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Thread: Hunting Alaska

  1. #1
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    Question Hunting Alaska

    HI There,


    Could somebody please give an estimate quote for 4 hunters, 7days, food &
    accomodation included.

    Could anyone perhaps recommend a spesific lodge ? We are planning to hunt & flyfish in Alaska in 2010.

    Lastly, with regards to weapons: Can we bring our own 30-06 calibers
    or are rifles supplied?

    Kind regards

    Braam Papenfus
    South Africa

  2. #2

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    You'll have to provde a bit more detail about the hunt you are looking for.

    What type of animals are you looking to hunt? Moose, caribou, bear, wolf, birds, or maybe some combination of types which would narrow down the available options.

    What areas are you hunting (Alaska is pretty big, so there can be huge differences in cost depending on where you want to go).

    As far as Alaska is concerned, there is no problem bringing your own rifle. I don't know of any place that rents them or provides them for other hunters, so you are definitely better off having your own. Personally, I would never borrow/rent someone else's rifle unless I had the time to try it out at the range first anyway.

  3. #3
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    And, you can buy 30-06 ammo at the grocery stores here (Fred Meyers)!!!

    Are you really planning to hunt here in 2010? Did you mean 2011?

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    If you are a non resident alien you will need to hire a guide.

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    anchskier :

    Thanks for the advice. I've got 16years experience hunting the African Bush & savannas but ZERO experience hunting anywhere else.
    I really don't even know what the right questions are to ask yet! Only just found out that if you want to go fly fishing you HAVE to have " Bear protection " aka shotgun / handgun !! Hehe

    So, just finished Sunday lunch now, I'm pretty stuffed and had a fair bit of red wine so if this post or the questions makes no sense whatsoever, please excuse me.

    1. I want to go fly-fishing for salmon.
    2. I want to hunt Moose, Caribo, Elk,Deer and MAYBE bear. God willing I'll be coming with my dad and 2 brothers. If we can each shoot any 1 of the animals mentioned that would be great.
    3. What area would you advise ? What season? Spring ? (what time of year is that ?). I'll be looking to go to the most affordable area that could offer the above, but if you can't get all of the above in 1 affordable area, I'd have to compromise.
    4. Is the 30-06 sufficient for the animals mentioned ?
    5. What are the roads like on average? Extrmely bumpy? Had an opperation done and consequently can't really take too much bumpy roads for too long peroids. My idea of hunting is you, your gun, enough water& food on foot.
    6. Sorry my mistake - I meant to say 2012 for the trip

    At this stage I'm just trying to find out what there is to offer .

    HAhaha! Yankee are you serious?! HAhah! Can you really buy 30-06 ammo at the grocery store?!

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Reasonable Moose and caribou could be done as a combo or Deer and Elk though honestly coming all that way to hunt deer and elk in AK seems pretty silly considering you can find more of both for lots cheaper in other areas of the United States (Colorado, Montana, Utah). Since you are going to have to hire a professional hunter (up here we call them guides) I would set your sights on a float hunt. If you time it right you should be able to get into good silver salmon fishing and have a good chance at either moose or caribou and possibly both.

    As the popular saying goes "If you can't kill it with a 30-06 you should hide! You will be fine for anything but the big coastal brown bears with the 30-06.

    I am not sure how the taxes and such would work out but you may be able to trade services with an AK guide that wants to hunt Africa.

    BTW, Not only can you buy ammo in grocery stores in AK but there are more than a few that also sell rifles and handguns.

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    LuJon, thanks for your reply.

    So my questions at this stage are (keeping prices in mind):

    1. Float hunt ? What does this entail?
    2. What part of Alaska do you guys suggest?
    3. What time of year ?
    4.What are the roads like on average? Extrmely bumpy? Had an opperation done and consequently can't really take too much bumpy roads for too long peroids. My idea of hunting is you, your gun, enough water& food on foot.
    5.Tough one: Buying a rifle there perhaps? What are the requirements for buying one and would I be able to export it back to SA ?
    6. Is there anyone out there who'd like to trade services like LuJon mentioned? Aka South African hunt / Alaska Hunt ?

    Glad to hear my old faithful 30-06 (that works for most any African animal) is still good for Alaskan game! Perhaps a 220grain for those moose & bears... Monolithic Solids perhaps ?

    Regards
    Braam

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    You should be aware that there are few areas here that are good hunting for multipale species at once, depending on what you are hunting. For example, moose you will find almost anywhere but there are restrictions on when or even if you can hunt, some places are resident only hunting. Trophy verse just haveing a good time will also vary depending on when/where, some areas you will have to apply online during december for tags to hunt, drawing permits. check out the alaska fwp site http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov for most of your questions. If I were you i would target only a few species, like sheep, caribou, bear or moose, bear, or even just one, other wise you may have to make multipale drops. moose,sheep hunting is generaly in september, while caribou, sheep start in august. as far as the elk, deer go, the best season for that is sept for elk, october for deer, but I would go down to Montana for those guys! bush services/outfitters only hunt a few areas and the many services are spead throughout the state. good luck planning you will need a year!

  9. #9
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    You can't hunt any big game here without a guide. Talk to the owner of this forum, Mike Strahan, about getting a good guide hired.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  10. #10
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    Talking to Mike Strahan is excellent advice! Plan on filling out the paperwork and bringing your own rifles, Alaska as a state is pretty unrestricted as far as firearms go but selling to non-res aliens falls under the Feds and they are much more restrictive. As said there are repetitively few areas of the state that offer great opportunities of multiple species, a float hunt allows you to cover more ground and get into varying habitat. One section of a river may be great for caribou then 20 miles later be in great moose habitat.

    It is possible to do the old fashioned backpack based hunting in AK. I do it for sheep, goats, black bear and even caribou however Moose are just too big to hunt very far from some sort of transportation. Your biggest challenge is going to be finding a guide that you are confident with that has a reputation for doing well on the type of hunt that you want. After that the key will be listening to them and getting prepared. With a guide it is very reasonable to expect that you never drive more than a few miles depending on where they are based out of. The highways up here are just like anyplace else, nice paved roads. I hunted Kodiak island for goats last year and it only took 2 plane rides and a 10 minute ride in a van to get between them and I was standing on a remote beach.

  11. #11
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    Lujon, thanks for your advice - really has answered quite a lot. I e-mailed Mike Strahan two days ago, but have not heard anything back yet. His e-mail still lostcreek@ak.net ? This float-hunt thing is starting to sound interesting...

  12. #12
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Hello Braam,

    Thanks for the note. Here are some things to consider:

    Because you are a nonresident alien, you are required by state law to secure the services of a registered hunting guide to hunt any big game species in Alaska. This can be quite expensive, with brown bear hunts running anywhere from $8500 USD to somewhere north of $17,000 USD. That is our most expensive hunt, with moose coming next in line and caribou somewhere near the bottom price-wise. Still, if price is an issue, a guided caribou hunt can be a wonderful experience if, for example, you hunt the Brooks Range where the scenery is beautiful and the fishing good. Depending on where you are in the Brooks, you may run into some chum salmon, but mostly the fishing will be for grayling and arctic char. Anyway, here are some direct answers to your questions...

    1) No problem on the fly-fishing. With most of our hunting seasons happening in the fall (essentially the month of September), the only species available to you then are coho (silver) and in some cases chum (dog) salmon. Most of them will be in spawning colors and inedible, however they can be caught on fly equipment. Some guide services offer this.

    2) On all multi-species hunts I recommend selecting one species as your primary interest and planning the entire hunt around that. This is very different from the way things are generally done in South Africa, however you must realize that Alaska has the lowest density of game animals per square mile of any state in the country. Simply put, there's a lot of habitat out there without a living animal on it for much of the year. Once you choose your primary species, you can list the others in order of preference and a recommendation can be made.

    3) The area selected is entirely dependent on your answer to #2 above. With the consultation service I offer, we always decide our species before we look at a specific location. The time of year depends on the species as well. Moose are generally hunted in September (our fall), caribou are hunted in August and September (though I don't recommend hunting them after the middle of September because the rut can render the meat inedible), Brown / grizzly bears and black bears are hunted in April / May (our spring season) and in August-October. As to elk, our herds are all imported and live mostly on the Kodiak / Afognak Islands. The terrain is very steep and brushy, and it rains a lot over there. Tags are awarded on a drawing basis. The hunt occurs in September / October if I remember correctly. Our deer are Sitka blacktails and are found in southeast Alaska and the Kodiak / Afognak archipelago. They are a diminutive species and most nonresidents hunt them as an incidental species while hunting brown bear (which inhabit the same areas).
    Your 30-06, with the proper loads, is adequate for any of these species, especially considering that your guide will back you up with a heavier caliber on brown bear.

    4) Forget about the roads. Most of the quality hunting in Alaska involves flying out to remote locations where the air strips are little more than a clearing on the ground or a gravel bar along a remote river. In other cases you will land on a river or a lake with a floatplane. From there, hunting is generally done on foot. Some outfits use ATVs (four-wheelers) to access the hunting area, some use rafts (in the case of float hunts) and even fewer use horses and pack animals. The road system in Alaska is quite limited. This, more than any other factor, is what makes an Alaska hunt one of the most expensive in the world. Most quality guided moose hunts, for example, sell for around $9,500. Some are as high as $17,000.

    If this all still seems good to you, drop me a line and I can begin helping you put something together. I operate a commercial consulting service and can coach you through the entire process if you like.

    Best regards,

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
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