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Thread: Diesel and Gas treatments

  1. #1
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default Diesel and Gas treatments

    My main engine is the Volvo KAD32P ~ 2003 boat with only 250 hours on it. Prior to this last weekend I added some diesel fuel treatment that I picked up from West Marine, can't think of the name right now. Other than the stabil type of stuff for the off season, this was the first treatment i've done. I was amazed at what it did, added 3 more knots to the top end added to the GPH consumption. Questions ~ how often should this type of treatment be done and second what should I be running through my Yamaha 9.9 kicker?
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    I'm not sure about your marine diesel, but for my F250 diesel truck, I add an anti-gelling additive in the winter.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Sea Foam. One of the few fuel additives that actually does what it says it will. You can add it to the fuel or the crank case oil or both. Good stuff.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I have heard that Yamaha Ring Free is a good product, but I have not tried it yet.
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    Power Service is an excelllent diesel fuel additive as well. As for the Yamaha, guessing it is a 4 stroke carb ? Some isoproplyl is all I would add to its' fuel supply .

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Sea Foam. One of the few fuel additives that actually does what it says it will. You can add it to the fuel or the crank case oil or both. Good stuff.
    Agreed. If picked up at a Marine Outlet, no doubt that was what it was. Excellent for all applications, gas, diesel, two or four stroke.
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    Stanadyne. I have a friend who has a rather large boat with diesel engines who has been in boating for a long time and I trust his judgement. He adds Stanadyne every time he adds fuel. Has anti-gel properties, but should be used year round. And you don't have to get it at WM and pay an arm and a leg for it.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Stanadyne. I have a friend who has a rather large boat with diesel engines who has been in boating for a long time and I trust his judgement. He adds Stanadyne every time he adds fuel. Has anti-gel properties, but should be used year round. And you don't have to get it at WM and pay an arm and a leg for it.
    For the diesel, I agree. But for his kicker, I would go with Sea Foam. If one only wanted to keep on hand and use one product for both applications, Sea Foam would be my choice.
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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    I never did any research but are you getting low or ultra low sulfer at the Port. If you are having use lower sulfer fuel you may want to consider using a good synthetic 2 stroke oil or Marvel Mystery oil added to the fuel, NOT ATF or motor oil.

    I have been doing it for quite a few years on my road vehicles (2 stroke) and have a bunch of members here also doing it with great results in engine performance/economy.

    One word of caution, never use any type of alcohol based additive in a diesel (you could hurt your injectors) and you should really try to avoid using it in marine applications or during long term storage as it will absorb moisture from the air because marine fuel tanks are vented to the atmosphere. Last thing is watch your mixture of additives. For those of us middle aged guys we can remember Dad guessing at the proper amount of oil to add to the fuel tank and after a couple of tanks to find he was running real oil rich.

    On edit: If you are not using an Amsoil product then Sea Foam would be my product of choice.

  10. #10
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    So the stuff I used was BioborMD. Picked it up at West Marine in Anchorage. It sure seemed to work for me.
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    For the diesel, I agree. But for his kicker, I would go with Sea Foam. If one only wanted to keep on hand and use one product for both applications, Sea Foam would be my choice.
    Woops. I should have said not for the kicker.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Some of you use power service ALL winter long in your trucks? Doesn't the pump mix work good enough to keep it from freezing? I have a few quarts of PS - but didn't plan on using it all of the time.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Some of you use power service ALL winter long in your trucks? Doesn't the pump mix work good enough to keep it from freezing? I have a few quarts of PS - but didn't plan on using it all of the time.
    In my truck I use a product put out by Ford. Ford told me to only use it, and not over the counter stuff. Who knows if that is true??? But, on a new truck I don't want to risk it. Apparently the Ford anti-gelling additive doesn't have the alcohol, which can hurt your motor. I just started using it at the end of last winter, but plan on using it all winter long this year.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have an old 92 dodge - that I recently inherited. Brought it up from the lower 48 this summer....don't care to deal with gelling if I don't have to....especially if I am snomachining- hate to get back to the truck to find it won't start when I am already cold!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruger01 View Post
    In my truck I use a product put out by Ford. Ford told me to only use it, and not over the counter stuff. Who knows if that is true??? But, on a new truck I don't want to risk it. Apparently the Ford anti-gelling additive doesn't have the alcohol, which can hurt your motor. I just started using it at the end of last winter, but plan on using it all winter long this year.
    I had a local Ford dealer tell me to use Stanadyne (for my diesel), which is over-the-counter stuff. That's been about 10 years ago so maybe Ford has something better now. Bought my '99 F-250 in 2000 with 90,000 on it and still going strong (knock on wood) at about 239,000. But if the Ford stuff is similar in price to Stanadyne, or even a little more, then for peace of mind I would consider using it especially considering how much a new diesel truck costs these days.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    I had a local Ford dealer tell me to use Stanadyne (for my diesel), which is over-the-counter stuff. That's been about 10 years ago so maybe Ford has something better now. Bought my '99 F-250 in 2000 with 90,000 on it and still going strong (knock on wood) at about 239,000. But if the Ford stuff is similar in price to Stanadyne, or even a little more, then for peace of mind I would consider using it especially considering how much a new diesel truck costs these days.
    My 250 is a 2008. They told me that it is newer motor and technology, and requires the Ford stuff. Never can believe them, but not worth the risk.

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