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Thread: Wild boar hunting

  1. #1

    Default Wild boar hunting

    I was at Brownells yesterday and ran into an old coot that I hadn't seen since he moved to Texas 30 years ago. The old guy is 71 years old, in great shape and spends all of his days catching catfish and hunting wild boar.

    He gave me an open invite to come shoot some "tuskers". He also advised me to bring a big gun with a high KO factor. The big boars are adapting so well that they are learning to circle their quarry and follow the hunter's sent trail from the back side making the hunter the hunted( they are carnivorous). Does that sound familiar to you Alaskans? He had a picture of one that his son killed this year that weighed 760lbs. Since a pig that big isn't fit to eat they took pictures and what not and then hauled it to a remote area and dumped it. Within a couple of days other pigs had completely devoured everything but the large bones.

    Sounds to me like they need some Brown Bears in Texas to help them out with their problem.

    I'm thinking a Marlin Guide gun in 45-70 should work for bringing home the bacon. Since I don't shoot the 45-70 very often I don't think I'll reload for it so what factory fodder would you guys recommend ? If it works on bruins it ortta work on a pig I would think.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    how come the big pigs are not fit to eat? used to have them on the farm 500-600 lbs after a few breeding years ... curious is all...
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  3. #3

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    EKC-

    Based on secondhand info (a good friend is a long time Tejano with pig problems on his place) any of the "hard cast" style loads should be fine. Lotsa lore mixed with differences in hunting, depending on terrain. My bud says for ambush hunting he really prefers his 260 Remington, but when he's coursing through the brush he's prone to his Marlin in 375 Winchester. He said the 45-70 would be fine if the guys that pack them onto his place could actually shoot the hot rounds they load them with. He calls hot loaded guide guns 45 Flinchesters.

    As for eating the big ones. They tend to get really tough and dry as size goes up. And with big boars in particular, the meat gets really musky. It's dandy for chili and spicy sausage, but you can only eat so much of that. Big sows are still dry and tough, but not musky. For chops, roasts and bacon pigs less than about 200 pounds are best, and 100 pounds is ideal. They've got so many pigs down there, they cull the big ones to limit the population while shooting the small ones for the table.

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    I'll glady fly down there and take my 450 Nitro Express double rifle and do my part to keep the population in check
    Tennessee

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    I'm thinking a Marlin Guide gun in 45-70 should work for bringing home the bacon. Since I don't shoot the 45-70 very often I don't think I'll reload for it so what factory fodder would you guys recommend ? If it works on bruins it ortta work on a pig I would think.
    The Hornady LeverEvolution 45/70 has done the job for me. It is loaded with a 325 grain bullet. Of course I have not run into any of those 700 pounders either. I have used the Winchester factory load of a 300 grain hollow point too. Almost any of the factory 45-70 ammo would be satisfactory for hogs in the deep South. You should be able to buy it at any gun store or Walmart.

    A lot of the plantation guys in Georgia use a 22-250 for a truck gun and drop everything from coyotes to feral hogs with them.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    how come the big pigs are not fit to eat? used to have them on the farm 500-600 lbs after a few breeding years ... curious is all...
    Vince, it's pretty much like BrownBear says.

    I grew up on a hog farm and we sent them to market to be butchered at around 250lbs. If they were much bigger you got docked on price per pound. Boar bacon sizzling in a skillet smells like boar on the hoof to most and that'd be me. My grandpa would eat it but then he'd eat the oppossum that he caught in the hen house too.

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    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
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    EKC, a buddy O mine down lousyanna way says the Garret hammerheads work well on them pigs.

  8. #8

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    While growing up in Louisiana in the 60's, i always used a ruger .44 mag. Carbine, as we hunted off horses-- Worked great. These days with so many pigs tearing up the farm i have gone to an AK-47 which works even better!! Guess my eyes are not as good as when i was 15, and a 20 shot clip seems to do better than a 4 round Magazine!!
    Goo

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    I thought boars were omnivorous...?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    I thought boars were omnivorous...?
    Pigs are, period. Sex doesn't matter.

    When we were kids our grandmother asked my brother and I to slaughter four roosters for a dinner. Company was coming. We whacked the head off the first one and were thrilled when it took of running. We were even more thrilled when it went through the rails into the pigpen and was attacked and eaten. Instantly. It was great fun to "aim" more roosters so their headless flight would take them into the pigpen. That is,,,,,, until our grandmother caught us feeding her roosters to the pigs!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Vince, it's pretty much like BrownBear says.

    I grew up on a hog farm and we sent them to market to be butchered at around 250lbs. If they were much bigger you got docked on price per pound. Boar bacon sizzling in a skillet smells like boar on the hoof to most and that'd be me. My grandpa would eat it but then he'd eat the oppossum that he caught in the hen house too.
    I've raised hogs all of my non-Alaskan life. Personally I will not mess with butchering a hog under 400 lbs, they just do not have enough maturity to have the best flavor IMO. Normally we raise hogs in pens of two and after 11-13 months we'll have a hog 550+ and a 450+ hog. We normally raise neutered males, but females are fine if you take care to not butcher them while they are in cycle. We used to keep a boar and a brood sow or two. The boars butcher fine if they are killed stone dead immediately and while an older hog may be somewhat tougher than a yearling, they have great flavor.

    My only experience with a pen raised boar that couldn't be eaten was with a man in our community that stayed about half drunk throughout the day and all drunk in the evening. He butchered a boar and shot it maybe 5-10 times before delivering the death blow, an inebriated marksman. I never tasted that hog, but I heard from several reliable people that it smelled so bad they could not stand the odor while it cooked and never attempted to eat any. I'd expect similar results from a mature feral boar. Kill it stone dead and it's probably okay, but put one behind the shoulder and I'd not want any part of it.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
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    I do like the idea of Ak 47 hunting... That'd be more fun than a man should have...

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    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    I know one thing for sure, I'd love to slam one with one of my hard cast 525 gr. Pile-Drivers.
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

  14. #14

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    We hunt Russian Boar along the Pass river and also along the Pearl River and I am here to tell you they can get big and they will work their way back around behind you and track you. Biggest I have seen shot was 630 pounds. The largest I have killed was 548. Took a back-hoe with a chain and a heavy duty scale and hooked it to the chain and then lifted the hog up in the air and it weighted 548. I shot him running from left to right at 30yds with a 180gr Partition Protected Point out of a Savage Classic in 30-06.
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    how come the big pigs are not fit to eat? used to have them on the farm 500-600 lbs after a few breeding years ... curious is all...
    Vince, I am an Iowa farm boy. Iowa produces over 25 percent of the national total of pork produced. The butcher pigs that we raised were for commercial sale and weren't pen raised but I can't help but think that the facts would be the same for both.

    Hogs at around 225lbs have put most of their weight on in the form of muscle, after 225lbs the ratio of weight gain as fat increases at a greater rate. The pork producers don't want to buy fat they want to buy lean meat and if the hogs get much over market weight they do dock on price per pound.

    I can remember helping grandpa skin a young 2 year old boar that zigged when she zagged and broke his dealy bob(can happen). This boar was totally grain fed and not confined but it still had so much fat on it that it was only good for sausage by our standards. I can't imagine eating a 700 pounder that roamed the wild consuming anything and everything! Then again, maybe I'm just spoiled

  16. #16

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    GoGoalie, They are omni which means both. That means carnivore is inclusive not exclusive especially if they are stalking a hunter(meat) but then again the hunter could have an apple in his pocket.

    Regardless you are right!

  17. #17

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    Man I would not eat a 250 pound or heavier Wild Boar much less like the the 548 pound boar I shot, they are just plain nasty. Now a female up to 250 is my limit on eating them unless we catch one and feed it for quite a few months and the female is not near as bad but won't eat one of them if I shot it and it was anywhere near 250 pounds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2dawgs View Post
    I do like the idea of Ak 47 hunting... That'd be more fun than a man should have...
    An M1A would work nicely too.

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    Only you MarineHawk That is cool and yes it would do nicely. You could drop a small herd of them before they left the field.
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Vince, I am an Iowa farm boy. Iowa produces over 25 percent of the national total of pork produced. The butcher pigs that we raised were for commercial sale and weren't pen raised but I can't help but think that the facts would be the same for both.

    Hogs at around 225lbs have put most of their weight on in the form of muscle, after 225lbs the ratio of weight gain as fat increases at a greater rate. The pork producers don't want to buy fat they want to buy lean meat and if the hogs get much over market weight they do dock on price per pound.

    I can remember helping grandpa skin a young 2 year old boar that zigged when she zagged and broke his dealy bob(can happen). This boar was totally grain fed and not confined but it still had so much fat on it that it was only good for sausage by our standards. I can't imagine eating a 700 pounder that roamed the wild consuming anything and everything! Then again, maybe I'm just spoiled
    Thanks sECC & BB. was just curious, we also used to raise the market pigs ~200-250 lbs but would enviably get a brood sow that was a few years older... had one mean old Yorkshire went near 800lbs ... meanest thing you ever seen... as remember she tasted great... but then, the meanness factor on her side had to factor in there somehow... you know some things you JUST WANT TO eat... but she was all suasage...and our were all pen raised, no meat or other ever soo... i see your difference.. thanks.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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