Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Could use some feedback

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    5

    Default Could use some feedback

    I just started taking pictures. I could use some feedback on some of my shots. Here is my link to my flickr page. http://www.flickr.com/photos/josephantonowicz

    Also I live in Anchorage. Is there any places of some waterfalls close by. I just moved here and I want to take lots of pictures before the winter and then some more in the winter time. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    I think the saturation is too high on many of them, making it look a bit 'fake'. Good pics though.

    As far as the waterfalls, head south toward Girdwood. Theres a few along the way and its a short trip...

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback. I just posted my pictures from today online.

  4. #4
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrow, Alaska
    Posts
    388

    Default

    Three points, and then some discussion:
    1. I don't like your style.
    2. You made a mistake on DSC_0109; I like that style! (Just that it should be cropped a little more to remove the shoreline at the top.)
    3. Most important: Neither 1) or 2) above is of any real significance.
    There is no reason you should aspire to a style that pleases me; the point isn't whether I like your images or not, but whether you like them... and whether you understand how to consistently shoot images in the style that you like.

    For that reason I just don't see a lot of value in posting a gallery of images and asking for comments. Some people will like them, some people will not, and most people won't make useful comments regardless.

    I would suggest studying other photographers work, looking for people who generally produce work that you like (not just individual images that you like, but photographers with clearly well developed style that appeals to you). Then try to find out as much as is possible about how that photographer produces that style. You might not find anything other than the images, which you can study, and you might find literally books about what/how/where/when/why and more than you can imagine!

    Sometimes the effort leads to strange things. For example, since I really like doing "people photography", folks like Dorothea Lange and Alfred Eisenstadt have always been interesting. I like to study their photographs in depth, so see what it is about them that I find attractive. I like reading things that Lange had to say about individual images, photography in general, etc. But I'll be honest, I don't learn much about photography from what she wrote, it's just entertaining theater! Eisenstadt is even worse! I like his photography and find his discussion is annoyingly useless. On the other hand Ansel Adams mostly took pictures of landscapes (which I have no interest in) and yet I find his discussion of how he thinks about photography to be very educational. But the study of what they were trying to do, whether it is what I see in a photograph, what someone else see's in it, or what the photographer said it was all about, is a way to learn how to create the same effect in your own work.

    As part of that effort it can often be useful to post one or more images to a forum such as this and ask specific questions. Such as with the one image of yours that I really do like (it's almost the only "people picture" you have), you might ask if it would be better to crop it differently, if it would be better to change the contrast up or down, if more or less sharpening would be better, or if a color version is better than monochrome. You might also ask about the potential for reshooting it, as in if the water background is good or bad, would a different focal length be better. Whatever you happen to think might change it, describe the change that you want and ask how to accomplish specifically that change.

    Maybe a better example would be any of the pictures with odd color balance and high saturation. You could start with an explanation that you do or don't like those effects, and then ask about either how to avoid or enhance them. Otherwise the responses will be conflicting simply because some people like that and some don't, neither of which is necessarily right or wrong.

  5. #5

    Default

    Great pics thanks for sharing!!
    ____________________
    Criminal Minds Episode | Episodes Smallville
    I'm sorry that people are so jealous of me... but I can't help it that I'm so popular.

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Get out and take as many photographs as you can. Much of what Floyd suggest will reveal itself in doing so. Take lots of pics and read all you can on Photocamel, Photo.net, Photography-on-the-net, and other popular photography forums. Practice things, specific tasks, perhaps focus on a perceived weakness, learn a new aspect of controlling your camera. Don't forget to have fun in the process. That is the whole point after all. Well, for most of us I suspect. Post here and post often. Welcome!



    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •