Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Thread: Don't Shoot a Moose This Far From The Road

  1. #1

    Smile Don't Shoot a Moose This Far From The Road

    Went on a solo hunt the first day of rifle season, thinking I was pretty much just taking my gun for a walk. However, I spotted a couple legal, if small, bulls and knocked down a forked horn a couple hours after dawn.

    Good for me. Only bad news is that I was 2+ miles from my truck.

    So to tally it up, this moose season I spent less than 2 hours hunting and about 16 hours processing and packing meat! I figure I hiked about 25 miles total, half of that with a big chunk of meat on my back.

    Never been that tired in my life, but I got all the meat out and will have a full freezer this winter.

    I'm a big guy, and I can pack some weight, but I will be eternally greatful that this was a pretty small moose in the grand scheme of things and not some 1600lb bruiser. I'm fairly proud of myself, but for all the newbie moose hunters: do yourself a favor and listen when people tell you not to drop one too far from transportation. Or at least bring along a few friends!

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Well done, sir - both with the sage advice and with doing what it took to get that meat out of the woods and taken care of. I've packed caribou 10+ miles solo, but have yet to pack a moose more than a few hundred yards. I might do something foolish later this fall, though. I've got a spot that holds a number of unpressured moose that I might hunt late in the season, but the kicker is that it is 3 miles from the nearest road in a non-motorized area. The trail is hard, though, so I figure 3 miles of trail is about the same as 1 mile of muskeg. Tempting...

  3. #3
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Congrats Yanbu, and good advice learned the hard way , btw, 2 miles would be considered a "reasonable" distance by alot of folks to pack a moose...in good terrain anyway..

    Brian, I look at it a little differently....1 mile of swamp packing = 3 miles of hard ground (relative to knee pain)..IOW, swamp packing is more of a workout, but hard ground is really hard on the knees and back.. to each his own misery...

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks all.

    dkwarthog: Well, pushing the edge of reasonable maybe. I'll think twice next time if I'm by myself, thats for sure. Not to mention being a little paranoid about Mr. Grizz the whole time I was quartering it.

  5. #5
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Congrats on a successful hunt and good job taking care of it on your own!!

  6. #6
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Yea, if you have an imagination like mine, you were envisioning yourself as a piece of raw meat with legs to a bears eyes...like the old bugs bunny cartoons, lol

    Congrats again.. everything becomes less "reasonable" when your doing it solo!!

  7. #7
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    The trail is hard, though, so I figure 3 miles of trail is about the same as 1 mile of muskeg. Tempting...
    keep tellin' yerself that....

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    keep tellin' yerself that....
    Well, since you and your brother are going to be my sherpas, I figure it won't be too bad. Just keep checking your e-mail for a SPOT "help" message in late September. Bring your pack.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,639

    Default

    Oh ya, you did very good, and worked for that meat.

    Often, I move the camp to the kill.
    This allows me to take my time and hang, freeze or dry up the meat and hides so I can keep on hunting, without any spoilage.

    Then I make my loads to the boat or home, whichever.... Its alot easier that way, for me.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  10. #10
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Well done, sir - both with the sage advice and with doing what it took to get that meat out of the woods and taken care of. I've packed caribou 10+ miles solo, but have yet to pack a moose more than a few hundred yards. I might do something foolish later this fall, though. I've got a spot that holds a number of unpressured moose that I might hunt late in the season, but the kicker is that it is 3 miles from the nearest road in a non-motorized area. The trail is hard, though, so I figure 3 miles of trail is about the same as 1 mile of muskeg. Tempting...

    Don't you have a Mtn. bike with a trailer? Is the trail not rideable? I have a 29er with a bob and willing to pack, even if on foot. Given I am not in Eklutna still chasing my sheep. SPOT me too, the more the marrier and I keep secrets and obey!

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Often, I move the camp to the kill.
    This allows me to take my time and hang, freeze or dry up the meat and hides so I can keep on hunting, without any spoilage.
    Stranger,
    With a family of your size, seems to me it would be easier to just move the kin. Shoot they could eat a forkhorn at one setting.

    OP,
    Good job.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  12. #12
    Member Bearclaw67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    329

    Default

    I'll give ya a hand Brian.
    Paul

  13. #13
    Member akhunter3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    824

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    Stranger,
    With a family of your size, seems to me it would be easier to just move the kin. Shoot they could eat a forkhorn at one setting.

    OP,
    Good job.






    Jon
    Nurse by night, Alaska adventurer by day!

  14. #14
    Member jeff p's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    375

    Default

    Nice job on a solo moose. I have told myself the same thing many times; however, as time passes I seem to forget the pain while just remembering how much I enjoyed everything else. It is a vicious cycle.

    We also need some pics!

  15. #15
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Well, since you and your brother are going to be my sherpas, I figure it won't be too bad. Just keep checking your e-mail for a SPOT "help" message in late September. Bring your pack.
    Will do......

  16. #16
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Congrats. It's amazing how big a moose can get after its shot!
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  17. #17

    Default

    I think a very good rule of thumb is one mile per packer and even that is quite a haul!

  18. #18
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JAKEAK49 View Post
    I think a very good rule of thumb is one mile per packer and even that is quite a haul!


    You cannot shoot a moose too close to the truck, atv, or skiff IMO!
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  19. #19
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Marshall
    Posts
    1,975

    Default

    I'm with SIS on this one...I asked my first huntin' partner "I wonder how the ancients used to do it?" & he didn't know...then I remembered that the Ancients weren't static dwellers as they are today, but nomadic, where they shot the kill, the set up camp & ate...

    +1 SIS if I could...

  20. #20
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Takes several years to learn where to drop a moose.
    With a year in-between each kill, we forget the amount of work involved.
    After:
    10 years, stop hunting swampy muskeg areas.
    15 years, only hunt up hill.
    20 years, access to 4-wheeler or call them in close to camp.
    25 years, bring young guys & brag on them how much weight they can carry.

    30 years, be camp cook, only shoot in camp, let the young guys leave camp, if you can't drive to it, hand the young guys a skillet & salt shaker, & tell him to "eat it where it is" (wisdom) LOL

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •