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Thread: Wood stove platform

  1. #1
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Wood stove platform

    Looking for advice on a hearth or platform to place a wood stove on, was thinking of going with a tile (maybe marble) anyone have any recommendations and possibly a place in the Kenai-Anchorage area to buy something nice, my stove is small about 16"x 30" but I was planning a 24"x36" platform/hearth.

    Thanks
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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    Use Ceramic tiles to help dissipate the heat, I use it on the wall behind my wood stove and it works great. make sure you put hardi board down before the tiles, don't ask me how I know.

  3. #3

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    ceramic tile is a good platform/base but anyform of tile/brick/masonery work will only look as good as your skills & profiency with said materials, & as gerberman stated use hardi-board for a barrier between the floor/wall to aid in fire prevention another good substitute is cement board it's waterproof & is highly flameproof, apply the cement board to the floor & walls & secure it with screws to the floor & studs then face the whole area with either tile,false stone,real stone whatever your choice, a company called Nova Brick makes a product you may be interested in & is available at most LOWES,HOMEDEPOTS,MENARDS, hardware stores & its very user friendly with choices of colors, pending on your budget a good masonery man should be able to do the job in brick or stone includeing materials rather reasonably & since thats his day job he should be in & out in less than a day, didnt mean to ramble on but hope i gave you some more ideas & options, good luck

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    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Though most inspectors either don't know the code or don't check, many locales require a minimum floor protection of around R -.800! That's about 2" of cement board (Durock, Wonderboard), 4" of brick or 10" of ceramic tile! The thinnest and best protection is mineral fiber board which is about R-1.25 per 1/4". Ceramic board (not cement) is good too, but both are quite expensive! Drywall is usually the cheapest at about R-.40 per 1/2". I'm not sure about the specs on your stove, but I know my Jotul called for a minimum hearth of 8" on each side and back (with heat shield) and 16" in front of the door. Given the size of your stove, I think a hearth of 32" x 54" would be pretty close to the legal minimum.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Depening on what you want you may have luck finding a remenant from one of the granit distributors that supply the custom countertop companies locally. Sometimes they have pieces fall and break and you can get a good deal on a piece that would otherwise cost quite a bit.

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    On the walls I use Durock mounted to hat channel to space the durock off the main wall. I keep the durock about an inch off the floor and leave the top open to allow air circulation. On the floor I set durock right on the subfloor. In one case I used slim brick to cover the durock. Slimbrick can be installed with a latex adhesive/grout from a gallon pail. Pretty handy. My floor never gets hot. The wall protection works great, too. Make your floor protection big enough to protect from hot embers coming out. Mine sticks out about a foot in front of the stove and I still have burns in the flooring in front of that.

  8. #8
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    I have seen and installed many of these over the years. If it has a plate on the back it will tell you what the hearth and wall required for the stove. If it does not you will have to go with what NFPA 211 says and you are looking at about 36'' of wall distance to a cumbustables you can reduce that by doing a 1 '' air space behind that. Hearth is generally 8'' on the sides and 16'' in front. Dura rock works the best for you base work and then tile onto that. Good luck

    Sweepint
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    The clearances for wood stoves given by manufacturers are very very conservative. I too followed their recommendations when installing my stove and added a 45 to the pipe to give myself the 6" clearance off the wall. One year of using the stove I was never able to feel any heat on the back wall at all and felt that the 45 was causing more of a hazard than the heat or lack there of coming from the stove. I took the 45 out and have been happy since. I have the stove surrounded by dura roc. The hearth is pebble tile and the area behind is stack stone by eldorado stone. All very nice stuff, bought the pebble at costco for a good price and the stack stone off craigslist.

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    Another thing I would invest in a quality stove that has shielding around the stove. I like the napoleon that central sells, good guys over there.

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    Default here is what im talking about

    Here is what I did
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  12. #12
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Platform

    My small platform not complete yet.
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  13. #13
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt.AK View Post
    Here is what I did
    Looks good on the floor and wall Mat but as Im sure you know you are too close to combustibles on the sides. I took pictures of mine for my insurance and I had some wood in a rack sitting on the pad 16 away from the stove. My agent told me to move the wood and retake the picture because if the underwriter sees that they would cancel my policy. They are stupid picky about wood stoves these days I guess.
    Andy
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    your right,

    I did that when I first installed the stove. Then I realized there is no heat at all coming from the sides of this napoleon stove. Shielded stove all the heat goes out the front and top. So that is why I built a little closer than the manual says too, by a couple inches. I swear the wood on the sides is room temp even when the stove is cranked which only happens at start up.

  15. #15
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    The clearances on that timberline will be much higher than most other stoves out there. I have installed or serviced a lot of these over the years. They put a lot of heat out all around the stove and you will need a good bit more that 16'' on the back and rear if it is unprotected.
    The big problem is not the first or the second year it is a few years down the road and the area around the stove that gets pretty hot (hotter than normal) the stove dries it out and can spontaneous combust.
    The hearth, you need at least 6 to 8'' on each side and on the back from the edge of the stove and 16'' in the front. Single wall pipe if you use it requires 16'' and 6'' if it is dbl pipe in or in 8'' requires 8''.
    I am not an insurance company but I have worked with them many times in the past when I was in this business (installation and service) if they can prove the stove was not installed properly after the fact they can give you a lot of grief when it comes to pay out.
    Just some things to think about, I am overseas right now but feel free to pm me if you have question and I would be happy to answer them.
    Good luck

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

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