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Thread: The best caliber for hunt on a grizzly and polar bear?

  1. #1

    Default The best caliber for hunt on a grizzly and polar bear?

    Hi friends.
    I am interested by a question-the best caliber and reliable rifle for hunt on a grizzly and polar bear.
    Place of hunt Kolyma is Magadan, Chukotka and Oymyakon- Yakutiya,temperature condition from
    +50C to -70C(max.).
    Thank you for a help and answers.

  2. #2
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    7.62X54R
    I found that the Finnish M-39 version of the Mosin Nagant is THE most reliable as well as accurate bolt action rifle I could have, and I have had plenty.
    It's what I use on my excursions out the door.

    I previously used "The Best" as in a Milsurp U.S. M-1917, but 30-06 shells cost 4X the 7.62X54R, and I can more easily obtain the Czeck made stuff, Seilor&Bellot factory.
    Great accuracy as well as tumbling through the animal, its a deep digger and campatable power wize with the 30-06.

    Getting that should be NO problem where you live.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    7.62X54R
    I found that the Finnish M-39 version of the Mosin Nagant is THE most reliable as well as accurate bolt action rifle I could have, and I have had plenty.
    It's what I use on my excursions out the door.

    I previously used "The Best" as in a Milsurp U.S. M-1917, but 30-06 shells cost 4X the 7.62X54R, and I can more easily obtain the Czeck made stuff, Seilor&Bellot factory.
    Great accuracy as well as tumbling through the animal, its a deep digger and campatable power wize with the 30-06.

    Getting that should be NO problem where you live.
    OK.
    If to talk and calibers 7.62X54R and 30-06 - it is necessary to specify a cartridge and bullet for the use,-I think that minimum weight for 30-06 can be 180 grain and for 7.62X54R 200 grain.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    What calibers do you have available to you in your gun safe? For me, I'd take my .338, since that's what I have available.

    Tim

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    What calibers do you have available to you in your gun safe? For me, I'd take my .338, since that's what I have available.

    Tim
    It seems to me 9.3x62 or .375H&H more correspond this hunt.

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    How old are you, Kristian?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian55 View Post
    Hi friends.
    I am interested by a question-the best caliber and reliable rifle for hunt on a grizzly and polar bear.
    Place of hunt Kolyma is Magadan, Chukotka and Oymyakon- Yakutiya,temperature condition from
    +50C to -70C(max.).
    Thank you for a help and answers.
    I'd recommed a .375 H&H. A big gun that can put down a big bear in a heartbeat if need be. Not a super hard recoiling rifle and with a bit of practice you'll become very proficient with it.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    +50C to -70C(max.). is 122F to -94F - dang, that's a pretty big temperature spread. Better watch what you lubricate the rifle with. Some will freeze at -94F. That's going to affect your bullet point of impact as well.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian55 View Post
    conditions from
    +50C to -70C(max.).
    Uh, 50C = 122F. Don't know too may bears that live in, or can hack that kind of weather.

    -70C = -94 F. Don't know too many humans who go out hunting in those temps and live to tell about it.

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    For Polar Bear, or comparable brown (Kodiak) bears, I wouldn't have faith in anything less than a 375 H&H. A 416 would be preferable in my opinion. Whatever gun you get for it, have it winterized for extreme cold. Expect to pay almost as much as your gun to have it done right.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    How old are you, Kristian?
    Hi.
    You can look my NIK.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    Uh, 50C = 122F. Don't know too may bears that live in, or can hack that kind of weather.

    -70C = -94 F. Don't know too many humans who go out hunting in those temps and live to tell about it.
    OK.
    Speech does not go, that firing will be made at a temperature -70C.
    Speech goes, that exploitation of rifle is possible in these terms .
    Optimum winter hunt at temperature - 30C - 40C already is extreme+wind.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    For Polar Bear, or comparable brown (Kodiak) bears, I wouldn't have faith in anything less than a 375 H&H. A 416 would be preferable in my opinion. Whatever gun you get for it, have it winterized for extreme cold. Expect to pay almost as much as your gun to have it done right.
    I shot wild wild boars and brown bears by the caliber of SKS 7.62x39, little distance it is a risk always, bears were weighing to 200kg. maximum and distance no more than 30m.-50 m.-70m..

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Kristian - No offense, but 7.62x39 or even 7.62x54 is NOT a good caliber to shoot at world class sized bears like that. Just think of how many soldiers have walked away from 7.62x39 wounds.
    Also, many bear CUBS up here can weigh 200 kg. Polar bears can weigh 2000 pounds (world record was 2,210 pounds) and Kodiak and coastal bears regularly approach 1600 pounds. Using a gun that fails to kill 180 pound insurgents is a BAD idea.

    Consider that Polar bears have a typical bear hide, plus up to 4 inches of blubber. Also, you can expect to take shots up to 300 yards at them, because of how agressive and dangerous they are. You need something that will arrive with serious authority at 300 yards, like a 300 grain bullet.

    Also you need a gun that is super reliable in the cold and wind. I have heard nightmares about firing pins breaking when they strike their first shot in -20 or below hunting. You'll need to swap out certain parts with different alloys that wont malfunction in the cold. You're looking at some serious gun-work to be ready for polar bear.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    Kristian - No offense, but 7.62x39 or even 7.62x54 is NOT a good caliber to shoot at world class sized bears like that. Just think of how many soldiers have walked away from 7.62x39 wounds.
    Also, many bear CUBS up here can weigh 200 kg. Polar bears can weigh 2000 pounds (world record was 2,210 pounds) and Kodiak and coastal bears regularly approach 1600 pounds. Using a gun that fails to kill 180 pound insurgents is a BAD idea.

    Consider that Polar bears have a typical bear hide, plus up to 4 inches of blubber. Also, you can expect to take shots up to 300 yards at them, because of how agressive and dangerous they are. You need something that will arrive with serious authority at 300 yards, like a 300 grain bullet.

    Also you need a gun that is super reliable in the cold and wind. I have heard nightmares about firing pins breaking when they strike their first shot in -20 or below hunting. You'll need to swap out certain parts with different alloys that wont malfunction in the cold. You're looking at some serious gun-work to be ready for polar bear.
    For a lot of these reasons, Boddington wrote that he feels the ideal Polar Bear cartridges are the .375 RUM and Wby and the .378 Wby (or any other fast .375 cal rifle, with a bit more range than the H&H).

    I likely will never get to hunt Polar Bear, but would also think, if one could handle it, a .416 Wby firing a 350gr TSX at 2,900 fps would be pretty flat-shooting and hard-hitting-at-long-range round.

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    My .416 Taylor M77 would do the job. I'd have to put another $1000 into cold weather coated titanium parts inside. Any one know of a gunsmith who does work like that? I've heard from quite a few people who have had cold weather trouble when musk-ox or bison hunting when the weather drops out.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member Redlander's Avatar
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    Default .375 h&h

    If I were to even go on a grizzly (possible) or polar (LOL - not ever at my income level) bear I'd take my .375 H&H Win Model 70 Stainless Classic, pre FN, with it's McMillan stock, degrease it, add some graphite where needed (if going to be in polar areas), and load it with 300 Swift A-frames (Remington factory loads). I would not try a shot over 300 yards, probably not over 200, and I'd rather be within 100.

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    I cant conjecture what "Might" Or "Should work" Im telling you what I have and will contenue to use, so this is just my Opinion formed from use and observation.
    I actually get out and use my MosinNagant, as do a great many of your Chuk-Chi, Evenki and Sibersk Yupik' country men, in -40 and in all weather, Kristian.

    Sergi Mosin created what might be the best Cold weather rifle, ever.
    Nothing breaks on them.

    Its all about proper shot placement.
    The Mosin is up to it, I know from experiance.
    I use 148 Full Metal Jackets with steel cores. They have awsome penatratinon and the steel core remains solid through bones and such.
    I have shot many a Brown Bear, as well, so now has the wife.
    My oldest son has 3 Polar Bear , and a few Brown to date, using a Mosin, no problem.
    My Bro inlaw does his thang with Mosin's on Bears as well, no problemo.

    The 9.3 you have will do very well, as will any that are suggested. Use what you can hit with, and that you know works very well.
    The trick is getting it shot inthe proper place.
    Even an SKS can do it, as you note.
    The Mosin is very well known Cold Weather rifle, no expensive mods needed to make it work like it should.

    Kolyma is know for its deep COLD as well as Polar Bears.

    Then , again, the last Poler Bear, a decent 9 foot'r, that was shot in This Village was two years ago, was dropped by a local kid, with one shot with his .243w using 100 grain Coleloks.
    I think he must have shot it properly..........

    Use what you got and can hit with. The rest is variable..........

    Good luck on the Polar Bears.
    Now that the world has figured out that the ice really IS melting and temps are rising, Russia and the US have decided to limit each years Polar Bear Harvest to 58 Total Beras between BOTH Countrys. Thats hunted, self defence, ect. all forms of getting killed.........
    Kotzebue Sound used to be "The Place" for Hunting Polar Bears, and its where the world record came from, unfortuanatly, the ice isnt thick enought to support their prey, and have moved north to the thick ice and the Mammles that rely on it.

    Regardless, Good luck!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  19. #19
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    Kristian, could you tell us what kind of rifle, as in make, scope, factory, and the types of ammunition available to you?

    I use what I have, I do not have large caliber rifles.
    I often carry two rifles, one being a .22lr.


    Who made your 9.3? what kind of loads?
    What else do you hunt?

    (wait, I do own a .42 Berdan Carbine, but I dont shoot Bears with it~~LOL!!~~)
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    Kristian - No offense, but 7.62x39 or even 7.62x54 is NOT a good caliber to shoot at world class sized bears like that. Just think of how many soldiers have walked away from 7.62x39 wounds.
    Also, many bear CUBS up here can weigh 200 kg. Polar bears can weigh 2000 pounds (world record was 2,210 pounds) and Kodiak and coastal bears regularly approach 1600 pounds. Using a gun that fails to kill 180 pound insurgents is a BAD idea.

    Consider that Polar bears have a typical bear hide, plus up to 4 inches of blubber. Also, you can expect to take shots up to 300 yards at them, because of how agressive and dangerous they are. You need something that will arrive with serious authority at 300 yards, like a 300 grain bullet.

    Also you need a gun that is super reliable in the cold and wind. I have heard nightmares about firing pins breaking when they strike their first shot in -20 or below hunting. You'll need to swap out certain parts with different alloys that wont malfunction in the cold. You're looking at some serious gun-work to be ready for polar bear.
    Hi.
    The rifles of what company in the USA can conform to these requirements of reliability: Rem.,Savage,Win.,Kimber, Ruger,CZ, Zastava, Weatherby?

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