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Thread: Drift Socks

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    Default Drift Socks

    I was looking at drift socks and the customer reviews on Cabelas - the review comments on them were extremely positive.

    Has anyone ever used these in the ocean (PWS, Seward or Homer) and, if so, how did they work with our significant fluctuations in tides?

    I can easily see the benefit in a lake with strong winds, but not sure about the ocean.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I used one this summer in PWS. It worked great. I bought the biggest one I could find from cabelas several years ago. I had never used it before. Bigger is better! I wish mine was...my drift sock that is.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    I used one this summer in PWS. It worked great. I bought the biggest one I could find from cabelas several years ago. I had never used it before. Bigger is better! I wish mine was...my drift sock that is.
    Drift socks don't work very well in the ocean because the current is often running different than the wind and they make you lay side ways in the trough. If I was ever dead in the water and it was too deep or rough to throw the anchor I'd trail buoys, buckets whatever to slow down my drift. Heck I'd deploy my gillnet and hang on it, it would be in closed waters so I'm certain I'd be rescued in a timely matter!
    spoiled one I'm pretty sure its not the size of the sock but the motion of the ocean. cough cough
    Last edited by fullbush; 09-25-2010 at 14:30. Reason: omG that was stupid

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    Drift socks don't work very well in the ocean because the current is often running different than the wind and they make you lay side ways in the trough. If I was ever dead in the water and it was too deep or rough to throw the anchor I'd trail buoys, buckets whatever to slow down my drift. Heck I'd deploy my gillnet and hang on it, it would be in closed waters so I'm certain I'd be rescued in a timely matter!
    spoiled one I'm pretty sure its not the size of the sock but the motion of the ocean. cough cough
    I ran mine off the stern between the twins and it worked great the few times I used it. As fullbush stated, buckets can work in a pinch. As far as the size of the sock or lack there of, it seems to me that you have some experience with that one... You do have a much bigger net than me, though.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    I use 2 drift socks all the time to slow my idle speed down when trolling for kings. They work great for that as my idle speed is around 4.75mph, with the socks it will be 1.5 to 2 and at times I wish I was a little slower.
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    I ran mine off the stern between the twins and it worked great the few times I used it. As fullbush stated, buckets can work in a pinch. As far as the size of the sock or lack there of, it seems to me that you have some experience with that one... You do have a much bigger net than me, though.
    we all know Maasts drift sock is biggest because he sewed all our AOD flags together and made a huge one!

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    Yeah, and all I wanted to know was about drift socks.....

    Thanks for the input on the socks - as for the other.... it's going to be a long winter on the thread.

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    This is just out of curiosity as I've never used my drfit sock in the traditional manor. I use it to help haul my shrimp pots and as blue thunder mentioned. However, I always thought if I was dead in the water in big seas it would help keep the bow into the wind and help stabilize the boat. Isn't this what Shackleton did when he sailed from Antarctica to Elephant Island? They called it a sea anchor and they used it to help stablize their small boat in the rough seas. Is this just a fact of the huge tides we have up here or am I missing something.

    I also use the largest cabelas drift sock and have been very happy with it. Its held up great and I use it alot.

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    patrickl you said you use the drift sock to help pull your pots, how do you do that?
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    They sell a rig that you run the rope through, then you hook up a buoy and drift sock for drag and pull the pots up with the boat. It works just like the buoy system for pulling an anchor. The only difference is you you need this special rig which has a pin to keep the line for going back down when you stop pulling. B&Js sells them and I highly recommend the metal rigs and not the plastic. Its basically a poor mans way to pull pots without killing yourself. I can't afford a pot puller just yet but this has worked okay so far.

    Hope that helps.

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    patrickL thanks for the info. I pull my pots with a buoy also and use the same anchor puller set up. Mine is plastic, so will check B&Js for the metal ones. Never thought about using a drift sock to help. The sock must put more drag on the pull to make the buoy more efficient. Do you have trouble with getting the sock tangled with the buoy and all? Thanks Dan
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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Yeah you definitely need to be careful and it can be a pain, but my buoy didn't have enough drag to pull up my three pot string. The drift sock really helps with that. Good luck and feel free to pm with questions. I do remember the metal rig wasn't cheap, maybe $35ish but I don't have to worry about it breaking.

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    You can use a five gallon bucket to create drag, too. Just clip the bucket to your ring.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    A good suggestion and cheaper. And multi-purpose. You can then use the bucket to dump your shrimp in. Who said you are the spoiled one. Creative for sure

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    A good suggestion and cheaper. And multi-purpose. You can then use the bucket to dump your shrimp in. Who said you are the spoiled one. Creative for sure
    So you only need one five gallon bucket to hold your shrimp?
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  16. #16

    Wink Sea anchor

    If you lose your motors and are in big water and big seas, you'll immediately turn beam to the waves and could capsize. Without a real sea achor make one quick; use your anchor line (leave anchor attached to boat) to make a sea anchor out of stuff on board. First the obvious and easiest stuff, the cooler, a tent or sleeping bag, blankets, seat cushions, tarps, and of course the bimini canvas. The longer the line out the better, creates more drag. Some stuff that floats some stuff that sinks will work, but more floating than sinking, thus do not add the anchor in the mix. Remember, it goes off the bow, longer the better! The action is like that of a boat at anchor in high winds, bow will face the uncoming waves, off shore sailboats dare not leave shore without one. When purchasing a sea anchor, they have certain sizes to match the size of the boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    So you only need one five gallon bucket to hold your shrimp?
    Well that's what I've been told

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    I have seen them used in hog lines on rivers when fishing. Tends to keep your boat straight when the wind comes up.......

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