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Thread: Kid's first rim fire?

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    Default Kid's first rim fire?

    I am getting close to the point where the young one is ready to go shooting. He will be 4 in the spring and I am not very familiar with what is out there for his age. I looked at a Henry single shot along with a Chipmonk. What else is there or what would you recommend? I want something that he can pass down so in other words not super cheap. I'm getting anxious and looking to get the ball rolling. Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    a Bolt action crickett would be nice they are designed for small shooters with the small stocks are pretty accurate too with iron sights

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    + one on the crickett. My nephew has one as his first .22 and it's perfect. Not quite as small as the chipmunk and a lot nicer looking in my opinion. A good one to get him started on and learn the basics with.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    My kiddos all started with a Henry Mini-bolt. A great little stainless/synthetic single shot bolt action. It even has a nice set of fiber optic sights.
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    I instruct on Junior rifle up here, so see a lot of young shooters. Although the Crickets and Henry minibolts (great quality) are very good, a lot of the kids get fed-up with/forget the cocking pull on rear of the bolt. Although it does add a level of safety it is a bit of a PITA.

    I would look at a Marlin 15YN, excellent quality, hugely accurate and easy to add aftermarket (peeps etc). Mossberg Halfpint or CZ 452 Scout - the advantage of being able to add a 10 shot mag later. And finally the Savage cub is a great gun and comes with Williams style peeps from factory.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    the CZ scout is by far the best rifle of the bunch. It may cost a little more, but quality usually does.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    CZ 452 Scout Youth makes a fine gift.
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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I'd definitely recommend a single shot or at least a bolt action for the 'first gun'. My dad started me with a 10-22 and I went through a LOT of ammo before I really took the time to learn how to properly aim. My daughters became crack shots rather quickly when they only had one round at a time! Slowing things down is a good thing.
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    Check out the Savage Cub, it comes with the Accutrigger and boy is it a shooter. The CZ scout is another rifle worth checking out.

  10. #10

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    My 10 year old city slicker grandson was home from Chicago a couple of weeks ago. We spent a whole afternoon doing a project gun for him.

    I am partial to the 514 Remington and so thats what we went with. We measured him up and then cut the stock off to fit. We then made leaf stencils(drew leaves on construction paper and then cut them out). We made a run to Wally World and bought Krylon camo paint in 5 colors. When it was all said and done he was all grins.

    The next day after church he put a hundred rounds through it and by the end of the session he was easily shooting minute of squirrel noggin at 25 yards.

    I bought that gun for $75 bucks from Wild West Guns as a parts gun(yeah Ken I put a different bolt in it). I'm bettin my grandson wouldn't trade it for any of those others mentioned!

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    I am sure your Grandson loves his Remy 514. However, cutting a stock from a full size gun still leaves a lot of weight forward for a young'un. The thing about the purpose made kid guns is that everything is in small dimensions and bolts etc are made for small hands. Consequently the balance and weight of the kid guns is perfect. I have a couple of full size guns shortened for kids and they are OK at the bench, but real young kids (6-10) struggle when they have to hold the weight. Even firing prone is difficult.
    Young kids need a light, short stock and a light short (16") barrel and action.

  12. #12

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    Wow, great reponses. Several good points were brought up that I was unaware of. Thanks for the info. Now it's time for research. I'll post later with what I am leaning towards. Thanks again!

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    Default I second the single shot

    I got my boy a single shot .22 and 5,000 rounds of ammo.

    The rifle could also convert to use a clip; I told him we might convert it after he runs out of ammo.

    Getting a semi auto for a beginning shooter is the worst thing you can do for their accuracy, especially if they're young.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    My kiddos all started with a Henry Mini-bolt. A great little stainless/synthetic single shot bolt action. It even has a nice set of fiber optic sights.
    +1. My son's first was a Henry mini-bolt as well, now his younger sister is using the same one. Henry's customer service is second to none, too.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

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    Whatever you do, do not get something they will "grow into". Seen a lot of guys get one of the "youth" rifles meant for young teens in a effort to save money down stream. Kid hates firing it 'cos he can't hold it. Get a really good small gun that fits. If you have other kids to hand it down to, great. Worst case when the kid outgrows it, you'll lose max $50 on a re-sale.

    Also start em slow, give em lots of encouragement and get some reactive targets (spinners, clays etc). Makes it more fun and they enjoy shooting. Also make sure you teach them how to shoot with a real gun every time they shoot the 22. All too often I see kids taught slack grip, poor cheek/shoulder weld, poor stance etc. This creates bad habits that will make them hate shooting bigger calibers.

    My 8 (soon to be 9) year old only started shooting last November. Slow and steady on 22 bolts, now he has 223, 308, 30-06, 357 Mag, 45colt, 45ACP, 9mm and 45-70 under his belt and fires each as well as many adults, because he perfected his grip/stance etc on 22s. Had an assistant bear guide just stand and watch in disbelief at the range the other week as my kid rested my 1895 on sticks (standing), tucked in behind it and proceeded to put 5 rounds in a 3-inch circle at 25yds!

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    Another vote for the Scout.
    Can add a fullsize stock later on.
    But the scout fits me when i am in winter gear.lol
    Got one for my 7yr old a couple of yrs ago.

    Thing is a lazer.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I just bought my girlfriends 10 year old son a Rossi Match Pair.
    You get 2 barrels a .22 and either a 410 or 20 guage shotgun. It is a single shot witch I prefer for a first gun as you can control the bullets and give them one at a time.Comes with a youth sized plastic stock and foregrip.
    With the extra barrel you can easily switch witch takes only 30 seconds and they are ready for grouse in the air or duck hunting. I went with the 20 guage because I dislike the 410. Too small and cost more than 12 guage for a box of shells. Also I can get steel shot locally for the 20 guage for future duck hunting trips.
    $158 at walmart yesterday so about the same as a cricket but you get another barrel to go with it. I would have bought at a local gunstore but they only had the .22/410 and walmart was the only ones who offfered to order it. Took 2 days to get it from Anch to Kenai.
    They also make another one called the Trifecta witch gives you .22 a 20guage and a .243 barrel.I think my buddy paid something like $300 for the one he bought his son at a local gun store.
    These guns are break open type and are all single shot. They do have to pull the hammer back to fire but that is not a big deal.I like to be able to see the hammer up or down to easily verify if they are ready to shoot or not. They come with a soft sided case with slots for each barrel. They have a safety switch on the side and also a built in lock and key on the hammer for safety.
    You might want to check them out.
    Nothing wrong with the cricket either I just wanted the extra barrel for the possibilities it offered. I suppose you could shoot 20 guage slugs in it for moose or get the .243 barrel for deer or predators. The .243 barrel come with a rail for scope mounts.
    Of course for all of this you would be there with your own gun for backup just in case.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    I agree with mud, the Henry mini-bolt is great. Nice looking gun, fiber optic sights, single shot, bolt. I didn't care for the keyed safeties on the Crickets.

    Kasilofchris-the matched set is nice. The stock/fit was a little too much for my kid.

    I agree with the guy that said buy the right sized rifle too. No need to get one that can "grow into" imo.

    Tim

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    +1 on the minibolt. It was the lightest/smallest of all the rifles mentioned when I was shopping for my daughter. Depending on how large your 4 year old is: The CZ, while the best of the afore mentioned .22 bolt actions and well worth the money, might be too heavy.

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    Member MACMMJ's Avatar
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    I have got both my older boys (5,7) a cricket. I liked that they were light and small with a scope mount. I put scopes on them and they enjoy shooting a lot more and can concentrate on holding the gun steady and squeezing the trigger. My daughter (12) will be getting a Rossi for her birthday this year, with the three barrels (.22lr, 20ga, and .243).

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