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Thread: Thought I would introduce myself

  1. #1
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    Default Thought I would introduce myself

    I am from Wyoming and in my early 20's. I came to Valdez this last May to spend some time with some friends that moved there 3 years ago, and I feel in love with the area. Now I'm trying to figure out how to get up there full time myself. I have been stalking your forums for a while now and figured I would introduce myself.

    I do have a question for you guys, though. When I move up there, I'm gonna get a really good rod and reel. Has anybody used the G Loomis Halibut Rod? What did you think of it? Is it worth paying that much? The friends that we have up there have a boat and I will be fishing A LOT, and will be trying to find the giant halibut so I want to get geared up correctly.

  2. #2

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    Have you thought of building your own rods? Hardest part about building rods in applying finish on guide wraps... g loomis sells top of the line rod blanks, but you pay for the name..
    There are blanks out there that don't cost as much... Check out Riley rods. Go to rodbuilding.org on the left their is a link. Also check NERBs they are good blank. With good guides on rod, cost will be around 200.00 to 250.00.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by aksportfisher View Post
    Have you thought of building your own rods? Hardest part about building rods in applying finish on guide wraps... g loomis sells top of the line rod blanks, but you pay for the name..
    There are blanks out there that don't cost as much... Check out Riley rods. Go to rodbuilding.org on the left their is a link. Also check NERBs they are good blank. With good guides on rod, cost will be around 200.00 to 250.00.
    Never really thought about that before. I worked in a bait shop for a summer and learned the price of G Loomis, but also the quality there. Nobody I have ever talked to has built their own rods, though. My fear is the big fish, because while I was in Alaska we hooked into a 180 and that thing was a heck of a fight. I can't imagine one double that size. I would be afraid of a home built pole on a 250+, which is really what I would want to be chasing. Also, I found out that quality rods for fighting those big fish really help the back. Can you get that same result with a home built one?

  4. #4

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    I've never used a G Loomis halibut rod, and can only guess that it's not inexpensive. That being said, there are lots of less expensive rods that are very good and will last a long time. If it were me, and I wanted to get some good first-time gear, then I'd put my money into getting a good reel. You can always get the expensive rod later. You might ask your friends up here what they use. But I've been known to spend lots of money on good gear when I could have spent less for less good gear

  5. #5

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    Welcome to the forum. I like to fish with quality gear, as most people do. For years I outfitted my boat with heavier halibut rods and reels. I got an Avet LX 6/3 reel and hooked it to a Penn Torque rod. It's such a nice combination, extremely light and plenty of backbone. I'm in the process of re-outfitting my boat with all lighter gear. Avet SX 2 speeds and Trevala F series rods. These will allow fishing for other species as well (rockfish, lings). I've never fished with a G-Loomis halibut rod, but own other Loomis rods. Yes, they are high quality, but I'm going to lighter gear all around. I've caught plenty of big 'butts, and the lighter jig rods hold up well. By and large, you won't get that many big ones. I enjoy the 60-100# (and, of course, smaller) fish on a little lighter gear now. I don't like to keep the really big ones. Just my way of thinking.

  6. #6

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    I think you can build a better rod.... you can space out reel seat for the length of your arms. Rod will light and easy to fish with... And you can pick which thread color, reel seat color you want. There are many options....

  7. #7

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    I just looked up g loomis halibut rod.. I used the same aftco light butt guides and roller tips on my salmon trolling poles... Of course their are alot of guide choices.

  8. #8
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    Thanks guys. I know it is expensive, but I would rather buy the right rod first. The friends I have are using some pretty cheap rods, and they want to upgrade as well. Is there a good explanation somewhere on how to build your rods? I checked out that sight, but it seemed like a good place to go if you already know what you are doing, unless I overlooked something. Reels were going to be my next question, as well, so keep them ideas coming. As far as money goes, I am not made of money, but with the job I have and the hours I have been promised, I should have about 18 grand in the bank when I head up to AK. I want to put some into good gear and then the rest will probably go towards a boat with my buddy. He is using his uncles boat right now and wants his own. I figure if I pitch in we can get something a little nicer/bigger.

    As far as the catching big halibut/keeping them goes, near as I can tell the fight doesn't kill a halibut like it does rockfish. If so, then I am all about the catch and release on them, but it is still cooler to pull up a 200 pounder then a 40. I only keep the fish I want to eat, and so I figure I will keep a couple 40 or so pounders just because of the mercury issues with eating lots of big fish.

    Another question that you guys have brought to light for me. We caught a bunch of rockfish off the bottom but I was told they can be anywhere in the water. If going for rockfish, can I use some of my walleye/northern pike rods and fish suspended fish and get the lighter action going on on them? Lingcod too? They are medium heavy rods with good spinning reels. I figure washing the salt water off after each trip out, they would hold up but then again you guys are the experts.

  9. #9

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    This season I have been using Tica Alaskan Big Game rods. They are only 5 ft. long (they also make this rod in 4'6" and 5'6", but I like the 5') so very easy to handle and I think they're one of the best rods you can buy for the money. I spent $99 each on them at Ulmer's. They are light, have great guides, nice long grips on them and super action. All of my clients seem to love them for all the reasons I stated. I know I do.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  10. #10
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    You should check out the Wright & Magill rods that B&Js sell, they're about the best bang for your buck in heavy duty rods. I have 6 onboard and just love them.

    A few things you might want to think about when buying a rod:

    - Construction of the rod; fiberglass/graphite/both?
    - Construction of the guides; ceramic/rollers/steel (bad)?
    - Construction of the reel seats; aluminum/stainless/graphite
    - How is the handle covered; neoprene/cork/etc

    Once you determine that the rod is of good quality construction then you get into what you want it to do.
    This is completely subjective and is entirely YOUR choice for whats comfortable for YOU. You're going to hear a million differing opinions - some of them rather vociferous.

    - How stiff is the backbone (roughly the first 2/3rds to 3/4ths of the rod) also known as the power of the rod.
    - How responsive is the tip (last 1/3rd to 1/4ths of the rod) or how much do you want the tip to bounce when you get a hit balanced with how much stiffness do you want when jigging or setting a hook, again - its subjective.
    - How long do you want your rod, the longer the rod the longer the jigging stroke, however the longer the rod the more mechanical leverage the fish has. Also balanced with keeping pressure on the fish while reeling it in (longer, more limber rods do a bit better at this)
    - Length of the rod butt (how long is it from the end to the reel seat), is there room for rod holders? How far away is the reel from your body when holding it?

    Personally, I like short rod butts with short (4.5'-5') stiff fiberglass rods with ceramic guides for bottom fishing while soaking bait, and longer (6'-7.5') stiff fiberglass rods for jigging. All I have on board is the bottom bait rods, I dont do much jigging and when I do the shorter rods do well enough even though its not ideal. For casting I like longer (8'-9') noodle rods made out of graphite. I dont like rollers on rods because the line tends to get in between the roller and the guide seat and can be a PITA.

    Your best bet is to go to a shop with a good selection of rods and talk to a salesmen who knows what they're talking about, have them tug first sharply and then slowly & strongly downwards at the last eyelet of the rods as you're holding them, figure out how far away you want the reel from your body. Before you start spending serious money on rods (which you'll have for many many years) get some lesser expensive rods with the characteristics you think you'll want and use them for a season.

    Good luck!
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
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