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Thread: S&W 340, Scandium 357

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Default S&W 340, Scandium 357

    Just purchased this gun. it will be my CC weapon. I've been told that I need to be cognizant of the kick that the 357 can put out of this gun, since it's so light. Purchased some .38 rounds for "learning" and then will step up to the .357 to get comfortable. Anyone have any input on these, before I go out and shoot it? Besides that it will kick like a SOB with the .357 loads?
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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    hey alaskan; this is my scandium 329pd .44 magnum and it is an excellent shooter. i handload for it and keep heavy hardcast bullets at 1150-1200 fps and found it to be accurate and pleasant to shoot! load down your shooter just a bit, and you will find it more to your liking.
    i did an action job on it as well.........which really helps the double action.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    I purchaed the Buffalo Bores (180 gr) for my "protection" loads.

    What do you mean "load down"? You mean, just make them "not so hot"?

    What kind of "action job"? I'm not a huge fan of the double action it, as the trigger pull is huge (yes, I knew it buying it), but might be nice to make an adjustment to it to make it a bit nicer of shooter.
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    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    I bought one for my wife, and it's certainly a handful. With 38 Special loads it's not too bad to practice with, but three cylinders of full-bore 357 split the skin on my middle and ring fingers where they contacted the rear of the trigger guard. I decided +P 38 loads were appropriate for this particular gun and that's what we practiced with and carried until it was replaced in a 2-for-1 trade that I now somewhat regret.

    Things to be prepared for: Heavy bullets (158gr and higher) will unseat themselves when shooting and cause the cylinder to bind, so stick to lighter weight bullets. The muzzle flash from a 110gr Winchester .357 is about 5 feet long and will light small trees afire. Cor-Bon hunting loads with the 180gr lead bullets will almost twist the gun out of your grip, and there is really no way to prevent this from happening. If you have a friend slip in an empty shell when practicing, you WILL reveal all your bad pistol shooting habits. Shooting gloves were made for this pistol, and are almost necessary for anything more than 5 shots.

    I'm sure there are more lessons but I've forgotten them, which is probably why I somewhat regret trading it for a Sig 220 and a Kel-Tec P3AT. It's a great carry gun and I carried it frequently, but it's not a really good gun if you plan to shoot it often...
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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    alaskan; hardcast w/gas check will out perform ( and out penetrate) other bullet designs, and are cheaper too! i recommend a 180gr flatpoint for your .357. keep your loads at 950-1000fps and you will be amazed at their penetration, and reduced recoil. follow your manual and reduce your load. hot factory ammo will test 1275fps-1350fps lighter, faster bullets will kick harder and expand violently on contact.

    if you are familiar with the smith lockwork it is easy to tune.....if not, just switch out your mainspring & trigger return spring for a huge improvement.

    good luck and....
    happy trails.
    jh

  6. #6

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    I too have the 329PD 44. Yes it is a handful will full house loads compared to other 44s I have shot and I imagine the 357 will be similar. One thing to consider is buying a hogue grip for it. I bought the S&W 500 grip for mine and it help a lot!! Sure it kicks but a 1.5 pounds I don't mind hauling it along on my summer hikes. 44 specials are fun to shoot in it, but the 44s are tolerable. But I didn't buy it to plink constantly with either I have other handguns for that.

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Yeah...I got the Buffalo Bore bullets (180 gr) and after checking the box last night they said at 1400 fps....ouch. They are the solid lead, and flat tipped, and as mentioned I wanted them specifically for hiking in bear country (I do have a 454 for this, but not anywhere close to as light). But those rounds won't do me any good if after 2-3 it unseats the other bullets. Want to have 5 available, not just 2 or 3.

    I'm going to look into the Hogue grip though. Not sure if it will help on the recoil, but might on the pain in my hand. Then again, if a bear is coming, I might not feel a thing. For personal carry, i think the 38 +Ps will be good rounds... When I was in Fbks looking at rounds they only had one type for the .357, and that was the Buffalo Bores... Guess I'll have to keep my eyes open.
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    I have a model 642. It's only chambered for .38+p, but I find that to be plenty of power for me. (I live where we don't worry about any bears wandering into town.) I found that putting on a rubber grip that covers the backstrap helped a bit with recoil; I have Pachmayr "compac" grips on mine, though I hear Hogue's are pretty good. The Hogues are full-sized, so concealment might become an issue. I think Pachmayr also makes full-sized "decelerator" grips that are made of softer rubber.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

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    I have one that I commonly carry while out and about. I have pretty much given up trying to shoot it accurately with full power 357 loads. I now use 38 Spec "personal defense" in it. I just couldn't shoot it enough with 357 to get sufficiently proficient with it. I am much better with the 38s. First shot with the 357 is OK but followups for me were all over the place.

    btw....I have come to like the DAO......not much to think about.... draw and squeeze....

    Slim

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    I've got one with the hogue grips. Its the gun I'm most likely to carry due to its so easy to keep in your pocket comfortably. While I dont shoot it a lot, I have shot it a fair bit and of course had to run some of the magnums through it to make sure how it'll behave if I ever need it. Unlike the many stories I keep hearing, I would never characterize it as diffucult or even all that high recoil, certainly not compared to my larger caliber handguns. I usually carry the corbons. I think its a great gun.

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    How long is the barrel on your gun?

    If it's a snubbie, give it up.

    Smitty of the North
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    It's a snubby...and if these 180gr Buffalo Bores are as bad as they say...I might just.

    The grip on mine seems nice. Not too hard, not uber soft. Just right. I guess there is only one way to find out how bad the mule is gonna kick.

    Think the .38+Ps might be my primary round...but we'll see. Defeated the purpose I wanted of having it for bear on certain hikes if the .357s are too much for my Sally butt.
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    When you test it, wear gloves. (To begin with.)

    Those tool gloves that fit tight, aren't too expensive.

    Maybe, cut off the fingers. ???

    For a light weight 357, I've considered the S&W Mdl 60 with a long barrel.

    I have a light weight 38 Special with a 3" barrel that I can manage easily. It has long Hogue rubber grips.

    TRY, the 180s and then you'll know if the recoil is something you can deal with it.

    Smitty of the North
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    Handsdown the most painful handgun I've ever fired! I can't believe I was stupid enough to shoot the full cylinder in my buddies gun.

    I've fired a 4 5/8" super blackhawk 500 linebaugh will full patch 440 gr loads, and the 357 scandium was more painful!

    If anyone wants to understand what the sensation of shooting one of these nice to pack but nasty to fire guns is like, put you shooting hand on a hard surface palm up. Put a 16 oz ball peen hammer in your off hand. Beat the web of your shooting hand with the hammer.

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    Alaskan22:
    Since you have the gun, you owe it to yourself to try and deal with it.

    IF, you can find grips that are LONGER, and I dunno if you can, that would certainly help.

    I took a Basic Handgun course recently, and when I mentioned that the recoil of my Walther PPK, was painful, the instructor said, "just accept it." or words to that effect.

    I did that, and also held the gun as they taught in the class, and the results were amazing. I shot it much better and without the dread of the recoil.

    I realize that your gun will recoil more than my PPK, but the mindset might help you anyway.

    I'm no expert on handguns, which is why I took the course, but I wonder if the 180s might recoil a little slower than the lightweight HP bullets commonly used for defensive purposes.

    Anyhoo, you have an opportunity here to learn something and pass it along to us.

    Smitty of the North

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    I'm currently "away from home" so I won't be able to shoot it any time too soon. However I am planning on putting at least 5 of the 180gr BBs through it. I owe it to the gun (not so much to myself ). I have the 38+Ps that I'll put through it too (those are 130gr though), so either way I'm going to find out. I've been looking up grips but it's fairly limited for these guns. Hogue does make one, but the "full rubber" is in Pink...so that is out (yeah, i do have too much pride for the pink handle). However, if it does become unbearable to shoot...well, then the pride is gonna take a hit and Ill try the grips out. The gun is for protection, not looks (and I'll keep telling myself that if I do end up with the pink grips).

    I thought about the crimson trace grips for it...but, they are made of hard rubber, so not really helping the recoil issue. Again, need to be able (more practice will help) to put 5 shots downrange, fairly accurately for this gun to fill its purpose. If it can't do that, or I can't, then I'll have to head back to the drawing board. Doesn't do me any good to carry a firearm I can't shoot, or can shoot but can't hit anything with it. I'm not gonna rely on the "adrenaline factor" to hide the recoil. That is just asking for trouble.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post
    Again, need to be able (more practice will help) to put 5 shots downrange, fairly accurately for this gun to fill its purpose. If it can't do that, or I can't, then I'll have to head back to the drawing board. Doesn't do me any good to carry a firearm I can't shoot, or can shoot but can't hit anything with it. I'm not gonna rely on the "adrenaline factor" to hide the recoil. That is just asking for trouble.
    OK, that makes sense.

    The wrong choice of gun or ammo, in a tight situation, is a hindrance you don't need.

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    Yup...and this gun is too light to, as a back up plan, throw at the "offender" (be bear or human).

    Home now...Will take it out to the range shortly. Should be interesting...
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    Yer having fun with this novelty gun, and you ain't even shot it yit.

    Thanks for sharing it with the rest of us.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel Nut View Post
    I bought one for my wife, and it's certainly a handful. With 38 Special loads it's not too bad to practice with, but three cylinders of full-bore 357 split the skin on my middle and ring fingers where they contacted the rear of the trigger guard. I decided +P 38 loads were appropriate for this particular gun and that's what we practiced with and carried until it was replaced in a 2-for-1 trade that I now somewhat regret.

    Things to be prepared for: Heavy bullets (158gr and higher) will unseat themselves when shooting and cause the cylinder to bind, so stick to lighter weight bullets. The muzzle flash from a 110gr Winchester .357 is about 5 feet long and will light small trees afire. Cor-Bon hunting loads with the 180gr lead bullets will almost twist the gun out of your grip, and there is really no way to prevent this from happening. If you have a friend slip in an empty shell when practicing, you WILL reveal all your bad pistol shooting habits. Shooting gloves were made for this pistol, and are almost necessary for anything more than 5 shots.

    I'm sure there are more lessons but I've forgotten them, which is probably why I somewhat regret trading it for a Sig 220 and a Kel-Tec P3AT. It's a great carry gun and I carried it frequently, but it's not a really good gun if you plan to shoot it often...
    This mirrors my experiences too a tee. I have a Scandium 357 and the wife has a steel 65LS Ladysmith 357. With my big hands they both make my knuckle bleed from the trigger guard mashing into it before long. The wife can shoot them all day but canít hit very well with the lighter Scandium, with her 65LS she can keep 90% on a pie plate at 50í all day. We pack 158g hollow points in then for CC around town, for the field the wife has a Blackhawk in 45 Colt and I pack an X frame in 460. If I was to take a 357 afield (and I used to all the time) I would load it with the hottest 180g hard cast with as flat a nose as I could get.

    I like a snub and from watching Jerry Miculek pop cans at 100 yards holding the gun upside down I know the stubby barrel isnít the limiting factor many think it is. I think the major accuracy benefit to longer barrels is the longer sight radius. A 4Ē or 5Ē isnít much harder to pack if you canít hit with a snub but I sure like having a little snub J frame in my pocket where a longer gun wonít fit.
    Andy
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