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Thread: Ram and Bull - 2010

  1. #1

    Default Ram and Bull - 2010

    I had a great fall - 29 days off in a row to do what I love to do!

    My 2nd sheep hunt (solo) of this season was equally as difficult as my first successful sheep hunt (2004) which nearly killed me physically! On Sept 7, I found myself 15 air-miles from the truck with a dead ram! I was seven miles from camp when I shot the ram, it was raining, I was soaked, and it was 9 p.m. when I headed towards camp! I did have a change of dry clothes, lighters, and fire starter, but never used them. I had mixed emotions as to the outcome of that night: would I make it camp that night or have to bivwack out under some brush, would I get the meat to camp or have to drop it off and retrieve it the next day, would my headlamp batts die before I reach camp, would I eventually be so exhausted, cold, and wet that I would get the shakes and be in real trouble?

    Well, let me tell you, I found a real hero on that dark and rainy night, my 6 yr old black lab named Tikka! You know how a good horse or sled dog will lead you back to camp under poor conditions? Well, Tikka did just that and to say I was amazed, overwhelmed with pride, and truly thankful would be an understatement. She led me down the creek and when we would cross a sand bar there would be my boot track from earlier in the day, and there would be the old moose and caribou shed we passed by earlier! I fell twice due to the darkness, slippery rocks, and heavy load, which was a harsh reminder me of the predicament I was in. What blew me away was when she left the creek bottom to cut up the bank and cut across the tundra as we had earlier, heck, I couldn't have found that tiny trail leaving the creek in the dark or in the daylight! Simply amazing. I did have a gps, but she put us on the exact same trail which was easier walking. I say trail, but it was more like a "hunt and peck" kind of trail or route. Anyway, by 1:30 p.m I was getting pretty exhausted and worried my headlamp might die. I decided to drop the meat in a creek (in a HD trash bag) and hike the remaining 2.3 miles to camp with a lighter load. I arrived at camp at 2:52 a.m - that is a first for me! I spent the next 3 days hauling meat and camp back to the truck - I was physically wasted.

    The moose hunt was spent with a great friend and hunting partner in beautiful country. The weather was nothing but blue sky and sunshine for 8 days. This hunt was also very physically challenging.

    Since someone will ask, the sheep was north of FBKS and the moose was south!
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  2. #2

    Default pics

    more pics of the hunt
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  3. #3

    Default pics

    more sheep hunting pics
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  4. #4

    Default pics

    last sheep pics
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  5. #5

    Default moose pics

    a few moose pics
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  6. #6
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Nice ram, but even a better story. I have never done a solo sheep hunt, but have been on several hunts with two legged partners and have learned a lot about my limitations. It sounds like you have a great hunting partner in Tikka. Well done!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  7. #7

    Default moose pics

    more moose pics
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  8. #8

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    last of the pics
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  9. #9

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    Oh yeah, although the ram was 11 yrs old, he only had 32" horns WITH lamb tips. The bases were 13 7/8, he just didn't have the genetics to be a big boy.

  10. #10
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    congrats on the great success!! On a side note, how do you like the tent? Which model do you have?

  11. #11
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Excellent posts jpost, looks like some great time hunting,

    and for that Dog, what a Fine Animal, glad you posted those pics, made the story. I think I enjoyed the part about him leading you to camp that night as much as the rest of the entire story, must be cool hunting with your dog
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  12. #12

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    Thank you.

    The tent is a Titanium Goat, Vertex 8. I also have the TI Goat titanium stove (large). I love it. I love the floorless design, the fact that I can stand up and move around, sit on a stool to eat/relax, dry clothes and warm up. The tipi and stove are under 10 lbs and it held up to 14 days of April weather on Kodiak Island with no problem.

  13. #13
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    Default another great story and pics

    that dog is doing a helluva job. thanks for posting.

  14. #14
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Stud, Jpost, STUD! Fantastic hunts. Congratulations.

    Taylor

  15. #15
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    jpost,

    Looks like you had a great season. And sounds like you pushed it quite close to your physical limits on the ram hunt. And for that, I congratulate you X 100. I know you learned a lot about rams and ram hunting and have come to know yourself much better as a result of an endevor like you experienced. Getting back to camp at 2:52 AM is tough stuff! I have spent several "unsupported" nights on sheep mountains and a few cold nights on the tundra, but never as cold or wet as you described. Careful brother!

    And congrats on finding a super hunting partner. Next hunt, the dog deserves the first shot.

    Thanks for sharing your story and your pictures with us.

    dennis

  16. #16
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    Great story. Labs are wonderful dogs. That is a cool picture of Tikka sitting up on that mountain.

  17. #17
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    jpost, great pics and story! Have been there with a dog or dogs leading me back to camp, and really can't think of a better overall companion to have in the field than you have there with Tikka. They make a great early-warning system for camp invaders at night too, even if you let them sleep in the tent with you <grin>. Love my TiGoat and tigoat stove too btw.

    Curious on the decision making process on the ram. I know some are darn good at counting annuli through a scope and wonder if that is how you went about it.

    Way to get it done.



  18. #18
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    That one is worth a Way to go! Mental toughness to the max. No fancy gear or expensive gadget will replace what you brought into the field.

    Thanks for posting

  19. #19

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    Thanks fellas.

    This sheep hunt was particularly tough on both of us due to the # of miles traveled per day. The weather was so warm that I had to push us hard to get the meat home and chilled. The meat spent some time submerged in 2 different streams which worked well.

    Tikka joins me on most of my hunts. That shale in the Brooks took a tole on her pads and the # of miles traveled resulted in sore muscles for both of us. She didn't join me on our moose hunt because she was still recovering.

    Mark: I glassed both rams at 350 yards for about 15 minutes at 40X. One ram was NOT legal, but I was quite certain the bigger ram was over 8 yrs of age based on the annuli I counted. However, I wasn't certain enough to pull the trigger. They must have spotted my spotting scope or my head peering over the ridge at which time they walked up the hill away from me. Once they were out of sight, I continued up the Mt. and soon found them calmly feeding at 225 yards. It took me another 10 minutes or so of glassing at 40X to finally convince myself that he was clearly over 8 yrs old. He is 11 yrs old.

  20. #20
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    Great story and great pics!!! Thanks for sharing!!

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