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Thread: Ice fishing in the Interior?

  1. #1
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    Default Ice fishing in the Interior?

    As a new Alaskan fisherman, I am curious when the water usually freezes up in the Fairbanks area?

    Thanks!

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    Where's my dislike button????

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    If it's anything like Yellowknife (we're at the same lattitude) you should have some ice by Thanksgiving or there abouts.
    We're running around on our sleds a couple of weeks before Christmas most years, and finish in May.
    Plenty of ice fishing up here matey!!!

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Fished Birch lake through the ice 1 NOV one year, all depends on the weather. Getting out there early will find more fish.

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Oct 31 things are froze over but not good enough to trust. The end of Nov things are getting thicker. Buy Christmas you are good to go but with global warming who knows!
    Tim

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    Thanks for the tips! Any suggestions on what bait/fishing methods to use?

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    Live asian carp minnows should do the trick...

  8. #8
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    The fishing regs state that some lakes don't allow the use of bait. Where bait's allowed, herring, white fish, salmon roe (preferrably previously frozen and then if the roe's still too soft to stay on a hook you can place some in a mesh pouch made of any number of things, to include small pieces of nylon stockings), and many other baits; everything from sausages, chicken livers, corn, canned or fresh shrimp, etc. Baby squid is a real winner amongst many lake trout, and glow-in-the-dark lures with baby squid have cleaned house more than once or twice. A snowmachine headlight, or spot light, or flash from a camera can all be used to -regularly- charge the glow-in-the-dark lures.. And they need to be re-charged -regularly-.

    In the lakes in the Yukon Territory that are either inside of Kluane Nat'l Park, or other restricted areas that are often regarded by Canada's conservation dept. as what's known as 'quality waters,' the use of fish-related baits are often prohibited. In those waters everything from bacon, to chicken, to corn can be used. I've personally found that the use of small strips of bacon on one prong of a treble hook, with two chicken livers (one each on the other two prongs) makes for what looks like a swimming critter good enough for many giant grand-daddy lakers to eat, and puts off a scent trail that I've found -myself- following a time or two.. I mean, who can refuse bacon, right??

    Lakers (and other fish) can be seen at many depths if you have a fish viewer, but the most common technique that we successfully use is to jig slowly, with graceful 'swimming' motions, near the bottom (1-2 feet off the bottom, raising the lure/spoon/hook rig up and down, and returning it to that depth in each sequence of jigging.).

    We often fish lakers in mid to late March, on through the first week of April, and at depths of 100' to 190'. Obviously this is more descriptive of the waters we're fishing, as there are many laike trout lakes that don't have these depths, while others do.

    We typically use large spoons, heavy enough to sink easily. These spoons range in size from ~3", on up to the favorite Lucky Strike Canoe Wobblers, which go up to about 6-1/2" or 7", not counting the treble hook.

    Also, some lakes prohibit the use of barbs, so I have a large collection of big lures/spoons with no barbs on the hooks. Other lakes will prohibit the use of treble hooks, so replacement rings and single hooks occupy an area of the tackle box. If a specific lake prohibits one sort of tackle or another, don't even have the prohibited tackle in your box when fishing; it -can- ruin your day.

    Likewise, many Canadian lakes prohibit the use of -any- lead (whether in the lure or as sinkers) so many of the more common heavy-weight jigs are illegal in those locations.

    We've caught lakers in the 40"-44" range at some of these lakes, and nothing turns a fifty-something-year-old fisher-person into a giggling six-year-old any faster than hooking into such a critter on 50-lb. test-spider wire, and listening to that gigantic dinosaur-looking bugger run, stripping line off like a rodeo bull on a rope as it heads for the bottom, having seen the ice too soon.

    Good luck!

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