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Thread: Can you carry 100 lb's?

  1. #1
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    Default Can you carry 100 lb's?

    We are about ready to hunt the Yukon and will be in and around Tanana. The RM834 area regs state you have to keep the meat on the bone. Not too much of a problem if the moose is not too big. But say, you shoot a big boy and have to pack a 100 pound (or more) quarter out. I don't think I can do that for very long, and there are several people in my party that I know can not. So, is there a way to lighten the quarter but still meet the regulation requirements?

    Some ideas we have are:

    Shoot small moose
    Shoot moose in camp or right next to the boat.
    Bring a sled to drag quarters if we can not carry them.
    Shoot moose upstream of Tanana
    Use good frame packs
    Buy new discs for our backs before we go.

    Any other tricks I may be missing? It seems unreasonable to require every hunter that can take a moose in this area to carry a VERY heavy load. A moderate load, say 60 pounds, is much more reasonable and safe for more of the mainstream hunters in my opinion. If we have to carry very heavy loads, it will decrease the distance we can get off the river drastically. We try not to get more than a mile away at the maximum anyway.

  2. #2
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Barney's pack frame. I never quarter a moose, more like 6-8 pieces. Cut off legs, ribs and cut back bone in half. Leave the hooves out there, I am sure you would've. Heaviest part should be the hind legs. A sled works too. Cut legs in half if need be, still on the bone.

  3. #3
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    I probably wouldn't like the answer I'm giving you if I had asked the question, but.....if the potential physical burdens of a given hunt are too much for you, you shouldn't do the hunt. Find one you can handle. I don't mean to sound like a jerk, but that really is the bottom line.

    How much moose hunting have you done? I have never boned out a moose. The loads can be heavy, but they're manageable. Put each quarter in a bag. Rib racks can both go in one bag or bag them separately if you want. I put the backstraps, tenderloins, neck meat, and everything else in the last bag. That is the heavy one. You could just as easily split it up and lighten the load. You're going to have to make multiple trips, regardless, so just take enough game bags to make each load light enough.

    If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.
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  4. #4

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    GRRRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Does this pee me off, yes. To answer the question. Yes I can pack 100# and I am 64 years old. If you can't pack it, don't shoot it.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    The secert to 100# packs is take your time.Start takeing a break before you need one. If the ground is good two quarters on a pole between two men fells lighter than a quarter per man
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    uh, yeah, i can carry #100, but as louise commented... "sure, but it would hurt!!!"
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  7. #7
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    I agree with walk-in. If the folks you're going with can't handle it then don't do it. I love packing moose meat at over 100 pounds a pack. That's why I go. FWIW, I weigh in at 160 more or less and my heaviest load was a 10'4" soaking wet brown bear hide that weighed 204 pounds (weighed on a freight scale in Cold Bay the day after my 50th birthday). Suck it up or stay home.
    I type too slow, and agree with the old guy AGL4 now too!
    Last edited by Alasken; 08-24-2010 at 22:38. Reason: too slow
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  8. #8

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    Cut a thick branch. Tie a quarter to the branch.. you grab one end.. buddy grabs the other and make an extra trip or two.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    We are about ready to hunt the Yukon and will be in and around Tanana. The RM834 area regs state you have to keep the meat on the bone. Not too much of a problem if the moose is not too big. But say, you shoot a big boy and have to pack a 100 pound (or more) quarter out. I don't think I can do that for very long, and there are several people in my party that I know can not. So, is there a way to lighten the quarter but still meet the regulation requirements?

    Some ideas we have are:

    Shoot small moose
    Shoot moose in camp or right next to the boat.
    Bring a sled to drag quarters if we can not carry them.
    Shoot moose upstream of Tanana
    Use good frame packs
    Buy new discs for our backs before we go.

    Any other tricks I may be missing? It seems unreasonable to require every hunter that can take a moose in this area to carry a VERY heavy load. A moderate load, say 60 pounds, is much more reasonable and safe for more of the mainstream hunters in my opinion. If we have to carry very heavy loads, it will decrease the distance we can get off the river drastically. We try not to get more than a mile away at the maximum anyway.
    Probably has a lot more to do with knowing how to distribute the weight on the pack frame - high vs low or in between; quality of pack frame, design and construction - a lot of junk when it comes to heavy loads; and terrain as physical ability.
    Joe (Ak)

  10. #10
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    take a saw and cut the quarter in half there is nothing in the regs that says that a quarter has to stay in one piece all it says is that you can not bone it out in the field it will take a few more trips but it will lighten the load and make it more manageable. Personally I dont like to pack very many trips back and forth so I take as much as I can at one time to make it in as few trips as I can

  11. #11
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I have heard of a guy hunting by himself, shot a big moose and could not lift his pack with a hind quarter on it high enough to get it on his back. He had a small tarp with him and he just drug it out. Not always an option obviously, depending on the terrain, but an option. I am with these other guys, if it is too heavy, saw the quarters in half, or what ever you have to do to make the load light enough. Or, go blacktail hunting, put the whole deer in your pack and it is lighter than a hind quarter from a moose

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have stuffed a whole goat in my pack (boned out) and it was a lot more than 100lbs. Getting a good pack that lets you distribute the weight properly is one big key. I also would never try it without trekking poles. I am 30 now and played competitive hockey for most of the first 20 years of my life and done plenty of hiking and running the last 10 so the fact that I have no knee problems and an over 6'5" is a blessing. I take very good care of them!! I will not haul heavy loads without trekking poles!!

    A landmark study published by Dr. G. Neureuther in 1981 proved that use of "ski poles" while walking reduces the pressure strain on the opposite leg by approximately 20%. Furthermore, while walking on level ground, poles reduce the body weight carried by the legs by approximately 5 kg every step. Move to an incline, and that reduction increases to 8 kg. This translates into tons of weight -- yes, tons -- for even a two hour hike.

  13. #13
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    Default Work Smarter, Not Harder

    We have used a collapsible cot for years. 2, 3, or 4 guys can all work together to move a moose quarter a long way. It's probably tougher on the guys in back because they can't see what they are tripping on as well. Longest haul with big moose has been pretty close to a mile.
    We also use a single axle cart called a mule. It works pretty well over a variety of terrain, as long as it is not tussocks. You can stop and rest without bending over to set the load down and pick it up.
    Biggest load I've had on a pack were the rear quarters on a 65" bull I shot. They weighed in at 172lbs and 176lbs after hanging for 4 days. I was lucky not to have to carry them far. I could have made them lighter if I'd have cut the pelvis off at the hip/ball joint. At the time I weighed about 160lbs.
    I agree with Lujon, trekking poles or sticks of some sort really do help. Even old x-country fiberglass ski poles work really well and you can find them for about $2 at Used a Bit type stores, Value Village, or garage sales.

  14. #14
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    I can easily drag a Headless Bull Caribou across Tundra with a long rope and a plastic tarp, no carrying involved. Twice as easy with two people, and easier yet again if it has recently rain'd.

    When I do carry loads across the Tundra, I always carry a walking stik. Keeps me from falling, tests the ground (swampy) and I can lean against it to rest insted of sitting down.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    If I shot it......I can carry it, period.

    I hauled a 100 pound load down a 3,500 peak over 4 miles, stuffed it in my kayak and paddled it 3.5 miles down a lake on Sunday. That was just a day hunt.

    The answer to you question is yes.

    I started training December of 2009 for the 2010 hunting season.

  16. #16
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    Yea but I don't like it. I used trekking poles and last time I went moose hunting, the sled idea worked well and saved my already damaged back. The times I do moose hunt, I have a plan to get the meat out long before I pull the trigger.

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    Daved, looks like you TRYING to be as perpared for a hunt as you can. Don't let some here get under your skin. I wonder how many have REALLY packed out a fulll mature moose rear quarter very far. As for 100#'s? Your going to wish your rear quarter was only 100#'s. A comfortable STRONG pack will help TONS. And like said, take the time to learn how to load it correctly. Like Stranger said, a walking stick and a cheap kiddy sled will be worth there weight in gold. Nothing helps you get up off the tundra with an over loaded pack then a stick....or a hunting partener. Good luck and I hope you do well!!

  18. #18

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    You can do it. It isn't the funnest thing in the world, but you can do it. Last moose I packed on my back was a 3 1/2 mile jaunt solo. Took three days to get it done and at the end, I said I would do it again. It was a big bodied 63" bull!

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    I agree with most here. If you don't have a plan, don't do it. That is why this forum is such a gold mine. The trekking poles and different ways to drag the quarters are great ideas. Cutting the quarter in half sounds reasonable. Getting in shape is a must, but some just can't. No matter how hard they work, genetics and life events will not let them carry very heavy loads. Like my wife. She is very physically fit (can you say crow pass crossing and mount marathon?) but she can still not carry a moose quarter and never will. Should she be excluded from hunting? Can only very tough strong men be allowed to hunt when all you really need is more time and ingenuity?

    Thanks AK River Rat: work smarter not harder.

    I am interested in what other folks have used to drag moose out. A tarp sounds good, kiddie sled has been mentioned, poles and cots. Any other invention that has been missed?

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by trailblazersteve View Post
    I wonder how many have REALLY packed out a fulll mature moose rear quarter very far.!!
    From the vary back of Peters Creek, just past Billicous Mountain, roughly 8 or 9 miles.

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