  9. #9

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    Like OHtroy stated, find out what work best in your gun. I shot a Ruger for years and it loved 175 noslers, even tipped over a brownie last year with it. I just baught a browning A--bolt and it seems that the 175s are not its cup of tea, so I will have to do a little experimitation. Any bullet out of a 7mm is fine for deer just know what the bullet does at longer ranges if you take those kind of shots. I read somwhere that they used to use the 7mm in the olympics for long range shots and the bullet they would shoot was a 160gr.

    Just a side note Barrnes does make some solids at 195gr. Had a freind load some for me and would carry them in bear country, shot a deer with one on accident and wow. not going to do that again.

  10. #10
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Bullet construction means more than bullet weight. I've seen many "light" TSX's do things that can't be done -- according to conventional wisdom. I've killed blacktails and a moose with the 120gr TSX, in my 7mm-08, and I've seen a heap of other critters killed by hunting partners with the same bullet in their 7WSM and 280AI. The 120TSX is a wicked killer.

    Given a 7-mag, I'd pick either the 120 or 140gr TSX (whichever one shot the best) and hunt everything with it.

  11. #11

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    I'd steer clear of really light bullets, both for their distructive nature on fine eating meat and the fact that heavier bullets shoot flatter at longer ranges. Over the 40 years I've shot deer with 7 mags in about a dozen states, I settled on the 160 grain Nosler Partition for all around best using those criteria. Nice thing is, I use the same bullet and load for elk and moose too, so no dinking around with sightins, etc.

    But I'd let your own rifle do the talking. I wouldn't consider going below 150 grains for any reason in a 7 mag, but your particular rifle might prefer them. Especially with light bullets, premium construction will be necessary if you get into close range situations.

    Specific to PWS, I'd be torn between 160 and 175 Noslers. That's not a bear decision but a range consideration. Whap a deer at close range with either of those and they'll hold together. Stretch the range, and they'll still be great.

    BTW- A just-for-fun close range deer load is a treat to shoot. I load 175 grain Hornady's RN's to around 2500 fps to approximate the ballistics of a 7x57. Really easy on the shoulder, deadly on deer, and plenty flat shooting to well beyond 200 yards. In fact, for a dedicated PWS deer load, that might even be my first choice. Just cuzz.

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    I remember hearing somewhere that the 160 Nosler Partition was the top rated bullet for the 7RM. Although there have been plenty of advances in bullets since I heard that.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  13. #13

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    I've killed several deer and one good Caribou with the 160 Failsafes and Speers, never able to recover a bullet, including the Caribou at approximately 325 yards. I shot one deer with a 139 Hornady bullet that was recovered in several pieces. I won't use anything but the 160's.

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Your talking about deer, right? Not talking about stopping cape buf or penninsula brown bears, right?
    Shoot them lil deer, and they are all little compared to big game, where you are supposed to shoot 'em and they will all fall over dead.
    7MM, .243, .375, arrow, bolt, patched round ball. Whack=dead. Why even discuss or worry about it.

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    Sitka blacktail deer are extremely sensitive to "lead poisoning". That's why I said pick one that you might use on other game.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    It seems to me a 140g Nosler Partition would be a nice round. Thats a shade of grey I find rather appealing.

  17. #17

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    You really could use any bullet weight in .284 for deer. They aren't hard to kill and a 120 does just fine, as does a 160gr bullet. I like to use a bullet with a high ballistic coefficient if hunting up high were the possibility of a longer shot in windy conditions exists.

  18. #18
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Your talking about deer, right? Not talking about stopping cape buf or penninsula brown bears, right?
    Shoot them lil deer, and they are all little compared to big game, where you are supposed to shoot 'em and they will all fall over dead.
    7MM, .243, .375, arrow, bolt, patched round ball. Whack=dead. Why even discuss or worry about it.

    Whats your favorite pick-up truck?
    Whats your favorite color?

    dennis
    Absolutely true. You'd spend your time more wisely wondering which moon phase causes deer to prance more eloquently . When you hit a deer right they die and that right quickly, regardless the weight of the .284 projectile.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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