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Thread: Do you really trust that Bear fence while your away?

  1. #1
    Member DoubleSHOVEL85's Avatar
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    Default Do you really trust that Bear fence while your away?

    So lets say that you and your buddies were on Kodiak deer hunting and you have already downed a few at the beginning of your trip with still a few days left. Let's also say that the temps permit hanging the meat for a while. So you don't have to cut it short. Do you trust that fence enough to leave your meat cache with your base camp surrounded by it? If so how many of you have tried this? If not what is your plan for your cache? I only ask b/c this is contreversial to some the guys here on the island. I know you guys are prolly gonna tear this apart but eh...

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    Default Not just NO but.... NO!!!!

    Not for me... I DO NOT use a fence for such a purpose. I use a fence for two things:

    Protecting my gear from "the curious" (while I'm away) and
    giving me peace of mind while I'm sleeping....

    With that said I don't cache food inside the fence, I don't eat inside the fence and I never sleep without a gun close by...

    I say Hang'em... Hang'em HIGH....

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I agree with winmag, However you could use 2 fences. I saw photos from kodiak last year were members used a fence to safe guard their meat cache.

    For me food and meat stay away from everything else.

    Have a great hunt.

    Steve

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    Member DoubleSHOVEL85's Avatar
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    Yeah...That seems to be my opinion. I have heard of people doing this and figured it was quite possibly one of the most terrible ideas. I mean I'm sure intentions and the initial thought was good but the fact remains. It's is still just a deterrent. Most of the times bears touch those things is out of curiousity but give them a motive and I'm sure they would sacrifice a little pain for pleasure. The two fence thing I have seen before as well. Which sounds good, but more weight than a couple lengths of rope. Although I think I usually have more problems with Eagles and ravens then bears anyhow. Let's not forget that the rivers haven't been so plentiful with salmon, on Kodiak, this year. I'm axious to hear if anyone has had their share of problems with them brown and furries this year. My wife tells me that she has seen a few of them on the buskin this year, atleast 3. Not to mention the 2 on the base that tried to setup shop on it.


    Hope the season has been good too you guys.

  5. #5
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    I trust my bear fence while I'm away a lot more than I trust it when I'm there.

  6. #6

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    I trust it. Check out the bear tracks that lead up to my meat pole in the background. Pretty happy when I returned from hunting at the end of the day and saw that.

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    Let me preface my remarks by saying that I do not share because I believe this to be "the right way" to do it. In fact, I still have mixed thoughts on this subject. This has simply been my recent experience, and may add to the discussion. I have hunted Kodiak the last two years, both in August. The first year we hunted deer. The second we took mountain goats. Both of these hunts lasted approximately four days each, mostly due to weather and meat care concerns. The bane of hunting in August I realize, but the island is fantastically beautiful and uncrowded during that time of year.

    Anyway, last year (deer only) we were using a bear fence for camp/tent security and stashing the meat a safe distance away. The refuge LEO flew in to check on us and flat out told us to put the meat inside the fence with us if we had any hope of taking it home. We suspiciously obliged, and the meat stayed "inside" with us for two additional days. We saw three bears in our area that year, and one of them observed us from a distance during the late evening. We were awakened at night by a visitor who sniffed around and then peacefully and quietly left. The fence did its job. However, it is more than a bit edgy to think that a couple of thin strands of cord/wire and a few AA batteries were all that stood between us and an ugly night.

    This year we went ahead and did the same by putting the goat meat inside with us. It remained that way for three days. We did not see any bears this year, and had no uncomfortable experiences.

    I originally purchased the bear fence to "protect" camp items while gone hunting, and possibly give me some peace of mind while sleeping. I still tend to believe that is what they are primarily for even though I have had two safe hunts with meat inside. I have not yet decided if this is the future for me, or if it is blind luck that I've been pressing. I have also recently hunted the Brooks, and did not use one. We stashed the meat/food away from camp. We slept good and had no incidents. I have also heard of hunters leaving camp unprotected, and putting cook items/food/meat in a separate area with the bear fence. More than one way to look at this. Again, I'm not sure if I did the "right" or "best" thing on Kodiak the last two years. I hope many who have used bear fences recently take the time to post on this subject about their given experiences. I'm interested to get a feel from the masses or maybe a unique perspective that I have not thought of. Hope this adds. . . .

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    First off, I believe in bear fences....if you've ever tested a properly grounded/opposite pole three strander you will believe too

    In this situation, I would be hesitant to put the meat inside the fence with me, I would opt for either two fences, or as said....hang em high. A bear will largely just be curious about your camp, but he's got a vested interest in that meat, and in the case that it decides that meat means more than a little pain, he's gonna be inside that perimeter with you and not in calm state.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I hunted Kodiak in August in '08. We ate inside the fence. In fact the weather for two days was so crappy we ate inside our vestibule. At some point all the wisdom of not eating near your tent goes out the window when it's blowing 40 and raining sideways. After we bagged a deer we boned it out, put it in ziplock bags and put it in a cooler with snow we got from a nearby snowfield. We knew there were going to be no trees, so this was the original plan. This cooler went inside our fence with us. Not saying it's the right way, but it's the way we did it and we had no problems.

    Kodiak, and other bear prone areas, are a big area. If we'd been going to where there were trees we would have hung the deer high AND put a fence around the trees. The time of year and quality of the local fish runs count also. In August, when there are tons of fish, and you hunt away from the rivers, there are very few bears interested in you. In fact, our gut pile from that deer sat for 48 hours until we flew away without even a single raven pecking at it. I was shocked, I figured from all the stories that every bear on the island would be there to visit us.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  10. #10

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    IME, fences really work. I've never seen a bear actually hit by one, but I know that most of the field crews (people stationed in a weather port with food for two months) that use them have little to no bear problems with a fence on. One thing to remember is that if the bear actually gets shocked, its going to be way way worse than you'll ever experience. they're standing on bare ground with damp feet (i.e. no insulative qualities) and likely touching the fence with their nose or mouth. I do not recommend this and haven't tried it, but if you really don't believe me. Set up a fence in your back yard, shuffle around a bit in bare feet and touch the wire with your tongue. I guarantee it will make you not want to go near that fence again.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I reached under my fence to grab something I'd forgot on the inside. I contacted the wire with my right hand while my left was planted on the ground (I was on my knees in raingear). I nearly pissed myself. It was easily ten times as bad as tounching the wire while wearing boots..which I have also done.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    As fate would have it I was doing some research on this topic. Please note the test conditions. I found it very informative. J.

    http://www.fs.fed.us/t-d/pubs/htmlpu...2305/index.htm

  13. #13
    Member DoubleSHOVEL85's Avatar
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    Default Hopefully they aren't just playing us for fools...

    OldRgr,
    Awesome! I really appreciate the info you provided. Well here's to hoping those guys never figure out to take out the batteries!

  14. #14

    Default How to test the fence.

    I think another good way to test it AND teach your small child a lesson, is to set it up in your front yard, tell your small barefoot child not to touch the fence, then wait ten minutes and see the childs reaction when he or she does touches it, cause you know he or she is going to.

    Robert

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    Default Finley's Tripod

    I think I know the location on SW Kodiak, let me give you a little history.
    After shooting a small buck we set up the tripod about 100yds from camp complete with fence EXACTLY as shown in your picture right down to the same charging unit.(Yes we turned it on AND tested it) The next morning we had bear tracks in the mud across the lagoon but no meat pole at the end of them, we found it 150yds away drug mostly over beach logs. The wire and charging unit was tangled up with it. The charger still clicking away! (Nope no deer)
    After a few days we hauled the tripod back and hung 4 more deer for 5 days with no more problems.
    Previous trips to this area and others around the state have yielded results similar to yours. We run a fence around camp and one around the meat plus keep the guns loaded. One occation on Kodiak the fence kept the magpies and foxes out for 6 days (they were on the scraps 15 min. after we took it down for plane pickup) and one brownie that was haulin *** away, unconfirmed contact.
    Do we think the fences work? Yup! Do we totally trust them? NOPE!

    By the way if anyone sees a bear with the backpack I left inside the fence tell him I want it back!
    RASTUS

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I look at the fence kind of like those invisible fences for dog. They will both stop an animal that approaches them at a reasonable speed (read catiously) but will have little effect on an animal who is hell bent charging in there. My buddy got one of those invisible fences and I watched as his dog tore across it at full speed. I saw him twitch as it popped him 7 or 8 times. What was hilarious is watching him try and get BACK into the yard!! He knew he was in trouble but every time he got close to the yard POP, POP, POP! Poor puppy! LMAO!! As long as the bear is cautiously approaching and gets a hot pop on the nose I am sure it will be effective but if he just bombs in there he will blow right through it before he even realizes he has been shocked.

  17. #17
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Interesting thread, I've never used one but have always hunted from a boat and not needed to worry about what happens at night, but,

    here's an idea I've been considering, for your opinions,

    Have a Bull Elk Permit for Raspberry this fall, gonna be more than one pack load of meat, if not several, so the quick escape from the killsite won't be happening this time. So, will it work to post a Bear Fence around the killsite while we're packing loads down to the boat?

    Thinking I would remove the temptation of the gutpile fragrance by moving the meat loads a hundred yards away or so from the carcass, then compiling it in bags, under tarps, with a Fence around it and a few Choice Capilene shirts that have been worn a while, we can all relate to that smell, eh?

    It's been a hard summer for Salmon, Bears and Elk Hunters have a poor history of cooperation around here, This idea gonna work to get my entire Bull out?

    Or is the gutpile and carcass teaser gonna get that Bear running for more and "Right thru that Fence?"
    Or is returning to a "fenced in pile of meat" going to be a Really Risky thing to do, (as in FRUSTRATED BEAR) and us both outside the fence?
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  18. #18
    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    I have heard more than one individual on Afognak going this route and being successful at not losing meat. I will go this route next time my self.

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Interesting thread, I've never used one but have always hunted from a boat and not needed to worry about what happens at night, but,

    here's an idea I've been considering, for your opinions,

    Have a Bull Elk Permit for Raspberry this fall, gonna be more than one pack load of meat, if not several, so the quick escape from the killsite won't be happening this time. So, will it work to post a Bear Fence around the killsite while we're packing loads down to the boat?

    Thinking I would remove the temptation of the gutpile fragrance by moving the meat loads a hundred yards away or so from the carcass, then compiling it in bags, under tarps, with a Fence around it and a few Choice Capilene shirts that have been worn a while, we can all relate to that smell, eh?

    It's been a hard summer for Salmon, Bears and Elk Hunters have a poor history of cooperation around here, This idea gonna work to get my entire Bull out?

    Or is the gutpile and carcass teaser gonna get that Bear running for more and "Right thru that Fence?"
    Or is returning to a "fenced in pile of meat" going to be a Really Risky thing to do, (as in FRUSTRATED BEAR) and us both outside the fence?

  19. #19
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    KR, I would go with that plan. A frustrated bear won't likely be any worse than one sleeping on top of your dirt covered meat pile.

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