Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Want to bring my father up for a bou hunt and need help!

  1. #1

    Default Want to bring my father up for a bou hunt and need help!

    My father was up this summer for a visit and he got all fired up over bou hunting. It all started when a buddy and I took a bou in the early season they opened up this year. Anyway, all he kept saying is he wanted to take a bou or two. He is 70 but is in very good health and physical shape. Although, and this is important, not good enough to pack a bou out any real distance let alone a couple miles. He can hoof it like a sheep in rut so I am not concerned about his ability to get around. Heck, he chases whitetails all over the mountains of PA for two weeks every November/December so he's good to go there.

    He and I have hunted whitetails since I was a pup in the lower 48. So, since we are both getting older and time has a tendency to slip away I would love to get him on some bou before I am sitting here wishing I would have done so when we had the time.

    My problem is I am not sure what the best hunt would be for him. I am not real keen on paying for a guide to get him a bou but considering his age and the fact he can't pack one out a guide may be our only option. While I am not a spring chicken I could pack one out for him but that would be an extremely painful experience. Right now it's the wheeler and the meat wagon for my packer. If I can't get to it on the wheeler it lives another day. (Unless of course I can get the wheeler close).

    So, I am wide open to suggestions. I realize we all have our special places and I am not asking for specific locations. What I would like is for some of you to give me some suggestions.

    Some things to consider when you post..

    a) I have been here three years so I can get around, know what and what not to do out there and I am comfortable in a tent, bag etc..
    b) I have hunted all my life but don't assume that I am "seasoned" when it comes to Alaskan hunting.
    b) I have wheelers, trailer to haul them etc..
    c) I have all the gear needed for a remote hunt if that's the answer.
    d) If you suggest and outfitter and have one that you had an excellent experience with please post it up


    I really do appreciate any suggestions you can give me. It's really important to me that he has a good, safe hunt and we get into the bou. I know he will be surprised and I know I will really enjoy spending time out there with him! So, please help me come up with a hunt that he and I can both remember!

    Oh, one last thing. Let's not take the money into consideration even though it will be a consideration in the end. I don't want to limit any suggestions you might have!

    Doug

  2. #2

    Default

    check out freshwater adventures.

  3. #3
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    You could make the scenic road trip up to Deadhorse, take the tour of the Prudhoe Bay oil fields, backtrack to the Happy Valley airstrip, and do a fly-out drop hunt with http://www.seventynorth.com/ to hunt the Central Arctic Caribou Herd. The drive up and back is an adventure in itself that your dad might enjoy.

  4. #4
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    A similar suggestion as birdstrike. While my dad's only 60 I've taken him on two hunts with Deltana out of Happy Valley. I just used them as a fly in service as we're like you and don't really want to go with a guide. They've treated us so well we keep thinking of going back again. One reason we wouldn't is we want to do a sheep or moose and they only offer them in guided hunts. Given your situation I think they would be ideal. They would fly you in, drop you off within a reasonable distance of great hunting and all you have to do is pack the caribou back to the strip for them to pick it up. I think the most I've had to pack it was about 1.5 miles and both years we've shot nice animals within 400 yards of camp. I can't say enough about them and feel free to pm me with questions.

  5. #5
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    dvarmit,
    Listen and believe what Birdstrike wrote above. Mike McCrary, Severtynorth, will be your least expensive and most successful caribou hunt of all the alternatives. As Birdstrike said, the road trip up north alone is a great stunning adventure. The flight into and out of the Brooks Range is fantastic. The caribou and grizz bears are the cherry on top of this desert!

    aksquirrel.....have you flown with Freshwater Adventures in the last six years? Have you hunted the Mulchatna caribou herd in the last eight years? The mulchatna caribou herd imploded eight and ten years ago. It is less than a shadow of its former self. Where I used to see 10,000 caribou per year/Sept in unit 17, I now see between zero and five. That is 0 to 5 individual animals. Check the current hunting regulation for the resident and nonresident bag limit for caribou in GMU 17.
    dennis

  6. #6

    Default

    I stand corrected, I suppose a different caribou hunt would be a good idea for non-residents. Sorry your not seeing many animals lately. Yes I have hunted that herd in the past 8 years. I helped the herd implode. I went back and shot a bear though, so its kinda like a wash.

  7. #7
    Member Bucksandnoles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Inverness, FL
    Posts
    90

    Default

    X3 for Mike McCrary @ seventynorth!

  8. #8

    Default

    Alrighty then, I'll check it out. I do have a question though. We hunted more or less resident bou this year since the early season was way before the yearly stomp and go.

    What is the best way to assure that the herd will be in the area?
    Do they have specific area's that they drop people or do I have to research and pick out an area to drop us?
    What unit were you in 26??? A,B,C?

    I would much prefer it if they knew the when and where and all we had to do was get dropped off, setup camp and pack some bou meat to the air strip. Not that I am not willing to do the leg work to find animals but but if they know the area then...

    I just checked Prudhoe is a 28 hour drive from Wasilla ??? Holy Cow!

  9. #9
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dvarmit View Post
    Alrighty then, I'll check it out. I do have a question though. We hunted more or less resident bou this year since the early season was way before the yearly stomp and go.

    What is the best way to assure that the herd will be in the area?
    Do they have specific area's that they drop people or do I have to research and pick out an area to drop us?
    What unit were you in 26??? A,B,C?

    I would much prefer it if they knew the when and where and all we had to do was get dropped off, setup camp and pack some bou meat to the air strip. Not that I am not willing to do the leg work to find animals but but if they know the area then...

    I just checked Prudhoe is a 28 hour drive from Wasilla ??? Holy Cow!
    I think that estimate of 28 hours is way off. I could be wrong here but I thought it was 16-18 hours to Happy Valley from Anchorage. Say 6 to fairbanks and then another 10ish to Happy Valley. As all have said, the drive is spectacular. My dad and I enjoyed the drive as much as we enjoyed the hunting. Good luck whatever you do.

  10. #10
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    PatrickL is correct.....in that happy Valley is about 16 driving hours north of Wasilla/Anchorage, depending on your driving habits. I've done it straight through, and I've done it by camping up north of the Yukon River. So if you camp on the way up it will be that 28 hours. yep, this north country caribou trip begins and ends with a great guys-type-road-trip.
    These pilots know the country and where the caribou have been. They will be able to assist you with the decision of where to be dropped off. They can not tell you where to go. But they can discuss drop-off landing locations and recent caribou movements. In recent years, the caribou movements have been fairly consistent, which really is a dangerous thing for me to write/say. A drop off way up the Ivishak River is always productive. But there are a hundred, possible a thousand (?) other similar drop off places. Some prefer early August. I'm a late August guy. And your choice is?? Keep in mind that an 'air-support-service" wants your repeat and perpetuated business, they want you to be successsful.

    dennis

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dvarmit View Post
    What is the best way to assure that the herd will be in the area?
    Never a guarantee, but..

    Until the weather gets cool there is no real "herd" - just a lot of animals milling around up high trying to stay away from the bugs. Pilots out of Happy Valley may know where there have recently been a bunch of them but if you're not too picky about seeing a legendary migration they can put you in somewhere near ice where you're at least very likely to see a shootable bull or ten.

    I had two novice teenagers along last year and am no expert myself, so shelled out the $ for a guided trip with Deltana. It was a superb experience.

    If time matters more to you than money Ralph runs a truck from the Deadhorse airport for $300/person RT (no extra charge for guided trips) but those hours driving up from Fairbanks would not be wasted. I think Mike has ways of getting you down from Deadhorse, too. He's always worth consulting.

  12. #12

    Default

    Your comments about the herd match what we saw in the early hunt this year. Most were up high and they all appeared to be a more resident group of animals. I think a drive will work. I was a little shocked with the 28 hours since I have have friends make it up and back in 3 days. They didn't stop much and switched drivers.

    As far as were to go and when to go I was thinking late August. I do not like hunting in warm weather so late August seemed like it might be a winner.

    Thanks for all the information and certainly, if anyone else has input, I would like to hear it!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •