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Thread: What the fungi?

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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Default What the fungi?

    Our lawn is covered in mushrooms and I don't know wild mushroom identification from a hole in the wall. Can anyone recommend a good book or something to help me figure out how to avoid psychosis or toxic shock syndrome? Thanks


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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Our's has been too this year so I did some research. Do a google search for edible alaska mushrooms for starters and then pick up the book Alaska's Mushrooms by Harriette Parker. So far I have eaten Shaggy manes, inky caps and black morrels out of my yard. I think there are some more edible ones, but I havent been able to positively id them beyond a reasonable doubt. Be careful with inky caps and Shaggy's though because you cant drink alcohol for a few days after you eat them!
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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    The top picture looks like bolete...and if so is some very fine eating. We have those growing all over the woods around here this year.
    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...1t:429,r:7,s:0

    Best to find someone knowledgeable to go with you and teach you about the edible mushrooms and make a positive identification. A good field book is also a must. I recommend the novice shrumer stay away from all the gilled mushrooms to start off.


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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Lori, I have heard that there are several Bolete's that are unsafe to eat and they are hard to tell apart. Is that true. I have had a ton of them on my property this year. I have heard that they are one of the best tasting mushrooms up here though if you can find the kings! Here is a small group of inky caps and one large shaggy mane that I went out and gathered a few minutes ago. They are thick this year!

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    I don't want to eat them, I want to get rid of them. How do you keep them from growing all over the yard?

    Seems with all the rain they are every where and it seems they take over under my birch trees too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaterWolf View Post
    I don't want to eat them, I want to get rid of them. How do you keep them from growing all over the yard?
    While you might consider them unsightly, mushrooms are a sign that you have a functioning soil food web, which is a good thing both for the health of your lawn and the health of those using your lawn (you and any kids that might run around). There are chemicals that could rid your lawn of mushrooms, but they'll harm everything else as well.

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'N'Photos View Post
    Lori, I have heard that there are several Bolete's that are unsafe to eat and they are hard to tell apart. Is that true. I have had a ton of them on my property this year. I have heard that they are one of the best tasting mushrooms up here though if you can find the kings! Here is a small group of inky caps and one large shaggy mane that I went out and gathered a few minutes ago. They are thick this year!

    Yes there are inedible boletes, just as there are inky caps that can make you ill. It is so important to positively identify any mushrooms that you put in your mouth (or even touch for that matter) Personally I don't consider any edible wild mushroom to be completely fool-proof. That is why I do recommend boletes for begginers because they are a variety that are "easier" to identify. Books and internet are good sources of information...But like I said above, if possible, go out with a knowledgeable person first and do some in the field learning. I've been doing this for a while, but I am still learning and generally stick with the ones I know for sure.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boletaceae
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M7_7xy142w


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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    Books and internet are good sources of information...But like I said above, if possible, go out with a knowledgeable person first and do some in the field learning.

    Lori, thanks for the advice. I work with someone who has been asking for some mushrooms and has offered to help me identify what I've got, but I keep missing her schedule.

    I've also thought about buying a portabella kit, but the sellers won't ship them up here.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    The top pic is a bolete. The toxic variety is rare in AK according the folks at the Cooperative Extension and can be ID'd easily.

    Boletes don't have radial gills like "normal" mushrooms. Their gills look like sponge and they're the only mushroom in AK with that type of gill arrangement so they're very easy to ID. The color of that sponge is the key to ID'ing them. If the sponge is dark; brown to black do not eat them but if it's white, cream, tan, pale orange (I've never seen an orangey one but the books say they exist) or yellowish they're safe.

    The ones that grow in my yard tend to be yellowish. The thing about boletes is they get wormy very quickly. If you find them bigger than a hamburger bun they're almost always maggoty. Even the smaller ones will have a few worms. I don't know what sort of bug they are but the worms are tiny and clear and are usually found in either the stem and/or in the gills. I just cook them along with the mushroom as the garlic and butter dissolve them pretty well.

    Bolete gills are edible but because of the worm thing many pickers remove them. They are easily removed by gently scraping with a spoon or you can slice the cap first and with the tip of your knife pull the gills away.

    Boletes are delicious with a mild but savory, almost truffle-like flavor.

    I picked two this morning out of my front yard and they are on my saute' docket. A few worms, but I've got plenty of garlic.
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    Member Bigrob's Avatar
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    Default Boletes

    You can also dry them in a food dehydrator or can them. They taste great in the middle of winter.

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    Anyone know where I can find some good pysilocybes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    Anyone know where I can find some good pysilocybes?
    Yea, about 4500 miles SE of Anchorage along the TX/MX border. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKGUPPY View Post
    Yea, about 4500 miles SE of Anchorage along the TX/MX border. )
    Sorry Gup, Peyote's not a pysilocybe... it's an organic, but not a pysilocybe...

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    I still have not eaten any local wild fungus, but I am trying to learn more about them - and I think it'll be a good thing to read up on during the winter.

    I found an interesting (albeit old) blog on alaska mushrooms:
    http://alaskanmushrooms.blogspot.com/
    Someone on that blog posted this:
    Mushroom edibility test. Boil water put 5 garlic cloves in then a couple of the mushrooms that you want to check in. If the garlic turns dark the mushrooms are not edible! This is a fail proof way to find edible mushrooms.
    Anyone ever heard this before? Seemed a little crazy.

    I think I'll pick up a copy of the Harriette Parker book, Alaska's Mushrooms: A Practical Guide
    http://www.amazon.com/Alaskas-Mushro.../dp/0882404539

    I'm pretty sure mine are birch bolete's, although not sure enough to eat them, yet.

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    Default anyone know what these are?

    the single one was BRIGHT yellow, and dimpled like a golfball, about 7" across.
    i'm sure it was not edible, just wonder what it was. some smaller ones of the same type were coming up, they had veiled gills and some white tubercules not present on the one i took a photo of.
    i think the big bunch is some sort of pholiotis.
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    Default mushrooms

    Just picked and canned this batch of Chantrelle mushrooms here in Washington. In Cordova, the Chantrelles I've seen are brown, while these are bright yellow. One of the tell tale signs of a Chantrelle is the gills run down into the stem. In Cordova, two of the most popular mushrooms to pick are Angel Wings and Hedgehogs. I've never picked the Hedgehogs myself, but I've taken thousands of Angel Wings. They are pure white and grow on dead wood. They are flat and many times grow in layers. I'll see if I can find some pix to share. Angel Wings are exceptionally tasty and my daughter loves them on her hamburgers. We also saute them, fry them, and use them in spaghetti dishes.
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    Here's a good pic of Angel Wings. http://media.photobucket.com/image/r...AngelWings.jpg
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    do you have morles in alaska

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'N'Photos View Post
    Be careful with inky caps and Shaggy's though because you cant drink alcohol for a few days after you eat them!
    Why is that?

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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Not sure why that is AK. They somehow react with the alcohol and it can increase your heart rate and make your limbs tingle. Heart attacks have happened in rare cases. Although like everything it affects everyone differently. I had a beer the day after I ate those and it didnt have much affect, just a little tingly. But a neighbor of mine said he did it once long ago and felt like he was having a heart attack and it was two days after he ate them.
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