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Thread: Cannelures

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Cannelures

    I recently picked up a box of 162 gr SSTs for my .280. Question is, I have been using Accubonds, and have been loading longer than standard, so with the cannelured SSTs, should I seat them at the cannelure and crimp, or stick to my custom COAL and leave the cannelure out of the case neck? Does it matter?
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  2. #2

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    Shouldn't matter at all in a bolt. The cannelure helps restrict expansion a bit when applied right, but unless you're using a gun that really needs crimped bullets, you can pretty much ignore it. The biggest problems I've had with cannelures is with them being in the wrong place when I really need to crimp. My old C&H cannelure tool allows me to roll my own wherever I want them on a bullet, so that particular "problem" was an easy fix.

  3. #3
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i have a roomy magazine box in my .35 whelen, and normally seat my bullets .10 off the lands. the cannelure is beyond the case mouth and no crimp is needed to hold that bullet. my .35 loads are near 2800fps but have never had a bullet "jump the case mouth". don't overwork your necks and trim & champfer only as needed.
    happy trails.
    jh

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    ...you can pretty much ignore it...

    I've never worried about cannelures when reloading. If they happened to line-up with my desired COAL; great, if not; no big deal. The most accurate load I've ever put together for a big game rifle used Hornady 225gr Spire Points and the cannelure was nowhere near the case mouth.

    Be aware the ogive of the Accubond is different than the SST, so you may have to tweak your COAL to get the same seating distance off the lands.
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    You can crimp in the canalure if you are getting any bullet jump with heavy mag rounds. I have never had that problem. some people crimp for consistant preasures.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I agree with all previous posters. If the groove is close to my case trim length and I have at least a caliber of neck I will trim the case to the cannelure and make it work. If not, I don't worry about it.

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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Thanks guys.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  8. #8
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel Nut View Post
    Be aware the ogive of the Accubond is different than the SST, so you may have to tweak your COAL to get the same seating distance off the lands.

    Cannelures are normally necessary for roll crimps, but otherwise are superfluous for bullets. Seat them where your rifle likes 'em and "Call it good!"
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  9. #9

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    Here's a glimpse back into the "good old days" when Nosler was the only premium and a fair number of folks made their own jacketed bullets, principally with Corbin equipment. Both Corbin and C&H made tools to roll your own cannelures onto bullets. Here is the listing for the Corbin tool, but unfortunately no pics.

    Basically there is a bed for the bullet to rotate in, and a knurled wheel you press down against the bullet and rotate it.

    Here's the interesting part, and sorry, I can't find the old references: But at one time cannelures were applied to cup-and-core bullets to somewhat limit expansion and weight loss. Original cannelure tools had sharp edges, which resulted in a jacket rupture under expansion at the leading edge of the cannelure. But by rounding the edges on the knurled wheel, you produced a radiused edge on the cannelure that didn't tend to rupture, and in fact helped control expansion while also helping retain the core. It wasn't effective at magnum velocities, but back then in the dark ages it was a comparatively cheap way to improve performance on most bullets. I had the best results with Speer and Norma, but it helped with Sierra, too. I rolled an extra cannelure on both Remington and Hornady bullets, and that seemed to help, too.

    That's all ancient history, but if you ever run across one of these cannelure tools at a bargain price, you can sure have fun testing your own "semi-premium" bullets. At typical 06 velocities and less, there really is an improvement, even if it's not a Nosler or other premium.

    Just a little extra clutter for the back of your mind.

  10. #10
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    The back of my mind needs a garage sale mate!
    Those SSTs are strange bullets. Seated at .030 off the lands, I am essentialy at 3.330". The cannelure is at less than standard COAL. Yet, the SST is a 162 gr vs the ABonds 160, which seats much further out. Strangely, the SST looks much sleaker up front than the ABond, yet this is clearly not the case.
    All sorts of fun.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  11. #11
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    The back of my mind needs a garage sale mate!
    Those SSTs are strange bullets. Seated at .030 off the lands, I am essentialy at 3.330". The cannelure is at less than standard COAL. Yet, the SST is a 162 gr vs the ABonds 160, which seats much further out. Strangely, the SST looks much sleaker up front than the ABond, yet this is clearly not the case.
    All sorts of fun.
    The joys of loading your own...

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Here's a glimpse back into the "good old days" when Nosler was the only premium and a fair number of folks made their own jacketed bullets, principally with Corbin equipment. Both Corbin and C&H made tools to roll your own cannelures onto bullets. Here is the listing for the Corbin tool, but unfortunately no pics.

    Basically there is a bed for the bullet to rotate in, and a knurled wheel you press down against the bullet and rotate it.

    Here's the interesting part, and sorry, I can't find the old references: But at one time cannelures were applied to cup-and-core bullets to somewhat limit expansion and weight loss. Original cannelure tools had sharp edges, which resulted in a jacket rupture under expansion at the leading edge of the cannelure. But by rounding the edges on the knurled wheel, you produced a radiused edge on the cannelure that didn't tend to rupture, and in fact helped control expansion while also helping retain the core. It wasn't effective at magnum velocities, but back then in the dark ages it was a comparatively cheap way to improve performance on most bullets. I had the best results with Speer and Norma, but it helped with Sierra, too. I rolled an extra cannelure on both Remington and Hornady bullets, and that seemed to help, too.

    That's all ancient history, but if you ever run across one of these cannelure tools at a bargain price, you can sure have fun testing your own "semi-premium" bullets. At typical 06 velocities and less, there really is an improvement, even if it's not a Nosler or other premium.

    Just a little extra clutter for the back of your mind.
    Since Barns did this with the tripple shock for a reduction in friction and its benifits, I was looking for other companies to follow up with two or three canlures on long bullets of older designs. even just for sales or for higher velocity guns.

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