Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: browning x bolt help!!

  1. #1

    Default browning x bolt help!!

    hi,
    im 17years old and today i got my first hunting rifle got a browning x bolt in 338 win mag my dad said i should be good with recoil but im not sure to be honest what are ur browning x bolt experiences.

  2. #2
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    I honestly believe that a 338 is a serious disservice to a new shooter. In a synthetic-stocked Browning it borders on child abuse.

    At some point you are likely going to realize it is not fun to get beat up like that and your shooting will suffer for it. Nothing in AK requires a 338. Oh, I have had a number of Browning rifles and have multiple rifles larger than the 338. I have a 358 Norma project that just came back with a new Douglass barrel and a paint job, so it is not about big rifles being bad.
    art

  3. #3
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Unit 13
    Posts
    1,477

    Default

    My browning .338 is great actually, I can handle recoil and was expecting alot more then I got on the first rounds fired outta the rifle. You'll be fine, just have good aim and you only need one shot.

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    336

    Default

    dont worry about it it wont be bad at all just go and shoot it make sure you get use to it before you hunt with it becaus if it scares you you will constantly pull your shots, its a fast push not relly a hard push and if it hurts go get a limbsave or other high end recoil pad.

  5. #5

    Default 338 Recoil

    After you shoot the rifle on the range a few times, you will know if you can stand the recoil. Some people can and some peopls can't. If you don't like the recoil take it to Wild West Guns and have a reciol reducer installed. You can call and they will give you a quote over the phone. It will be worth the money.

  6. #6
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    and for some reason.... it always hurts more at the range bench then in th field... heck i don't recall any of mine going off most the time, there is a critter in front of it... but that bench shooting it gets old fast... at least for me.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  7. #7
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    Do the only sensible thing you can with recoil- ignore it.

  8. #8

    Default

    I am glad to see that your dad doesn't believe in raising a sissy lala.

  9. #9
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    I would recommend dry firing the rifle A LOT. Same sight picture, same trigger pressure, same breathing practices, etc. but no bothersome recoil.

    During your sessions at the shooting range you should fire the rifle as long as you are comfortable, but no more and you'll be fine. Another excellent option is to tailor some handloads for your needs. There is nothing in NA that needs more than a 225 grain .338 at 2600 fps and those ballistics are probably going to be very comfortable in your rifle.

    When all else fails listen to hodgeman and ignore the recoil.
    Esse quam videri

  10. #10
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Yup, encourage one more kid to be afraid of his rifle and ignore it.

    Disgust at a father that would do this to a kid is the only emotion I can put a handle on. There is no doubt some can handle it, but the sheer stupidity of guessing is nearing criminal.

    If the kid had thousands of varied rounds behind him and knew exactly what he was getting into I would be solidly behind him. There is no need for that much gun and saddling a kid with it is indefensible.

    I have spent a lot of hours coaching shooters through the results of this exact brand of total stupidity. Luiss is far more likely to have a serious problem than not at some point in time. The 30-06 is more recoil than most can handle reliably.
    YMMV

    PS This is not directed at any particular responder...

  11. #11
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    Yup, encourage one more kid to be afraid of his rifle and ignore it....

    PS This is not directed at any particular responder...
    This is not a flame at you hap, but IMO&E problems from recoil are almost entirely psychological. That is to say that the effects to our physical bodies rarely amount to more than tenderness in the area of the shoulder; hardly the kind of physical damage that demands the focus shooters place upon it. I realize that there are reports of detached retinas, broken clavicles, and mutilated rotator cuffs all from the recoil of a high powered rifle. I suppose these things have happened, but their occurrences are uncommon (if not anomalous) to say the least.

    Primarily the most common physical response to recoil is a flinch. It is a natural, involuntary response to such stimuli. The only cures that I am aware of include preventing the recoil by dissipating it through various reduction systems (weights, brakes, pads, etc.) or ignoring its presence. While I'm a great fan of recoil pads I detest other recoil taming devices and have coped quite well with recoil by learning/training to ignore it. I focus on the target and my control of the sights/trigger and ignore the recoiling rifle. After the shot I find I am unharmed and I repeat the process again and again. Preparing mentally for the recoil (learning to ignore it) is significantly the most important aspect IMO. Obviously, YMMV.
    Esse quam videri

  12. #12
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    As I said, I have spent bunches of time with bunches of different shooters helping them "Just ignore it". It would be far less needed if a tiny speck of thought had gone into a decision like this. And it is not just pain (though the Browning synthetic stocks rank right up there in poor recoil control) but noise that causes problems. But understanding it from the perspective of the unbothered does not address the needs of the sensitive sort.

    I cannot begin to guess how many squib rounds I have loaded for various rifles to allow shy people to learn to shoot them. I have seen a lot of game not killed because of flinches, fear, and frustration. Handicapping a kid is not good for anyone and I only hope it does not happen here...
    art

  13. #13
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    2,624

    Default

    Luisss,
    I have a browning in 300 win mag and it is very comfortable to shoot, I doubt the 338 will be much different. How about telling us a bit about yourself?
    Avg size? What caliber guns have you shot before this?
    If you go to a range don't overdo the first 3 or 4 trips - one box of 20 would be plenty - maybe even 10 the first trip.
    Take a towel or small sandbag along - if the recoil is a bit much put that between the butt of the gun and your shoulder - that should help. As Vince said - sighting in target practicing is much worse than in the field on the hunt for sure!
    One thing that usually applies to all new shooters - if you are afraid before you pull the trigger it can seem alot worse.
    I agree with hap its more than enuff gun - but if you have shot anything close - 3006 - 300win mag etc - you should not be afraid to try this gun out...
    Randy
    Shoot Low Shorty - They are Riding Shetlands!

  14. #14
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Randy
    The 338WM has easily 25% more free recoil energy then the 300WM. In the same rifle the 338 is actually going to be lighter by a significant amount (more metal removed for the bore) than the 300.

    The 300 magnums are simply my favorite calibers and I have examples of almost every flavor. And I have lots of trigger time with them. The 338WM is one of my least favorite because of all the extra buck and roar for virtually nothing extra. The 338 is far more on the back end than the 300WM.

    I hope he never has an issue...
    art

  15. #15
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    In seriousness, I wasn't being flippant when I said the only sensible thing to do with recoil is to ignore it. When I grew up the 30-30 was considered enough gun and the '06 a hard kicker that killed at both ends needlessly.... so I shot my first '06 at 17 and hated the recoil but eventually I got used to it. I got my first .300 expecting destruction from recoil and after a while I thought it kicked no harder than my '06. My first .375 I expected to knock me out of my boots...but guess what- it didn't and I don't think it is too bad. I expected my .338 to hit like a freight train but it doesn't hit a lick harder than my .300. I started my wife on my .300 and told her it didn't kick too hard. She shot it and thinks it doesn't kick too bad. All this leads me to believe that recoil effect is primarily between your ears-at least at the levels we're discussing. So I think you should do a few things-

    1.Wear good hearing protection- muzzle blast is more disturbing than recoil to most folks.
    2. Limit the amount you shoot from a bench- with bench shooting you soak up every bit of the recoil. Try sitting or even standing with a rest a bit. Study proper form before you even pull the trigger. Proper form will attenuate a lot of painful recoil.
    3. Don't blast 40-50 rounds in a session- dry fire practice a lot and only shoot 10 or 15 at the range. A little good practice is better than a lot of bad practice. With shells at $40+ a box I'm thinking you'll be shooting less than you want.
    4. Spend money on a scope with good eye relief- your shoulder can take a fair beating but concentrate just a fraction of that force on your eyebrow and you'll develop a catastrophic flinch before you know it. Eye relief is important.
    5. Get a good .22 and shoot the crap out of it between groups-

    A stout lad who might be playing hockey or high school ball can expect to get hit a lot harder than a .338 can- so why doesn't he freak out about getting tackled or checked? Because nobody told him to.

    Good shooting.

  16. #16
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Hodgeman
    I grudgingly must admit you redeemed yourself a great deal with this post. Your points are spot on in almost all cases and you make a ton of sense... With just one tiny problem that wipes everything else out!

    If Luiss develops a flinch and screws up repeatedly and tries too hard to impress others before controling his flinch it will be a crying shame. And it all comes back to a horrible decision for a first rifle. The 338 recoils two and a half times harder than an ordinary 270. That ain't nuthin'.

    My father was a custom rifle builder and wrote quite a bit back in the '60s and '70s when I was coming of age. He had lots of boomers including a 458WM he wrote a couple articles on for the American Rifleman. I shot that thing a bunch with reduced loads. One day I was slipped a real one just to make the point that recoil was not an issue.

    It was...

    It likely contributed to the shoulder surgery I finally had over 20 years later. My father was more than a little embarrassed. he thought it would be no big deal. I weighed at least 160 pounds and was way past 6', it should have been a nonissue. It led to a nonshooting stretch that lasted several years.

    Only an idiot would a strap a kid with a 338... Your excellent points not withstanding.
    art

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,225

    Default

    It all depends on the kid. Recoil is the number one culprit behind poor shooting. all you have to do it start flinching and you are in trouble. a .338WM is a lot of rifle for most anyone. that being said my daughter used to shoot my 06 all the time when she was 14-15. She is small in stature and she just never let the recoil bother her. She thought it was cool. I have seen big guys flinch like crazy with an 06. it all depends on the shooter.

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,247

    Default

    Perhaps I am different but the first thing I did when I made the jump from my 30-30 to a magnum caliber was to point it in a safe direction (Big dirt backstop) pull it in tight to my shoulder and pull the trigger. I just pointed it toward the center of the dirt mound kept my eye a good ways back from the scope and gave a quick tug on the hook. Like pulling a bandaid off a wound just got it over with. After that I went to work and had it grouping nicely a few rounds later. I really just wanted to see what it felt like before adding in all the other junk (like aiming/breathing/trigger squeeze). That worked for me and I have shot quite a few more powerful guns since with no issues.

    FYI, before I ever pulled the trigger on that browning I would pick up a Limbsaver recoil pad for it. They have one that is a direct replacement for the factory one on the X-Bolt. 2 screws and about 5 minutes and you will have a much more comfortable gun to shoot.The cost is very reasonable as well.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,197

    Default

    Congratulations on your first hunting rifle, Luisss. I hope that you have many years of safe and memorable hunting experiences with it in your hand. I suspect that your father was well intentioned when he chose and recommended the caliber, and I do not judge his choice. Please do not be offended by some of the comments made in response to your post...I am sure they were also well intentioned.

    At 17 you are just a hair away from being an adult, so I don't view you as a kid. In fact, when I was 17 I was in the Marine Corps. That said, you can learn to accurately shoot this rifle...people learn to manage recoil all the time...and also people can quickly pick-up some very bad habits that are later hard to break. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations to make sure that you have a good recoil butt-pad and wear a shoulder pad when at the range, I strongly encourage you to go to the range with someone who can help you learn to shoot your new rifle without becoming afraid of it...perhaps your dad is just the guy to do that. If not, I'm sure you could find someone here who would be happy to help you after hunting season is over.

    The main thing to remember is "practice doesn't make perfect...it makes permanence" (Dr. P. Wolfe, 2010). In otherwords, good practice makes perfect.

    Doc
    NRA Life/Benefactor Member

  20. #20
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,247

    Default

    The good news is that as long as you can control everything before the recoil the bullet will hit it's mark. It is long gone before you will ever feel a thing. The very first time I shot a 338 it was at a goat a long ways off. Just like any other rifle the bullet hit where I aimed it and I still couldn't tell you if that thing kicked at all. I never felt it but the goat sure did!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •