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Thread: Things that new residents should be aware of.

  1. #1

    Default Things that new residents should be aware of.

    Hi,

    I read the post below about booties and vest and got some good information. I am expecting a new pup next month and want to make sure I treat her right, so I wanted to ask what concerns a person needs to be aware of to keep our dogs safe in winter conditions. A lot of it may seem common sense to people who have been up here a while, but never living in cold weather before, I may not be aware of what the experts consider common sense concerns. I would rather come off as ignorant than harm my pup by not asking.

    Thanks.

    Robert

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

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    I think the biggest thing I learned being up here (6 years today!) is keeping the dog contained when not supervised. So many people in Alaska think its a right of Alaskan residency to let the dog out the door. Just as dangerous if you live in an urban area dogs are injured and killed regularly by vehicles, wildlife, traps and eating something poisonous. Depending on where you are the municipality has some loose dog rules. Things can happen even with the best precautions. Get your dog ID chipped and registered at the borough. There are a number of groups networked to help find lost dogs and owners. Between Willow Dog Mushers, the Mat-Su borough and Alaska Dog News Facebook page, lost and found dogs are reunited at a very high percentage. An ID chip with collar ID is the fastest way to get your dog home. It's also important if there is a disaster and you are separated from your dog.
    Unique to Alaska is the cold and depending on your dogs physique cold will affect them differently. Personally, my Lab does not stay out long below 20F even with a nice kennel set up. Though she has always seemed fine when left for a few hours at 5F. Coats can't hurt, booties dont stay on long but the combination of both may extend your time out. Lucy got extremely cold last November in a pond after she was wet for about hour. One last search for a duck that dived under an overhang ended hunting for a few hours. She had neoprene on but it was not enough for that long in cold water ... for her. In other cases weve grouse hunted on a sunny 0-F degree day and she was almost over heated in the powder snow, the sun really warmed up the black Lab and us while our feet were freezing.
    Our dogs are indoors more up here than in the lower 48. Other than that we have advantages of no fleas, no ticks and no salmon poisoning.
    Check out http://www.alaskadognews.com for club listings and events you might be interested in.

  3. #3

    Default

    Linda,

    Thank you for the information. I will be looking in to some of the clubs in the Eagle River area, she is going to be an indoor pal/hunting buddy, so manners, social skills will be more important to me than the the hunting skills.

    Thanks again
    Robert

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default

    The clubs are listed in Alaska Dog News www.alaskadognews.com updated each month, and in print in various locations - Jitters cafe, Pet Zoo and Ravenwood Animal Hosptial and no on the Elmendorf YMCA if you're on base. Obedience Club Of Chugiak holds classes and is just north on the Old Glenn Hwy. Most of the training and tests happen South of Anchorage and in the Valley but people are spread out all over. Wetlands Retrievers trains in the Palmer Hay Flats about 20 min from ER.

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