Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: mix pups and hunting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    28

    Default mix pups and hunting

    First post on here, but figured that I'd ask some experts for opinions/advice. First a confession....I bought a golden retriever pup (mixed with full size poodle). Yea, I know, a "designer dog" kind of thing, but I did do a little research and found that poodles were once used for upland gamebirds in Europe. Anyway, looking for anyone that may have experience with this mix and training for hunting. He's seems not too concerned with loud noises yet (he's only 8 weeks old though). No gunfire yet, we'll break him in a little later, starting with a .22 from a distance to see how he reacts. He's real interested (and followed a scent trail) of a ptarmagin wing off a bird my boy droped this year. I've got high hopes, but wanted to see what you all have to say. Thanks for your help, Herm

  2. #2
    Member kylemac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    90

    Default

    I knew folks in Florida who used big poodles as retrievers - great swimmers - and naturally goldens are good bird dogs as well. I have seen poodle bred with black lab before and been duck hunting with one that did great. So, although, I have never seen poodle/golden, I imagine the results would be very similar. I think it just depends on if they have hunting blood left in them or not. Sounds like yours may -- good luck.
    Kyle

  3. #3
    Member Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    735

    Default

    I am a believer that with time and patience, one can train almost any dog to be a bird hunter. I personally choose to hunt with well bred dogs that have a history of hunting experience. It gives you the best chance of success, but even well bred dogs are not a guarantee.
    As you have said, both the breeds you mixed were once hunting dogs. Full size poodles are still excepted in an AKC Retriever Hunt Test and there are a few out there that do well at that game. The particular dogs that were bred to produce your pup may or may not have been from a hunting stock. You could find out if you want to, but at this point it doesnt matter. You have the dog you have and if you want it to hunt, go for it. You have nothing to lose and it might become an awesome hunting partner. At the very least you will have great canine companion who will work to please you and enhance your life.
    If you are new to gun dog training there are lots of resources out there to help get started in the right direction.
    Good luck and enjoy your new friend.

  4. #4
    Member TMCKEE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    236

    Default

    If a Lab and Poodle mix is a labradoodle, then what do you call a golden retriever and poodle mix? I'm hoping it's something cool like golden retoodle!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Best bird dog I EVER had was an OOPS! breeding. Seems a German Shorthair male had the HOTS for a beautiful English Pointer female and six foot high fence be darned. They never did figure how he got in there short of climbing the fence.
    That female mix was a bird hunting machine. Not a day of formal training in her life. Just everyday stuff with a hard headed 14yo boy(ME!!!) to lead the way. SUPERB nose, PERFECT point, excellent mark on downed birds, retrieve to hand great majority of the time (drop at feet other times), etc. Used her on wild quail and planted chukar & pheasant. Only thing she would not do is pick up a dove. She would find it with no problems and wait for you to show up, then she would move on after you picked it up. Even if said dove was only wounded and a runner- NO PICKY UPPY!!

  6. #6
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    389

    Default

    First of all, I'm no expert or pro. It depends on the individual pup, but give it a try -- just use a step-by-step approach, retrieving at his age show be ALL fun, keep the number of retrieves per session minimal (2-3 max, and quit while he's still raring to go), keep your sessions short (puppies don't have the attention span & get bored), and don't push introducing guns or water. Obedience, socialization, exploring the world with confidence, and much more goes into making a nice hunting dog. A couple good books:

    "Retriever Puppy Training : The Right Start For Hunting" by Cherylon Loveland & Clarice Rutherfood - http://www.gundogsupply.com/bkk-0523.html

    "The 10-Minute Retriever : How To Make A Well-Mannered, Obedient, Enthusiastic Gun Dog in 10 Minutes A Day" by John & Amy Dahl - you can find it at Amazon.com

    Evan Graham's "Puppy Program" DVD I haven't seen, but a lot of people like it. His "Smartwork For Retrievers", vol. 1 covers basic training, step-by-step. His books/DVDs are available at http://rushcreekpress.com/allproducts.html

    Keep us posted, ask questions and good luck!

    Karen

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default

    I got the chance to see a Pudelpointer work and looked into the breed for an article. Pointers bred with poodles a very long time ago by European aristocracy they were a “designer dog” . So designer or not producing dogs that work differently is no crime just so there are enough takers for all the pups. Mackey’s dogs are not a breed but a blend. But back to retrieving, starting early is the best and encouraging FUN retrieving in the house in a hallway will engrain the desire. Don't over do it and leave the pup wanting.
    The other suggestions are good but also look up Sound Beginnings by Jackie Mertens, a very positive approach to early puppy training. I got it as a refresher when I got my Lab 8 years ago. Poodles can be very sensitive, they are smart and the traditional Lab training may not be flexible enough for this dog. Depending on the golden line you may have a blend that has a party going on in its head all the time. You want that happy attitude to work for you so reward is going to be key. Goldens beat the pants off of Labs in ring obedience. I know some poodles that are also very good in agilty and service skills and they crave positive training but can be crushed by punishment.

    Get some wings to play with too. I save wings off of our spruce hens, ducks etc. You don’t need the entire bird until the dog is older. I'm not a fan of letting pups beat up live birds. You can put them in a pen with a clip wing to get them to chase but don't let it go farther. Our properly forced fetched dog still likes to throttle my garden gloves and shrews the cat leaves behind. When she was a 10 weeks old pup I thought letting her chase live clip wing pigeons was a good idea. It was cruel to the pigeons and began a tough habit to break.

    You may know already but you will need to groom this dog. One of my groomer advertisers is adamant about getting your pup into a groomer early and get them used to the process early. You may be able to clip him yourself but get a base clip and find a groomer that will show you how.
    http://www.alaskadognews.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •