Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Bushwhacking Advice in SE AK

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default Bushwhacking Advice in SE AK

    I'm new to area and so far I'm pretty impressed by how difficult it is to bushwhack in the rainforest's of the SE. I've noticed on some of the trails I've been on that I can see some people wear caulked boots. So here are some questions ...

    Anyone use caulked boots?
    How do you best deal with the devils club? Leather gloves are a no brainer, but what about the rest of your body?
    Is keeping your feet dry simply a hopeless and impossible goal? Nobody really hikes in those "Alaskan Sneakers" do they?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LeakyBucket View Post
    How do you best deal with the devils club? Leather gloves are a no brainer, but what about the rest of your body?
    I'm not from south east but here in south central, I find a trekking pole handy for pushing the devils club stalks to the side.
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default

    So no one wears caulked boots? You mean to tell me no one has trouble slipping and sliding all over the place on the slopes in the SE. I've been looking at Hoffman boots. Anyone wear'em?

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    pow
    Posts
    21

    Default

    yeah, i live on prince of wales, i wear mine often. I have a pair of cut off tuffs that are caulked and also a pair of merrell hikers that are caulked. i use the merrells for hiking, hunting, everything. they arent waterproof or gore tex or anything, but i just slip on a pair of seal skinz socks over my smartwools and ive hiked in snow all day and have kept my feet warm and dry. my dad has a pair of mendls he had sent off to hoffman and got caulked. he likes them alot. id highly suggest spikey boots if youre going to be in the woods in se. they make life alot easier.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Thanks Svelte! Where did you get your merrells caulked? The meindls look real nice, but the price is a bit high for me. I was looking at these, but I'm worried they will have no support, and my foot will get beat up. I wish there were retailers locally so I could try them out.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    pow
    Posts
    21

    Default

    i got mine at a place called the clothes company in craig. i have friends that have bought them online. they come caulked. im not sure which website but ill try and find it and get back to you. mine are very supportive. they feel like any other kind of good hiker tha keeps your foot/ankle pretty isolated. i paid around 150 for mine if i can remember.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    pow
    Posts
    21

    Default

    http://www.hoffmanboots.com/ProductI...x?productid=MH

    didnt realize they were on hoffman. theyre good shoes. i like mine alot. size is pretty true, i wear a 10.5 in everything and they are are good 10.5 fit. i took the insoles out of mine and put in felt insoles, like most do with their xtra tuffs.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Thanks! I think I'll pick up a pair.

  9. #9

    Default

    I keep my feet dry-ish by wearing smartwool socks instead of cotton, and I usually take at least one extra pair, even on dayhikes. I just let the used ones air out on the pack whenever I get the chance. If I'm wearing gore-tex hikers I also bring along flip flops for creek crossings, otherwise the boots stay wet for days.

    I'd recommend wearing safety goggles for brush, and go over your pack & clothes to make sure nothing can get caught: tuck in strings, trim extra straps beforehand, put duct tape over pack frame pins so they won't pull out. I find that using an internal frame pack & lashing the sleeping pad vertically behind the pack helps a lot, compared to putting the pad on top of an outer frame pack. Wearing a handgun can get tricky... a chest holster usually works, but not when you end up rolling your body over a log.

    Bushwhacking's fun. My favorite place was a set of mountains sort of between Ketchikan & Metlakatla. We ended up crawling on our bellies to get under some brush, dragging our packs behind us. A few times I've had to lower my pack downhill using paracord so it wouldn't make me fall while climbing down. Devil's club does suck, though. Not much advice for that except leather gloves.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Thanks Wolfeye. I appreciate the tips. The whole dry feet thing seems like a lost cause. Either they're wet from the water on the outside or they're soaked with perspiration. It's a no win. The best advice is just to learn how to take care of your feet when they get wet.

    I did a get a pair of these http://www.kahtoola.com/microspikes.php I had the opportunity to use them this weekend in a long steep hike in an all day rain. Everything that could be wet and slippery was - mud, roots, logs, trail planks and rocks. They worked great! I love'em! I found a nice patch of salmon berries and I motored right up the slope after them with no problem, and it was pouring rain. We'll see how they do over time. The only complaint was if you walked on rocks for very long I started to feel the spikes through my sole. I think the problem is my boots are old and worn. I need some new ones with a fresh sole.

  11. #11
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Default

    I don't hike SE much but on Kodiak when Elk hunting I found a pair of instep crampons just the ticket. They are light, so carry them on my back is no big deal. They fit just about any boot. When you don't need them they are easy to get off. I got mine on Amazon. Just another alternative anyway.

    http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-Crab-Ins.../dp/B001KR9XFA
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Most people wear extratuffs out hunting. Caulked boots are used but not nearly as much. Devils club is just a pain. I never wear gloves I guess the places I hunt aren't really full of it. Juneau is definitely a bit brushier than other portions of SE, but not much. Get a good set of waterproof clothes for hiking. That does a good job of deflecting the devils club. Juneau is full of trails, rarely will you find a place that doesn't have a trail that can help cover the distance. When you're not on an established trail, again most places have a flagged trail that will take you through the ugly stuff. Generally if you're not on some sort of a trail in Juneau your going up the wrong (steep, brushy, nasty) side of the mountain.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  13. #13
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Soldotna AK, Eugene, OR
    Posts
    613

    Default

    I wear a pair of Viking Rubber boots, caulked and very water proof, you can get different length caulks. model Bushwacker #59. they should run about $120.00 a pair. I have worn them in snow at 20 below and glad I had them, I just make sure they get dried out with a boot dryer each night, you can put an insole in for more moisture absorption. I wear two pair of socks.
    Viking Rubber Caulk Boots Widely used by both tree planters and thinners, Viking boots are reasonably priced compared to full leather logger's caulks. Completely waterproof and offer an extra degree of chainsaw protection with a ballistic nylon boot facing and safety toe. For tree planters, they make for a great grip on slippery slopes, with superior arch support.
    12" uppers with snag proof back lacing (Timberwolf).
    12" uppers with draw string debris collar (Bushwacker).

    Air cushioned pockets for added comfort.
    Ankle protection, steel shank, steel toe and 100% canvas lining.
    Non-skid, mud grabbing caulk soles.
    Handcrafted piece by piece with no stitching or molding seams.
    In stock sizes: 5-12.



    I usually wear a size 13, and the size 12 work just fine. Good luck

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •