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Thread: Tipping of Services

  1. #1
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    Default Tipping of Services

    I would appreciate examining any input in this area. Can there be (as there is in our restaurant industry) a percentage award for services?

    I am aware it has been discussed before, but times do change, and I would value feedback from any forum member.

    I am looking for what one would tip a guide for services associated in a remote lodge experience on a river over several days.

    Thanks...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Generally up at the lodge I work at the guides get tipped $75-$100 a day per pair of guests (each guide takes two guests for the week).
    The houskeeping and kitchen staff get about $200-$300 per week per two guests. The housekeeping/kitchen staff pool their tips from all the guests and divide it equally amongst themselves. These are base guidelines and can be adjusted depending on service rendered.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard R. Rosenberg View Post
    I would appreciate examining any input in this area. Can there be (as there is in our restaurant industry) a percentage award for services?

    I am aware it has been discussed before, but times do change, and I would value feedback from any forum member.

    I am looking for what one would tip a guide for services associated in a remote lodge experience on a river over several days.

    Thanks...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    Well I guess that would all depend on the service and the fishing. Now if you have great service and no fish, I would tip they guy, at least enough to cover the gas on that day. If you got great service and fish, tip a little more, if he is a jerk.........nothing, if he is jerk and you get fish, nothing. There is nothing that says you have to tip, but if you feel one is in order then do so, Like for me I dont make a lot and when I do get a chance to go fishing with a guide and he is good and the fish he puts me on is nice even if it is only one I will usually give him 50 to 100 dollar tip. I don't keep fish so the cleaning and all that doesn't happen. What it really comes down to is how you feel and the service you get, in a remote lodge you will get a lot of attention and caderd to so if you are happy I would give a little more if you feel it was earned so to speak. This is just a suggestion but just from my friends point of view he would rather have you come back and fish with him then give him a tip. I can understand this because a trip is more then a tip and it keeps him working.

    Hope that helps.

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    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    Generally up at the lodge I work at the guides get tipped $75-$100 a day per pair of guests (each guide takes two guests for the week).
    The houskeeping and kitchen staff get about $200-$300 per week per two guests. The housekeeping/kitchen staff pool their tips from all the guests and divide it equally amongst themselves. These are base guidelines and can be adjusted depending on service rendered.
    Are you friggin' kidding me? Is that pesos? How much is that in American money?

    When I go for a day fishing trip on the Little Su, I'm fishing with the guide/owner. For a $130 trip, I tip $20.

    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    The houskeeping and kitchen staff get about $200-$300 per week per two guests.'.
    That's just stupid. If I'm already paying $5 to $600 per day per person, the houskeeping and kitchen staff get a heart felt "thank you".
    brad g.
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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Tipping shouldn't depend on how many fish you caught - you may be a crap fisherman who doesn't listen, and no amount of guiding is going to help that.

    The few times I have been guided, I have tipped all but once. The one time I didn't tip was when the guide was confused by the conditions, and chose to stick to his routine rather than do something a little different and maybe represent himself better.

    When I have tipped, I try to go about 15% minimum, and I never make a big deal of it. I thank the guide for their time and their knowledge, and commend them on a good days' work on behalf of a demanding client.

    As a guide, I have been tipped (often) and not tipped (rarely). The folks that tip seem to appreciate a broader view than just the fish or the fishing...a little natural history and some local lore goes a long way, and babywipes, good scotch, or good cigars take care of the rest. The folks that don't tip are low-to-intermediate level fisherMEN (always men, always 30-45 years old) who think they know what they are doing and don't listen worth a ****.

    It is a personal subject, but one that should be on the list of every prospective client coming to AK - how to be guided 101, client expectations 101, and tipping 101.

    If you feel the guide deserves it, tip him. Tip just like you would if you were in a fine restaurant - 15-20%. If you feel the guide didn't work as hard as he could have, tell him - don't just give him a token tip, or no feedback at all. Tell him what you thought of his performance...it might keep him from repeating his mistakes.

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    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
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    If one more guide tells me, "you should have been here last week", my head will explode
    brad g.
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  7. #7

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    I've only been on a few charters, but when me an the wife went halibut fishing this year the guide we went out with was great. Good attitude and let us fish without pressuring us to keep small ones. We then tried for kings with no luck, but the effort he put in is what earned him the tip, not the fish. I think that the attitude and helpfulness of the guide should make or break their tip.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    If one more guide tells me, "you should have been here last week", my head will explode
    Any guide that tells you that probably shouldn't be guiding.

    The best day of the year to fish is the day the client is there. Period.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    Are you friggin' kidding me? Is that pesos? How much is that in American money?

    When I go for a day fishing trip on the Little Su, I'm fishing with the guide/owner. For a $130 trip, I tip $20.
    He was talking about guides who work at a lodge, not owner/operators.

    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    That's just stupid. If I'm already paying $5 to $600 per day per person, the houskeeping and kitchen staff get a heart felt "thank you".
    Again, these workers are usually not the owners.

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    I think I go into a trip with a basic set of expectations / services expected from a guide, waitress, server, etc. And if those expectations / services are met, then a tip is appropriate. I don't feel my expectations are unreasonable. I expect to be treated as a fellow human being, to be respected in my experiences, & to have the guide / server do the best job they can with the circumstances involved.
    I have not seen an 'industry standard' tip being published, but I believe as many have said already "A TIP IS EARNED". A good starting point IMHO for a tip is 10% of cost. If expectations are minimally met = 10%. If exceeded = more than 10% depending on specifics (I have tipped as much as 50% of the cost for service that I felt went above and beyond).
    On my trip this year I tipped all but one guide. If my wife had anything to do with it, that guide would have been beat to ###, neutered, & shot. The services were SO FAR BELOW minimal that I, in good conscience, can not recommend that service or atleast that guide. Specifics- was rude toward my wife, pressured all aboard to keep little fish, belittled others (wife included) when they decided to release halibut, acted rushed, stated several times that he had a specific time he would cease fishing, spend majority of time talking with a young single female aboard, several times took the rod from my wifes hand when she (in his opinion) was reeling too slow, kept putting out more lines (at the end) so my wife would be "satisfied", etc. I could go on, but I am beginning to turn angrier to say the least.

  11. #11

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    I would say drifter has it right. From what I hear about $100/guide day is considered a good tip for a guide. This probably varies with the # of clients/guide, which I'm guessing is pretty low at the mid-range to higher end lodges. I've not heard it talked about in terms of percentages.

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    Quote Originally Posted by salmon_bone View Post
    He was talking about guides who work at a lodge, not owner/operators.

    Again, these workers are usually not the owners.
    Again, about $20 to $40 a day for the guide, and a heart felt "thank you" for the staff.
    brad g.
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    Grew up being a first mate for my dad I got spoiled on what to expect on a guided trip. And know fish can't be caught every day. But I expect the guide to at least try to locate fish.

    As for a resturant, if I have to wait long for refills or place an order and you are not busy I leave $0.25. I understand if you are busy and have to wait. But not when there are only 3 tables of patrons and I have been waiting 20 mins for my first cup of coffee and the other tables are ready had refills during that time

  14. #14

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    I have tipped from zero to 35% to fishing guides. Zero has only happened twice, and 35% has only happened a couple of times. The vast majority (80%) fall in the 10-15% range. The size of the tip is based on how hard the guide works, not how many fish I caught. A guide that fishes me 12 hours a day is going to get a far larger tip than when they fish me only 6 hours a day. When I stay at an all inclusive lodge, I generally give the tip to the manager/owner at the end of the trip to split amongst the entire staff (including housekeeping, cooks, guides, etc) and it's also in the 10-15% range of the entire trip cost, so for a $4,000 trip that would be around $400-600.

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    Member fish2live's Avatar
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    I am so tired of more and more people having their jobs subsidized by "tips". The whole idea behind tips was a "gratuity" for going above and beyond what a job paid. Now everyone in any service industry wants a tip for doing their job. Should we tip garbage men and electrical workers? What about your mayor or governor? Oh wait that would be a bribe.

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    Default A tip is a personal thing

    Ability to pay has something to do with this. For instance, the person who saves for years for that special trip to Alaska (or wherever) plans for tips at a certain rate - well, they are doing what they can. Some of these remote trips are sold on the concept of "all inclusive" and charge a high price for that. Part of the appeal is to be "Taken care of" not "taken". No the guides are not the owners but they should be paid by the owners to provide that expected level of care. A reasonable tip on top of that is a way to say thanks for the good service. These are not hairdressers.

    Having years in the tour industry previously, tips do come based on performance. It is just the way it is. that performance can be catching fish or treating a customer well.

    Comments about the customer not following directions... well you need to question your abilities as a guide if this is common. No matter what you do there still always be that arrogant so & so. But that's life.

    I would also observe that on many (not all) charters here in our lovely waters have quite frankly gone downhill. Non-local guides / captains have something to do with that. Smaller fish and time-lines that folks adhere to have something to do with that. Word to the wise - if you are booking a charter in Alaska, do your research and find out if the outfit you are looking at suits your needs. This does not mean looking at the reference list the charter provides.

    A person's judgment of success on a trip varies. Somebody catching their very first halibut might be greatly satisfied with that 20 pounder. But the person who looked at the web site and booklets seeing all about the record setting catches and thinking they will get something big is not going to be happy with that same 20 pounder. A lot of this is about the expectations set by the charter outfit. --- and the tips follow those expectations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nuprofessor View Post
    And if those expectations / services are met, then a tip is appropriate. I don't feel my expectations are unreasonable.
    I disagree, and this deals with any service that encounters tips. If your expectations are met, then you have paid a fair price, already arranged for. If your expectations are exceeded, then a tip may be called for.

    Quote Originally Posted by fish2live View Post
    I am so tired of more and more people having their jobs subsidized by "tips". The whole idea behind tips was a "gratuity" for going above and beyond what a job paid. Now everyone in any service industry wants a tip for doing their job. Should we tip garbage men and electrical workers? What about your mayor or governor? Oh wait that would be a bribe.
    Its just ridiculous, there are tip jars and printed reciepts everywhere asking for tips. A price for goods/services are laid out and people shouldnt be pressured into tipping just because its become customary, or normal. If you get service above and beyond and you feel like tipping, by all means, do it, but isnt that just good customer service which should be standard anyways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by outnaboutnak View Post
    I disagree, and this deals with any service that encounters tips. If your expectations are met, then you have paid a fair price, already arranged for. If your expectations are exceeded, then a tip may be called for.



    Its just ridiculous, there are tip jars and printed reciepts everywhere asking for tips. A price for goods/services are laid out and people shouldnt be pressured into tipping just because its become customary, or normal. If you get service above and beyond and you feel like tipping, by all means, do it, but isnt that just good customer service which should be standard anyways.
    I'm completely in agreement with you on these points. The one that gets me is paying $4 for a cup of coffee and they still expect a tip!?!?!?! To me, that's just crazy. I never tip my hairdresser cuz she never talks and that makes me uncomfortable. I feel part of "customer service" is making the customer REALLY want to come back again. The price I pay for the haircut is covered in what she charges me...anything above and beyond that is if she made it a pleasant experience, which she does not do. I go back because she cuts hair well, and to some people, that in itself may be enough to ensure a tip, but not for me.

    Just trying to pertain the fishing guide experience to another real life situation. I feel that you are paying for that service, period! If the service is phenomenal and you thoroughly, completely enjoyed yourself, you're likely to return. I don't see where the tip is necessary. You've already paid for that service and I would feel like they are simply "schmoozing" you to get even more money from you.

    But that's just me...OP did say they were interested in any opinons on this matter, so that's mine!
    ~ Kristie~
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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Folks who have worked for tips are the best tipper IMHO. They understand what you are doing and can tell the difference between getting by and gettin' er done.

    I'm a firm believer in tipping for fishing guides. It ends up balancing out in the end as the trips end up costing quite a bit less.
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    I think what we're seeing in many service industries is that the workers are being paid less and less, so they try to make up the difference by asking for tips. I agree that in the past, tips were considered as a 'thank you' for going above and beyond. But not so much nowadays. In some service sectors, the workers need tips just to get to minimum wage. Sad.

    I know for a fact that some saltwater charter boats don't pay the crew member(s). They work strictly for tips. No tips, no pay. Sadder still.......

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