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Thread: Best Method for Strapping Moose to Frame

  1. #1

    Default Best Method for Strapping Moose to Frame

    What's the best method that you've found for strapping moose quarters to a pack frame? I put 4 NRS Cam-lock style loop straps on the Barney's Frame and think that this will give me a fairly quick and solid strapping system to keep the meat strapped solidly to the frame. Just curious what other's have had luck with. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Parachute cord and use a "truckers hitch" type of knot. You can tighten it enough that it wont slide around. Assuming you have a meat shelf of course...

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    Member germe1967's Avatar
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    Are bungee cords a recipe for disaster when trying to tie meat to a frame?

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Yes, IMO. You can never get them tight enough to keep the load from shifting around while your walking. If you do get them tight enough, you'll need a knife to untie the knots...thats the beauty of a trucker's hitch, it will never be so tight that you can't untie it...

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by germe1967 View Post
    Are bungee cords a recipe for disaster when trying to tie meat to a frame?
    I know lots that love them. But I've found that the weight can still shift and that's the WORST thing to happen when carrying it out. Not to mention...one breaks, or if you get tired and it slips out of a wet, dirty hand....has potential for a bad injury as a result.
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    Buy a couple of those 1 inch wide tie down straps with the ratcheting tightener. Ten times better than parachute cord.
    Tennessee

  7. #7

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    I think bungees would be problematic. They're especially dangerous if they unstrap and get you in the eye or face.

    Dkwarthog,
    How much para cord do you typically use to hold a quarter to a frame? Is it pretty quick to lace it on?

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    I use ganion line (you know...line for commerical halibut set ups). No stretch, very tough, and very durable. Just lash it back and forth over the meat and to the frame. It can be "time consuming", but it is worth it as shifting meat on a 2 mile pack out....is a BAD, BAD thing!
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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    I think bungees would be problematic. They're especially dangerous if they unstrap and get you in the eye or face.

    Dkwarthog,
    How much para cord do you typically use to hold a quarter to a frame? Is it pretty quick to lace it on?
    It doesnt take much if you have a meat shelf. Enough to make maybe three or four laces across....maybe about 8 feet or so...

    I agree that ratchet straps would work good, my fingers hate releasing the ratchet mechanism when cold and the webbing seems to get twisted all the time on the roller...yea, Im a wussie...IMO using cord is alot more versatle. The straps always seem like 50x too long..

  10. #10

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    Thanks for the information. I put those loop straps on mine because I can operate them if my hands are cold and they're always in place on the frame. No fumbling around in the dark looking for straps, no knots to tie. I was tempted to cut the long ends, but I'll wait to do that. The cam locks only tighten down as hard as I can pull on the things, which isn't as hard as a ratchet strap, but they're quick and should secure the load (I hope). I'll see how it works out and have para-cord for backup. I've been practicing the truckers hitch, so I'm ready to use it if needed.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post
    I use ganion line (you know...line for commerical halibut set ups). No stretch, very tough, and very durable. Just lash it back and forth over the meat and to the frame. It can be "time consuming", but it is worth it as shifting meat on a 2 mile pack out....is a BAD, BAD thing!
    How would you know about a "pack" out??

  12. #12

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    I think the NRS straps would work VERY well and easy to put on and take off.

  13. #13
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    I would be interested in seeing pictures if anybody has any that they might be willing to post.
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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by northway View Post
    How would you know about a "pack" out??
    Not all of my hunts take place in Nome. I do hole the record for "Moose taken the greatest distance from camp" at an astounding 3.6 miles (as a crow flies) back to camp. It is a feat...that is to be NEVER repeated!!
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

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  15. #15

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    3.6 Miles!!! I'd probably end up having to eat half of the moose on that journey. I hope it wasn't 3.6 miles of tussocks.

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    3.6 Miles!!! I'd probably end up having to eat half of the moose on that journey. I hope it wasn't 3.6 miles of tussocks.
    Maaaaann....I try to never bring this up. And glad my family members are too busy this morning to see this post....

    It was my first moose (59"), put a LONG stalk on it. Lets just say it was going a different direction than camp was. I got it...it fell in a "pond"...and had to have someone bring a come-along up to said "pond". No one (except me...and only briefly) was happy with the situation. It was a learning lesson...and a very bad one.

    Oh yeah, yes...all tussocks...well, all but the last .15 miles of river bed (which was almost as bad as those rocks just HURT on yoru feet after hauling chunks out).

    Like I said...a feat to NEVER be repeated!!!! But...the Ganion lined worked good in securing the loads.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    the best way to lash a moose is on EVERYONE ELSES pack frames, good and tight,,, then take up the lead so you can't see the looks of pain on their faces...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    after bagging in cloth, para cord with a 4" heavy bungee works for me. it keeps strong tension on the cord, but allows easy removal.this is the system that really works! it's rated to 120# and is adjustable
    to your height, build etc. works great!this is a wilderness pack specialties outfit from schnees. very reasonable $140. and strong.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Light weight strap.


  20. #20

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    A pack frame with hooks on the sides; "twisted" cordage (no sheath); a "rubber band" cut from an innertube tied to the end of the corde.
    After lacing the load to the frame the rubbed band can be looped over a hook eliminating the need for a knot.
    Bands from innertubes also great for rolled up sleeping bags and tents. Usually cut to a width of about one inche.

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