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Thread: Self processing you're own meat...

  1. #1
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    Default Self processing you're own meat...

    Hello all, I find myself on Youtube alot nowadays, as I've gotten moose meat from two people, & they've been very generous with giving away the meats...I can pretty much choose what I want. Now, in the past, I've just cut out the Tenderloins, back strap, & took some ribs.

    But today, from what I've watched on Youtube, I know exactly how to get the cuts of meat I want! I use a sawzall to get the tough cuts out, like the T-bone, or the Rib steaks, & I use the METAL blades, as they use up less cutting space, & the shavings are much smaller & easier to clean.

    I can't believe the abundance of information out on the INET on how to butcher cow sized animals! & with out a butcher shop, out here, the sawzall is a great subsistute.

  2. #2
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    You have me thinkin now. I have always cut my own meat and have always boned it out. Mainly because I didnt like the taste of deer or antelope fat or bone marrow, but with moose and caribou it might be different. Might have to give it a try!
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

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  3. #3
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    Cory, Moose now, are eatin' more grasses than willows...with a bit o' birch thrown in...so the meat's pretty darned tasty! Either that, the aging process has really cut down on the willow taste of the moose...

    But boy what's I give for a Water Knife...

  4. #4

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    a saw never touches my meat...bone chips and marrow are an aquired taste and not suied to Michigan Whitetail (and they're corn-fed). bone it all, it will cut down on packaging and freezer space, not to mention, converting a bunny hugger or two to wildgame.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    not to mention, converting a bunny hugger or two to wildgame.
    Pugh, how can you stand the smell of gutting them??????

  6. #6
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    Is there a significant time savings when you cut the T-bones and stuff over boning it all out?
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  7. #7

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    space saved in your freezer just from the lack of bones is minimal to say the least, ive processed both ways, most people will process meat the way they were shown by either a buddy or a family member i learned from my dad using hand meat saw & a hand crank grinder then i worked in a local deer processing station & wow the efficency & time saveing tips i learned were well worth it, i now own a meat cutting bandsaw,electric grinder ,crank mixer for blending seasonings w/burger, freezer paper stand for easy wrapping, a scale for weighing burger packgs, burger bags etc...etc... if i were to pay a processor to handle my game the money paid to him would more than pay for all the equipment that i have, i also make my own jerkey & snack sticks with a dehydrator & smoker, ive constantly got guys at work asking me when im gonna make some more jerkey or snack sticks. you'll feel very prideful knowing that you saved $$$ & that your self reliant with such a useful skill learned only problem i have is all my buddies ask to bring their deer & elk meat over for me to process for them, pretty cool when you spoke highly of when it comes to processing game for the table.

  8. #8
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Moose T-bones rock. Once you have tried them you will never de-bone the backstap and tenderloins again.
    If you have a bandsaw, partially freeze the ribs (do not cut off any meat while butchering the animal), and cut them into flanken ribs. Marinate in terriyaki and BBQ on high. Gret stuff!!
    Also, save the large leg bones, cut them into 4" long chunks and add one to your moose stew next time. Let simmer and knock out the marrow into the stew. Really thickens it up and adds flavor.
    BK
    Last edited by bkmail; 10-11-2010 at 13:29. Reason: sp error

  9. #9
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    +1 bkmail, but I NEVER marinate my moose...but hey, whatever flavor you add, tis you...

  10. #10
    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    You havent had moose until you have had our standing moose prime rib.....yes, cut with a sawzall
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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