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Thread: Tried oven cleaner on primer pockets...

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Tried oven cleaner on primer pockets...

    I tried oven cleaner on a bunch of 30-06 primer pockets.

    NOT a good idea.

    Very toxic, turned the brass black and really did nothing to the carbon build up. Coca-Cola has worked best so far.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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    A Primer Pocket Uniformer in a drill motor is the best thing I've found for cleaning PPs.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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    Even a hand held tool is quick and efficient.

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    I recently bought one of those new sonic cleaners from Hornady. It does a great job on the case inside and out. The primer pockets come clean too.

    480 seconds is the longest cycle and 2 cycles does a great job. It is the ultimate lazy guy tool or efficient guy, what ever suits your style. If you dump your brass in there for 16 minutes you can do a lot of other prep stuff in the shop while they are getting clean, no effort at all.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=992327

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    Quote Originally Posted by marshall View Post
    I recently bought one of those new sonic cleaners from Hornady. It does a great job on the case inside and out. The primer pockets come clean too.

    480 seconds is the longest cycle and 2 cycles does a great job. It is the ultimate lazy guy tool or efficient guy, what ever suits your style. If you dump your brass in there for 16 minutes you can do a lot of other prep stuff in the shop while they are getting clean, no effort at all.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=992327
    It sounds tempting.

    Smitty of the North
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  6. #6

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    I use the original Gov't Springfield brass cleaning solution. 1 cup hot white vinegar one cup hot water and a tablespoon of non iodized salt. You can add a drop or two of liquid dish soap. Put the dirty brass into the solution and shake/agitate for 10 minutes, use plastic or glass container-empty plastic coffee grounds container works well. Remove from solution and rinse well. This will remove any and all dirt,discoloration, carbon fouling etc from brass. Note, it will not polish the brass but it will be clean and ready to polish if you want to. Also a good way to seperate brass from steel casings as the steel with turn black.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I tumble mine first and then re-size & de-prime. Since I always do around 300 to 500 cases at a time, the hand tool method makes for cramped up hands.
    I experimented with a bunch of stuff last year and found that a 3 hour soak in coca-cola makes the carbon in the primer pockets wipe right out with a Q-Tip. But it does not make it wash out. So I still end up using the hand tool method.
    I need to break down and get a sonic parts cleaner.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I need to break down and get a sonic parts cleaner.
    Howdy Float Pilot,

    Only $99.00 and well worth the savings in time spent doing other stuff. I run it through 2 480second cycles on most cases and 3 cycles on magnums. Magnums run a little hotter and generate more carbon, perhaps it's the powder. Either way this machine really works. After I pull them out I dump them in a stainless steel mixing bowl, give them a light spraying with simple green and rinse in the hottest water I can stand to put my hands in. I mix them around in the bowl to rinse and dump out the water. The brass is spotless, honest!

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    I even tried TANG mixed at about 500% the drinking level. It worked on the carbon, but actually stained the brass.
    After I get my brass washed with boiling water, I have them sit in a stainless noodle strainer on the wood stove all night. That makes them nice and dry.
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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Brass prep is easily my least favorite chore when reloading. I don't tumble my brass after every firing, and I rarely (if ever) clean the primer pockets. I just don't see the need to get the brass squeaky clean before each reloading session, so I guess my time-saver tip is to skip it as often as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    Brass prep is easily my least favorite chore when reloading. I don't tumble my brass after every firing, and I rarely (if ever) clean the primer pockets. I just don't see the need to get the brass squeaky clean before each reloading session, so I guess my time-saver tip is to skip it as often as possible.
    Yer rite, IMO.

    Brass doesn't NEED to be squeaky clean. They get cleaned enough when you wipe the lube off.

    My practice has been to get the carbon off the necks with steel wool, and more recently, I've gone to cleaning the rest of the case too.

    I've always cleaned the Primer Pockets though, because that seems important, even though, you don't see it, in at least some, of the Handloading Manuals.

    The PP Uniformer makes for easy seating below the case head the first time, and makes the cleaning easy thereafter.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Most of my experiments have been for accuracy, so I try to take out the variables by cleaning the heck out of the brass. I just reloaded some Lapua brass for the 15th time. So maybe it extends case life...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 6.5 swede 120gr loads with RL19 002.jpg  
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    Float Pilot:

    Excuse Me Sir, but

    When you clean brass, it gets thinner and thinner from the removal of the tarnish,

    BUT if you don't, it gets thicker and thicker from the grime.

    It stands to reason then, that dirty brass will outlast clean brass because of this coating that makes it stronger.

    There are other downsides to clean and shiny brass.

    It flashes in the sunlight and scares away Mooses.
    It makes you look like an Amateur, rather than an Old Salt.
    Dirty brass often fits tighter in the chamber, which results in better accuracy due to bullet alignment.

    I'm sure there are other sound reasons, but that's all the ones I can think of for now. Maybe, someone else can help.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    I tumble for 20 minutes and its plenty clean. I use a primer pocket brush just to make sure its clean and i am good to go

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    If you got a little time on your hands you might want to do a little reading here:

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=83572

    It works pretty good and there's a few reloaders around that subscribe to putting spent cases in water that's just about boiling or is boiling for several minutes to reduce neck splitting - kinda like a poor man's annealing job. Seems to work.

  16. #16

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    When I do it in the dark and dreary winter months I put a good movie in and grab the primer pocket cleaning tool and apply a liberal amount of "elbow grease" solution. I have never cleaned a pistol primer pocket, maybe I should. I have heard mixed reviews on it's benefits over the years. Still, if a guy wants to do it and believes it helps it probably will.

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    Since I don't reload a whole bunch of ammo for hunting each year, I just do the following with the brass:

    a. Brush the inside with a soft-nylon pistol bore brush of the right size, and wipe the outside of the cases (to remove dust, dirt, etc. before sizing)

    b. Neck-size as needed (you can full size if you like)

    c. Trim as needed, followed by cleaning the primer pocket with a RCBS or Lee primer-pocket cleaner (little and cheap hand-tool)

    d. Then I fill a mixing bowl of real hot water (at the kitchen sink), mix-in some liquid dish soap with the hot water, and dump the brass in the water

    e. When the water's temperature has dropped enough not to burn my hands, I use the same nylon brush to brush the inside of the cases

    f. Then I rinse each case with hot water to remove any traces of soap (I hold each case with a hemostat or a fishhook removal plier to avoid burning my fingers

    g. Then I take a hair dryer (blow-dryer), and dry any water residue on the cases with hot air

    h. I place the brass in a clean baking pan and bake on the lowest oven setting (usually from 100-200 degrees) for 30 minutes, then turn the oven off and let the brass cool overnight in the oven

    To dry the cases in the oven, I have built a loading block as follows: a piece of thick aluminum plate with four metallic legs. I drilled one small hole at each corner of the rectangular piece of aluminum, and used these holes for one self-tap stainless screw that is driven into each metallic leg. The legs each are just a narrow piece of aluminum that is bent at a right angle at one end. This right angle rests right under the top or rectangular piece of aluminum. The whole thing looks like a very small table.

    The rectangular piece of aluminum is a loading block, or just a block with holes of the right diameter to hold my .338WM brass upside down (primer pocket up, case mouths down pointing to the baking pan)

    bon appétit

  18. #18

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    A couple folks stated the tumbler "gets the primer pocket clean too". I have had bad expierences with putting unprimed brass in the tumbler because so many cases come out with the flash hole clogged tight with media...BE CAREFUL and inspect each round.
    I tumble the brass before removing the spent primer, lube case with Imperial (best I've found), inside neck with Lee case lube on Q-tip, de-prime / re-size, clean PP with RCBS brush or LEE PP cleaner, trim if necessary, deburr if trimmed, then wipe down with a cloth.

    I think some go way, way overboard. A friend thinks I do. He tumbles, sprays with One-Shot (one of the finest glues ever made IMO), resizes, then sprays and rolls in Brake cleaner, it takes all sizing dirty lube off. He shoots as well as I do.....More than one way to skin a cat.
    I was too cheap to buy a tumbler for 20 years, boy was it a good investment to get a starter Lyman....like new inside and out with the Green colored media from Sportsmans. A gallon will last about 3 years, and do 4 tumblers full, each tumbler full can be used over and over and will do thousands or rounds before it turns from light green to black. I remove the media from the tumbler and store it in an air tight gallon ziplock bag and it seems to stay fresher, and keep me out of spouse / vacuum trouble.

    If you still do not want to pay $60 for a tumbler, Never Dull impregnated cotton wadding like we used in boot camp works even better on the outside of the case for $6, and it keeps it's shine longer and can safely clean up dirty loaded ammo.

  19. #19
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Default Another choice for Cleaning Birchwood Casey

    BC makes a case prep/ case wash concentrate that sells for 10-12 bucks and a whole quart can do 8K cases. Not bad and does a reasonable job. It is an acid and detergent that is mixed with hot water. You store it in a plastic container, which must be why I saved all of my trail mix containers from Target!

    Matt

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    Small note on something that works for me:

    For those mentioning the primer flashhole getting clogged with media: I load in my garage, air compressor right there, so I blast 'em as I pull them out of the media, real quick, takes a lot of dust off but definitely clears the flashhole completely.

    On another note, gotta say I love Smitty's take on looking like an Old Salt with the old Brass vs. looking like an amateur....

    How about "Looking like a Professional, vs. looking like a Slacker....." Har Har

    I also was "Too Cheap" (not really a bad thing but wise maybe) to buy a tumbler for a long time, til my wifes Grandpa is showing me his stuff and it's all unused now and there is a nice Tumbler and tons of media sitting in his shop probably never to be used again. So I had to ask if I could try it out, and yes, He gave it to me.... with the advise, "Now you don't have to go doing that very often..." He is of course a total subscriber to Smitty's way of thinking.

    But For Me ?? Now I'm totally hooked on the Shiny New Professional Look......

    No other Sound or even Semi-sound reason in my book,
    but I feel like I know what I'm doing anyway, helps maybe, Shoot Better ??
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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