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Thread: Looking at new Snowmachines this year.

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default Looking at new Snowmachines this year.

    Wow. Snowmachines are danged expensive now. Even used ones are expensive. Im thinking of going the new tundra route with the 550 fan motor and 137' track.

    Anyone have experience with this motor or riding this machine? as I understand it the 2010 is a new bodystyle?

    Maybe Ill go with the polaris in a 550 fan too.

    Trying to keep this purchase around 6 grand, Lightweight, manueverable, towing stuff without burning up belts, good gas mileage

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    Member H20Dogg's Avatar
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    Sounds good, thats what I'd go with with that Budget, If I has 10K I'd go with skandic WT with 600ACE.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I have a 2008 Tundra LT with a one up seat. It is awesome, pulls very well, boondocks awesome! I don't know about the shorter track especially in deeper snow off trail??? Depending on your use it might be OK. The 550F motor is plenty strong with the long track, it might just throw the snow out and you will be stuck?

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    well I dang near pulled the trigger on a '10 tundra longtrack. Down payment was in hand, financing was approved... Wifey won that fight though. Next year maybe... Shes right, pay off one toy at a time.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I ride around on a $1200 2-up AC couger 550 liquid from the mid 90's and don't have much problem getting stuck as long as I am paying attention. I am not an especially good rider but my friends have watched me do stuff with that sled where they were confident I was going to bury it and it continues to surprise. As long is it is clutched right I don't see a problem with a more powerful motor trenching you in, I do see a problem with a weaker motor not having enough guts to get you through something though!

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I went to Bird Creek with a couple Iron Doggers. Every time they tried to get moving, they had to work their sleds out of a hole. Sometimes a weaker motor will allow you to stay on top and moving. My 300F is a prime example. It doesn't have the HP to spin the track out from under it. Works good too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    Trying to keep this purchase around 6 grand, Lightweight, manueverable, towing stuff without burning up belts, good gas mileage
    Skidoo's 550 fan is a solid motor but good gas mileage is not it's strong point. My wife's 05 Expedition Sport burns about as much gas as either of my 800's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    Trying to keep this purchase around 6 grand, Lightweight, manueverable, towing stuff without burning up belts, good gas mileage
    Not to be rude but, you have to learn that a snogo is a compromise, and you have already limited your purchase to two machines. Flip a coin.
    Gas mileage, this one always makes me laugh. You own a hybrid car yes? Best stay at home.
    Towing stuff without burning belts, this is operator error; stay at home.
    Lightweight? How much can you deadlift right now? 300, 350, 405lbs? Run to the local gym and let us know.
    Maneuverable. Define.

    In the real world now:
    You have two machines that are essentially the same. Start looking at the differences that mean something to you.

    Longer track = less agile.
    Shorter track = less pulling ability.
    Longer track = more gas.
    Shorter track = less floatation.

    You get the idea.

    There was a 2010 Ski-Doo SUV 550f for sale locally for $6k. You'd like that. Pulls great, huge track (floats and traction galore), room for three, storage under the seat, mileage is...who cares?

    Local guy gave me a bunch of grief when we went hunting due to my 1999 Polaris XCR-800 tripple. He crowed about his Ski-Doo with a 380cc motor. Got great mileage but was so gutless he got stuck on flat ground; just wouldn't turn the track. My 13 mpg machine did pretty well, and was a helluva lot more fun.

    I could not lift the front end of my XCR, but I can lift the front end of my 2007 AC Bearcat 570 fanner. They both get the same mileage. One tops out over 117 that I have ridden, the other maybe 75. Both pull good but the Bearcat is better at it. Bearcat has a 156" track while the XCR 144" but I can get more agility out of the XCR due to the power.

    Your best bet would be to decide what you want to do with the machine: work or play. If work, then you want it to pull or float? If play do you want it to float or maneuver? Going to bring someone along? That is another consideration.

    When I wanted a work machine back in 2008, I looked for the longest track in a fan-cooled machine. Arctic Cat and Ski-Doo. Then I narrowed it to weight: the Bearcat and the Tundra/SUV/TUV. All had long tracks, some (SUV/TUV), had wider tracks, all had heated grips, tall windshields, 2-up seats, racks, ect. I narrowed to the Bearcat and SUV. AC had 16"x156" track, SUV 20"x156" track. I was willing to accept the additional 100 pound weight of the SUV for the wider track, but went with the Bearcat because: suspension travel. AC had 10" in front while the 'Doo had only 6". Having been on many > 100 mile rides, that plush suspension was the selling point. Note mileage never entered my mind because I am real-world realistic.

    These are examples of decision points. You can find many previously owned machines that will fit your budget, but you'll have to come to terms with what you want.

    The consensus out here where sleds are tools and not toyz-for-urbanites, the best sled is the Polaris 600 RMK liquid, preferable an early version. Great power, pulling ability, track length and lug height are perfect, plus the 600 sips the gas. Parts are everywhere and cheap and almost infinitely modifiable. Problem is it's a liquid, so when the snow is thin you stay at home; only detractor for this machine. I see plenty around CL, AL and 907BBT.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    NitroMan, I have to disagree somewhat with your comments on ignoring gas mileage concerns. Your points are well taken and a person has to be realistic and know there are trade-offs with every choice but for my purposes it's still of some concern. I too have been on many >1-200 mile trips. Range is a concern. It can mean having to take a freight sled and extra 70 lb+ gas or just taking your machine. It can mean having a light sled going through deep snowy trails through trees or a lighter sled. I've been on rough trips (last year actually) where, despite efforts to be careful, jugs crack and drain and people ran out of gas. Going through deep powder with sleds heavy with gas made a bit difference. A machine with better mileage would've not had a worry on those trips. With gas $6-7 a gallon and higher in smaller villages and probably going higher in coming years cost savings can be significant if you use your machine a lot - especially on long trips. A person shouldn't ONLY focus on mileage but I don't think it's something to ignore either.

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Jerry has it nailed with the fuel concern. Im concerned with the range and how much extra gas do I have to haul around. BTW I settled on a 1998 summit 500. Its a little unrully to steer and has a mind of its own. Kinda like an old school tundra. Other than that its a good general screw around sled. Gets good mileage, light, and not complicated to work on.

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    The Ski-Doo Summits always had a great deal of power, more so than the Polaris 500's. I don't know how Ski-Doo did it, but they were quite popular here around Bethel. A few guys had the 800 and it was a monster.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    If you're looking at a bigger engine and mpg is a factor, look at the Ski-doo e-tec. I have the 600 etec Renegade and when everyone else is running out of gas I still have 3/4 tank despite riding the exact same distance, terrain and speed. The etec really sips gas. Ski-doo released it in the 800 as well.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    The Ski-Doo Summits always had a great deal of power, more so than the Polaris 500's. I don't know how Ski-Doo did it, but they were quite popular here around Bethel. A few guys had the 800 and it was a monster.
    Correct me if I'm wrong but in '98 I believe ski doo had rave valves and Polaris did not
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    That is most likely correct. I believe it wasn't until '99 or '00 that Polaris replaced it's older mono-block 500 with the new small block 500 with power valves. Irregardless, the monoblock 500 from the 90's is bulletproof and has decent power. The '98 Skidoo 800 was a triple and it was a monster.

    We have several of the 90's Indy 500's. Probably one of the best and least expensive sleds on the used market.

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    the time and effort and lost fun cause of towing in gas y not spend the extra 25$ in the village and just buy it there .... less busted jugs less wear and tear on sleds and more smiles)

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