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Thread: This message is for the boating Dad's out there...

  1. #1
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    Default This message is for the boating Dad's out there...

    The boating season is starting to wrap up and the boating accident statistics aren't looking much different than they did last year...or the year before, or the year before that, etc.

    The "average" boating fatality in Alaska is still the 18-34 year old male who falls overboard/capsizes and is NOT wearing a life jacket....

    Most all of us grew up boating where Mom & kids wore life jackets but Dad didn't...'cause Dad was old enough and experienced enough to not have to wear one...(the message here is that once you become 'of age', you no longer need to wear a life jacket...).

    The problem is that we have additional widows/orphans every year.

    Start setting the example for your kids; wear your life jackets! Why not go buy yourself a nice inflatable and wear it? Your kids will ask when they get an inflatable and you can say, "When you are 16!" (Check the Coast Guard approvals on inflatables).

    The really nice part about changing the culture is that you'll get to see your kids grow up and take your grandkids boating! How cool is that?! Boat Safe! Mike

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    My wife and I both have CO2 auto inflatables, easy to slip on and nice to wear. You are right, my son does ask when he can have one. We wear PFDs outside of the confines of the boat cockpit like when walking around to the bow, or when we take the dink to shore. If I am by myself the PFD goes on anytime I leave the boat cabin.

    Iíve seen a lot of guys out on their boats climbing around without PFDs on, this is just foolhardy.

    If you have ever been to the Polar bear jump in Seward and watched how many participants are not able to climb back out of the water without help and it might change your mind about the virtues of wearing a PFD.

    The extra bouncy supplied from a PFD might mean the difference between life and death as you struggle to get back on board the boat with that pair of ExtaTuffs on.
    Jay
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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    For what it's worth, 7 or 8 years ago, I went overboard in Ressurection Bay. I was on the bow, messing with the anchor, didn't see the wake coming and in an instant over I went. I wasn't wearing a life jacket. I had my family on board with me...my wife is 5 foot 2, 110 pounds, kids were both waaaay too small to be of any help (although my daughter was on her knees praying). Everybody panic'd. Try as she might, my wife couldn't pull my big butt on board and after several minutes of trying my absolute hardest, I was exhausted. I asked my wife to help me put a life jacket on, because I didn't know how much longer I could hold on to the bow rail. As I was putting on the life jacket, it came to me that I could work my way to the stern and use the kicker as a ladder which worked perfectly. The whole time I was in the water (no more than 10 minutes), I kept thinking "Geez, I thought the water would be colder than this". Once I got back in the boat, I was completely exhausted to the point that I could barely stand up, but I still didn't feel cold. I actually wanted to stay out a while longer but the wife said it was time to head in. As the adrenalin wore off, I got very cold, very fast and developed uncontrollable shivering, slurred speech etc. as we raced back to port. By the way, it was Father's Day, bluebird sky, mid 60's and very light winds.

    I (we) learned a lot about boating safety that day such as:
    - PFD's for everyone, all the time
    - Make sure someone else can run the boat in case I can't
    - Basic knot tying (the wife tried to tie off a rope for me but couldn't)
    - Make sure someone else know's basic radio ops

    I got pretty lucky, but I darned sure don't recommend trying it.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    landed on my back in the Yukon river this spring when my buddy pulled the raft as i was exiting, PFD not only kept me up but bounced me off the log debris that was in the water around us.. good thing too... that water was DEEP at that point. wear it in my avitar pic... my bino case fits over it FINE!
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Good reminder - I would not be here if I hadn't worn my PFD the day I spent some time floating down the Yukon without a boat. I can happen to all of us.

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    Interestign thread already. I am sure there will be some other instructive stories told here. With all of the redundant systems onboard, I agree with the comment about getting someone else competitant on the boat. My wife enjoys going along, and trusts me to do everything. I am slowing teaching my oldest daughter some stuff, such as radio operation because I can convince her to do this more than I can my wife. Maybe there should be a CG class for wifes or something. It would be a good step to have someone else on board that can get the boat back to port.
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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Interestign thread already. I am sure there will be some other instructive stories told here. With all of the redundant systems onboard, I agree with the comment about getting someone else competitant on the boat. My wife enjoys going along, and trusts me to do everything. I am slowing teaching my oldest daughter some stuff, such as radio operation because I can convince her to do this more than I can my wife. Maybe there should be a CG class for wifes or something. It would be a good step to have someone else on board that can get the boat back to port.
    Couldn't agree more and great idea. For some reason I don't think us husbands are the best teachers to our wives. Go figure

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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    I have a rule on my boat, everyone always wears an inflatable, or they do not go. period, no Ifs, ands or buts. I bought enough for everyone to wear, a number of different models. I am not a charter boat, but I go thru the same saftey speech that should be on all charter boats., Where and how to use the radios, how to read the GPS, to call out the position. how to start the engines and how to look at the gps chart. I have a throw ring on the cabin door, lines fixed on the bow and stern, and a ladder permanently mounted on the stern. When we are 50 to 70 miles off shore there is no one around to help, We must be able to rescue ourselves. My boat is 34 feet long 12 feet wide and has 4 foot freeboard.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerberman View Post
    I have a rule on my boat, everyone always wears an inflatable, or they do not go. period, no Ifs, ands or buts.
    Do you require everyone to wear them in the boat while in the cabin? It seems like this would be pretty uncomfortable. My rule is that kids have to wear them outside the cabin all the time, and adults it is a personal choice (kind of like a helmet law). I try to wear mine all of the time outside, but I get lazy sometimes which I should get better about. Often I am the only one that can get the boat back, so it is pretty important that I stay functional.
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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    Everyone wears them all the time, that is the rule, any questions see rule #1. I think the inflatables are comfortable enough to wear all the time and anyone who goes with me will agree or not go. see rule #1. A boat can flip, sink or a person can fall overboard in a millisecond, A friend had a boat sink out from under him while Halibut fishing this year, by the time they knew what was happening they had less than 30 seconds before they were in the water, not wearing their life jackets, looking for them. He always wears one now.

  11. #11
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    The use of a PFD 100% of the time is just not practical. I advise the use of them 100% of the time in recreational situations (while outside the cabin like jrogers said). In my business if I go overboard a life jacket is the least of my worries. It'll just make it easier for the CG helo to spot my body.
    Last edited by fullbush; 09-27-2010 at 22:20. Reason: did I mention this is an excellent thread?

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    My wife and my 10 year old son are both competent with most operations of the boat. Iím totally confident Jody would have no problem returning to port and handling a variety of emergencies, etc. Jacob gets a lot of practice operating the boat to include starting and stopping the motor, forward and reverse maneuvering, underway navigation, etc; I let him do as much as possible. If one of us is on deck unaccompanied another is always watching, we take no chances.
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    Member Jimw's Avatar
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    If you are on my boat, you have a pfd on. We keep them on the 7 and 2 year old even off the boat. The rivers and tides run quick, one second they are there and the next second they are gone. The kids dont have the size or strength to swim or move with wet clothes on.
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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Do you require everyone to wear them in the boat while in the cabin? It seems like this would be pretty uncomfortable. My rule is that kids have to wear them outside the cabin all the time, and adults it is a personal choice (kind of like a helmet law). I try to wear mine all of the time outside, but I get lazy sometimes which I should get better about. Often I am the only one that can get the boat back, so it is pretty important that I stay functional.
    Good point, and I should correct myself. We all wear PFD's all the time except when sleeping. My wife makes darned sure the kids wear theirs and hounds me pretty good about mine...something about her not wanting to have to break in a new husband.

  15. #15

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    Good idea also is to have a rope with a loop tied off to a stern cleat, that you can use as a step to step back in the boat if you fall out.

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