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Thread: Stuck Rod Pieces

  1. #1
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    Default Stuck Rod Pieces

    My friend has a 4 piece Sage rod, the top two sections are stuck together. he's tried the "Pull really hard" method with not luck. Even heated the ferrules a little, again no luck. He took it into the fly shop here in Juneau and they were unsuccessful, but they just re-tried the pull really hard method. Any suggestions on how he can pop those suckers apart?
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Can't get youtube on this computer unfortunately. I'll have to look later.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Member egreife's Avatar
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    Try a squirt of WD-40 on the ferrules.

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    he's got it in the freezer right now, hoping some freeze-thaw effect will loosen things up. I wish I had a big sonic bath. We used to get stuck glass stoppers out of flasks in about 30 seconds with one of those.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    When I get stuck ferrules, I grip the 2 sides on either side of my butt to seperate them. you need to grip the pieces tighter than your "spread". You use the forearms as levers (against the butt) and the steady pressure usually will pop them apart.
    Obviously, your hands should also be applying opposite rotation force to the 2 pieces, while pulling them apart.
    Its kind of hard to explain & my camera doesn't shoot panaramic, so I can't post a pic. Its the STEADY pressure that wins the battle, not a sudden jerk - no matter how big the jerk.
    Rather than using WD-40, I'd try to find some pure silicon spray, if going that route. The silicone shouldn't hurt or stain anything, but the WD-40 might.
    Gary

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Man, that sucks. Maybe try some rubber in each hand and use a twist. Never had one stick like that. Might be a good time to tell your buddy about waxing ferrules. I do this on my rods and it takes very little pressure to put them together. The wax prevents scratches on the ferrules and allows them to stay put together with little effort. Good luck.


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    I grip the 2 sides on either side of my butt to seperate them.Gary
    AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH HAHAHAHA!

    Sorry I had to

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    Yeah I had the same thought. It's pretty dang funny when you read it that way.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Two small pairs of channel-locks and a couple soft rags. Biggest problem is typically getting a grip. Wrap the rags (2-3 layers) around the rod right next to the joint then use the pliers to grip the rod with the rags under the jaws. Don't apply a lot of pressure, but a little won't hurt anything. If you can get it to twist it should come apart.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I wonder if you could use those rubber grips that are used to remove carbon arrows from bow targets???? They work great for gripping the arrow shaft.

    http://www.lancasterarchery.com/prod...oducts_id=1179

    Steve

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Channel-lock marks (or any crush marks, for that matter) have a way of voiding warranties.

    Pour 180 water on the female ferrule and icewater on the male ferrule, then grip it close and use a rocking/twisting motion without much pulling. Should be a slight creak or pop as the vacuum pressure gives, then you are home free.

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    Thanks for all the ideas so far, keep'em coming. I've been passing them along. When/If he gets them unstuck I'll let you know which method worked.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    use a rocking/twisting motion without much pulling.
    Once when trying to get some parts apart my high school shop teacher told me 'The slightest wiggle is more powerful than the hardest pull'... It may be just common sense, but it has stuck with me for years.

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    I gotta agree with that. That was always the way to handle the glass stoppers on flasks in the lab. A slight wiggle and a turn would get the stopper out much easier than trying to pull it straight out.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  16. #16

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    Easy fix. Drill a hole through a piece of 1x (oak or maple are best) the same size or slightly larger than the male side of the joint. Split the board through the hole. Could just as well clamp 2 pieces together and drill down between them, rather than split.

    Whichever method you choose, lay the male section on one half, put the other piece of wood in place and clamp it at each end.

    Now rap on the piece of wood with a rubber mallet or even a hammer toward the female side of the joint. Pop, and it's off. There used to be a company that turned out a similar thing with about a dozen holes pre-drilled for using the same technique.

    Next, let me introduce you to this neat product called ferrule wax....

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    I told him about the ferrule wax. Trust me, he won't not use it anymore.

    I would be worried about damaging the lip of the female side with this method, but it sounds like you've used it before.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBoater View Post
    I would be worried about damaging the lip of the female side with this method, but it sounds like you've used it before.
    Yeah, I've been using it something over 40 years, ever since Fenwick tipped the apple cart with this style of integral ferrule. Any time you start heating fiber rods or clamping them, lots more damage can occur. Rapping the end (and it takes almost no rap at all), lets you hit the end of the fibers, rather than compressing from the side. Bad business.

    Can't remember the name of the commercial product, but it looked like a wooden version of the clamp used for flaring copper tubing, right down to the hinge on one end and wingnut lock on the other. Been making my own when I've needed them ever since someone "borrowed" my orginal.

  19. #19
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    Channel-lock marks (or any crush marks, for that matter) have a way of voiding warranties.

    That is why you use a rag to protect the surface and light pressure. It has worked with no damage on at least 5 of my own rods...
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  20. #20

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    You can cut a couple of pieces of the plastic mesh that the ladies like to put in the bottom of kitchen drawers, not sure what it's called but it's almost a neoprene mesh. Comes in different colors. Good to grip with.

    Great Youtube video... not sure what a "furrel" is though!

    L

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