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Thread: Loopy Question, I admit

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Loopy Question, I admit

    OK, I admit this is a short cut to thinking much but, maybe it'll be good for entertainment,

    Can I tumble loaded rounds......???

    Short story, I have one box of 220 gr roundnose .300 Weatherby Magnum that may be as many as 20 some yrs old. Thought I'd give them to a friend who has a MkV, I obviously haven't for about 20 some yrs....lost mine in a fire, box of ammo been hanging around, pretty dry. They don't have any green on 'em, bit tarnished...dirty, I'd want them cleaner if it was my rifle.

    I pulled one and the powder looks crisp and dry, bullet was shiny beneath the seating depth. Primers appear to have been sealed. Don't have the die to reseat them if I pulled them and tumbled them.

    Have a hard time tossin' 'em, So, a little vibrating or NOT? Seems fairly low risk, maybe heat them up a bit ..... or am I being pretty wierd over $65 or so ????

    Go ahead, lace me up if I need it here, no gentleness needed,
    well maybe a little...
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    OK, I admit this is a short cut to thinking much but, maybe it'll be good for entertainment,

    Can I tumble loaded rounds......???

    Short story, I have one box of 220 gr roundnose .300 Weatherby Magnum that may be as many as 20 some yrs old. Thought I'd give them to a friend who has a MkV, I obviously haven't for about 20 some yrs....lost mine in a fire, box of ammo been hanging around, pretty dry. They don't have any green on 'em, bit tarnished...dirty, I'd want them cleaner if it was my rifle.

    I pulled one and the powder looks crisp and dry, bullet was shiny beneath the seating depth. Primers appear to have been sealed. Don't have the die to reseat them if I pulled them and tumbled them.

    Have a hard time tossin' 'em, So, a little vibrating or NOT? Seems fairly low risk, maybe heat them up a bit ..... or am I being pretty wierd over $65 or so ????

    Go ahead, lace me up if I need it here, no gentleness needed,
    well maybe a little...
    Well then we're both needing a working over cuz I have already done that only they were old store bought 270s. I shinyed them up and shot or shot at coyotes with them. I probably wouldn't have used them on a serious endeavor but the coyotes were none the wiser!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i think i would take before and after COL's they take a harder beating in my atv box on the way out some where... i guess don't do to many at a time??????????
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    I've done it in my earlier years with no ill effects, but that doesn't guarantee safety. I've also loaded 129gr 6.5x55 loads that chronographed at 2940fps (!!!!) from a sporterized M-38 carbine and I've still got all my fingers and both original eyeballs. Again; just because I got away with it doesn't mean it's necessarily safe.

    If you like the risk vs. reward, I'd recommend you not overload the tumbler (20 rounds in a 100rnd capacity tumbler is about right) and ensure it's as full of media as possible. If you have a garage or shed to do it in, even better.

    IMO it's not an overly dangerous proposition, but there is a risk, and there are some folks out there very adverse to taking any unnecessary risk regardless the potential reward.
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    I would do a bit more checking before I would commit to it. I've read on other forums that the coated powders lose their coating from to much handling. That makes them ignite much easier and changes their burn rate and pressure levels. I imagine that the vibration would cause the kernels to rub together and change the characteristics of the powder if yours is the coated variety.

    If your concerned about discoloration you can clean them up with a wad of Never Dull with very little effort.

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    I just use Never Dull, a brass polish I get in marine supply stores. It's basically cotton batting soaked in some kind of brass polish and sold in little blue, red and white cans for not much money. A few quick strokes on the ammo and all but corrosion is gone.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses and the ideas, the Never Dull sounds easy, I was thinking brass wool or something like that to polish them up by hand but as I remember also Brasso or other metal polish will work fine and a bit easier.

    Didn't factor in the possibility of the kernels rubbing off the powder coating. Could be a real factor, these are 80 gr loads so I don't really have much room to change powder charge characteristics wisely.

    Any ideas on what powder would be used in a Factory Loaded Weatherby round from the eighties? Just curious, coated or not? Looks a lot like RL-22 from the stuff I have (4350,4831,RL19,22) cylindrical and fairly shortcut, a bit shinier than most
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Any ideas on what powder would be used in a Factory Loaded Weatherby round from the eighties? Just curious, coated or not? Looks a lot like RL-22 from the stuff I have (4350,4831,RL19,22) cylindrical and fairly shortcut, a bit shinier than most
    Hard to say with hand loads using extruded powder. There are quite a few that use a deterrent coating on the slow burning high energy extruded magnum powders.

    I think the factory loads use more double base powders with the coating to achieve their propitiatory blends.

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    Many competition shooters tumble loaded rounds. I've done it. Like said before though, I wouldn't stuff the tumbler full and do it. I had this same question a few years ago and I called Brian Enos to ask a couple questions. He hasn't had a problem with it and it hasn't affected his accuracy as far as shaking off the graphite.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Any ideas on what powder would be used in a Factory Loaded Weatherby round from the eighties? Just curious, coated or not? Looks a lot like RL-22 from the stuff I have (4350,4831,RL19,22) cylindrical and fairly shortcut, a bit shinier than most
    IIRC, wasn't Weatherby ammo in that era loaded by Norma?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Short story, I have one box of 220 gr roundnose .300 Weatherby Magnum that may be as many as 20 some yrs old. They don't have any green on 'em, bit tarnished...dirty, I'd want them cleaner if it was my rifle.
    It sounds like they're OK to shoot, AS IS.

    If there's no actual grit, that would damage a rifle chamber, I can see no reason not to.

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    If we put some perspective on it.
    You have about $65 worth of old ammo that you are planning to give to a friend for FREE, GRATIS, NADA. With the understanding that you explain to him the age etc of said ammo and that he/she accepts those risks. Worst case scenarios here are; fail to feed/hard extraction due to built up of corrosion and/or misfire/sqib. All non-catastrophic and easily fixed.
    However, you are prepared to put said $65 of ammo through your (approx $100) tumbler to make em shiny. Worst case scenario (although unlikely) is bullet and primer meet with enough pressure to ignite, catastophic damage to your tumbler and possibly injury to yourself.

    For all the time effort and possible (although low) risk, I would just give your buddy the rounds and be done!

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    I guess I had more concern that the rounds would not fire well in the friends rifle than the possibility they would somehow "Cook-off" in the Tumbler.
    Thinking that after getting heated up by the vibrating or would have something like seating depth shift some, maybe the primers get screwed up somehowand would introduce an unsafe round to the equation, unsafe in an overpressure way.

    All in all, yep doesn't make much sense to worry about polish beyond basic cleaning them up by hand some, Thanks for the advice
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Thinking that after getting heated up by the vibrating or would have something like seating depth shift some, maybe the primers get screwed up somehowand would introduce an unsafe round to the equation, unsafe in an overpressure way.

    All in all, yep doesn't make much sense to worry about polish beyond basic cleaning them up by hand some, Thanks for the advice
    I can't imagine any concerns there, or guys couldn't haul them around on ATVs, much less in their pockets. Try the NevrDull. I'm pretty sure they have it at Sutlifs in the marine department over against the wall with all the other cleaners, and it's cheap. You'll find all sorts of uses for it once you have a can. I've got a can that has to be 20 years old and still going strong.

  15. #15

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    They are not going to go off in the tumbler! Period!

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    When I loaded lots and lots of .223 ammo for my AR, I used to tumble the loaded rounds to get the case lube off of them. Worked great!

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    A lot of people clean loaded rounds in tumblers without problems. One fellow even did a velocity before and after check on a batch of loaded rounds without any change. I would probably just polish them with fine steel wool. Watch using any chemical cleaner for ammonia content as it can make the brass brittle and subject to case cracking when fired. Scotch Brite would work well also.

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